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Author Topic: The best tasting orange for coolder climate?  (Read 431 times)

Fabio

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The best tasting orange for coolder climate?
« on: January 03, 2017, 05:00:05 PM »
I known about the hybrid "US 119" but I dont have direct  experience, I read in some pages that are smaller of commercial oranges and have  the bitterness of Poncirus trifoliata is that true? I have a possibility to buy Sun chu Shu , but I dont know nothing about it, the same with variety Morton.

Citradia

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Re: The best tasting orange for coolder climate?
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2017, 07:44:50 PM »
I've seen US 119 fruit at SE citrus forums, didn't get to taste it, but it looked like a regular orange to me in cross section with nice orange/yellow color. I'd be glad to have one. I have s Morton citrange sapling, is cold hardy, and I've seen the large beautiful fruits at citrus forums, but didn't taste it, but did smell a cross section of it, and must say it smelled rather spunky. A grower in AL says it makes a good citrus drink with added sugar. I'm glad to have mine and hope to try the fruit one day.

Millet

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Re: The best tasting orange for coolder climate?
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2017, 09:14:20 PM »
US 119 is a cross of [(Poncirus trifoliata x Citrus paradisi) x Citrus sinensis].  The tree has all three types of citrus leaves, mono and bi, but with trifoliate leaves dominating. The fruit does have a sweet taste to it but with an unpleasant lingering bitter Trifoliate aftertaste. Sun chu Shu I know nothing about.  The Morton citrange is a very juicy fruit and is if flavored much like an orange.  It is sweet but with strong lingering Trifoliate  aftertaste. The juice cannot be diluted to obtain a satisfactory flavor.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2017, 09:43:39 PM by Millet »

Laaz

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Re: The best tasting orange for coolder climate?
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2017, 09:41:51 AM »
If you're 8b / 9a you should be able to grow just about any orange. You just want to get early ripening types if you don't want to protect the fruit. Hamlin is a great variety as is the Washington navel. US 119 is nasty if you ask me.

Fabio

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Re: The best tasting orange for coolder climate?
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2017, 12:26:42 PM »
Yes, but I m  afraid of losting plants if I plant "common" oranges . With varieties like Morton, US 119  I will be safe , the place where can i put the plants are in sunny position with some protection of house and on the left side of palms.

Pancrazio

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Re: The best tasting orange for coolder climate?
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2017, 05:48:18 PM »
If i recall correctly US119 could have some problems with fruit splitting, but i'm unsure.
Italian fruit forum

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LaCasaVerde

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Re: The best tasting orange for coolder climate?
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2017, 09:51:32 PM »
 Second Hamlin and navel oranges best chance for your zone.

 Going to 27 f/-3c in a couple of days from now. The hamlin will be unprotected. I have one that has survived -7c.

TonyinCC

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Re: The best tasting orange for coolder climate?
« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2017, 03:24:05 PM »
The trifoliate bitterness in US119 is mostly in the pith and the sheaths around each segment,if you individually peel each segment or gently juice it, it is of acceptable quality with just a very slight astringency. I enjoyed it, but it takes more time to eat one.
 Morton has too much trifoliate bitterness even if segments are peeled.
  I would suggest Owari satsuma or Ambersweet if you can find them. Ambersweet is almost as cold hardy as satsuma,it is actually a tangelo.
Ambersweet is to all appearances a high quality orange,but failed commercially due to low yield. I grew all of those except US119  and Morton, hundreds of miles north of Florida near Charleston,SC. All survived a hard freeze of -9.4 C
Ambersweet lost all leaves and wood smaller than a finger diameter at those temperatures but ripened early before the freezes. Satsuma lost leaves at -6.6 C and branches smaller than a pencil at -7.8 C.
  Changsha tangerine will take -10C or colder with little damage and has good flavor and juice but the fruit is 30-50% seeds. Meiwa kumquats are wonderful and are about as hardy as satsuma but grow very slowly so are slow to recover from damage. Meiwa is a must have in any cold hardy citrus collection.
Ambersweet has much more vigor than satsuma so makes a larger tree even though it is  more susceptible to freeze damage. Orlando tangelo is slightly more cold hardy than an orange but of similar size and eating quality.

This website has some information about some other hardy citrus but does not ship overseas.

http://mckenzie-farms.com/photo.htm

vlan1

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Re: The best tasting orange for coolder climate?
« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2017, 07:34:51 PM »
Supposedly Republic of Texas Orange is one of the hardiest if not THE hardiest true oranges.

 

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