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Author Topic: Mayhaw Trees  (Read 240 times)

MarvelMango

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Mayhaw Trees
« on: February 13, 2017, 04:59:51 PM »
Anyone know anything about these? They say they can grow in zone 10 but does anyone have exp. growing them?
Quentin

TriangleJohn

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Re: Mayhaw Trees
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2017, 10:06:03 AM »
I have a small collection of them but I live in zone 7b (Raleigh NC). I have three or four varieties all based on the natives found in the Southeastern US. I also have Azarole which is an Italian relative. All of them are slow growing for me and now at 5 years of age they are just starting to bloom and fruit. The only one I've tasted is the Azarole which has a mild apple/rose hip flavor. My trees do show signs of normal fruit tree diseases but they don't seem to suffer from them.

MarvelMango

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Re: Mayhaw Trees
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2017, 10:55:38 AM »
There most be a reason you don't here about anyone growing them this far south.
Maybe the fruit just isn't all that.
Quentin

Citradia

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Re: Mayhaw Trees
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2017, 10:23:15 PM »
I grew up in Bradenton, FL and was always looking for and trying to grow flowering trees. Don't remember seeing mayhaws or hawthorns there in zone 9/10. However, when we moved to Gainesville In north FL, mayhaws/hawthorn grew wild in the woods. The fruit was smaller than wild crabapples and had a large pit in the center, not pretty fruit, yellowish color. Heard some people made jelly out of it. We have different varieties of wild hawthorns here in NC with wild ones on my property having the worst long needle-like thorns you ever saw. Worse than poncyrus trifoliata ever thought about being. Makes loads of flowers in spring and loads of tiny haw apples in fall though. Crabapples easier to process for jelly though and not as thorny. You probably don't get enough chilling hours in zone 10 FL to get haw to bloom, or they would be noticed in the woods and planted along interstate highways there like they are in north FL.

TonyinCC

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Re: Mayhaw Trees
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2017, 10:06:33 PM »
Mayhaws make one of the very best jams you will ever taste. I have a bearing age tree at my farm in South Carolina. I will get you some fruit to start seeds from if the last frost didn't wipe out the crop. Worth a try I just don't have room at my place in Cape Coral to grow one.

MarvelMango

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Re: Mayhaw Trees
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2017, 07:08:16 PM »
That's awesome. Will look forward to it.
Quentin

 

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