Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Growing Mango trees in Southern California  (Read 10073 times)

CA Hockey

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 60
    • Orange, CA 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #125 on: August 19, 2017, 09:46:50 AM »
I called la Verne and asked them directly. They said they use the same rootstock for all their mangoesband just graft on other varieties (like keitt). For Manila, they just let thebrootstock grow.

I did try and graft on earlier this season. Didn't takenbutbthat was probably me.

I recently found a 15 gallon la Verne Manila monster at h&h nursery in Lakewood. Couldn't believe the size of this juggernaut. Will post a picture if I can figure that out later.

spaugh

  • Amatuer gardener
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 465
    • Poway, San Diego County, California 9B, sunset 21
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #126 on: August 22, 2017, 04:24:20 PM »
Heres the multigraft tree Simon, and my 20222 winters and sweet tart.






spaugh

  • Amatuer gardener
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 465
    • Poway, San Diego County, California 9B, sunset 21
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #127 on: August 22, 2017, 04:46:48 PM »
I called la Verne and asked them directly. They said they use the same rootstock for all their mangoesband just graft on other varieties (like keitt). For Manila, they just let thebrootstock grow.

I did try and graft on earlier this season. Didn't takenbutbthat was probably me.

I recently found a 15 gallon la Verne Manila monster at h&h nursery in Lakewood. Couldn't believe the size of this juggernaut. Will post a picture if I can figure that out later.

I wish I could find some of those in San Diego County.  Would speed things up considerably if they were a decent shape and ready to graft onto.

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3928
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #128 on: August 22, 2017, 10:26:53 PM »
Thanks for the update Spaugh! Just for clarification, the experimental multiple rootstock tree is innarched but ungrafted(no mature scion wood grafted on). I neglected it by keeping it in the pot too long but it looks like it's really enjoying your fast draining soil. I'm eager to see how it will grow once the roots are fully established.

Simon

spaugh

  • Amatuer gardener
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 465
    • Poway, San Diego County, California 9B, sunset 21
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #129 on: August 22, 2017, 10:46:16 PM »
 :) the other seedling looks good too, it has a little flush started that is deep purple also.  The florida trees had more of a brown flush.  Ive got about 15 altfolo seeds started, a couple kents and keitts.  Going to setup a grow lamp in my garage (which stays a bit cooler than outside) this week and put half indoors and give them RO water and liquid fertilizer and see how they like that.

JF

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5748
  • North Orange County Zone 10B Sunset 24
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #130 on: September 01, 2017, 01:58:33 AM »
Top 5 mangos in SoCal so far long way to go
St 5
Carrie4.90
coc 4.75
Fairchild 4.65
HK4.5

OCchris1

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 240
    • Old Towne Orange, CA 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #131 on: September 01, 2017, 02:29:42 AM »
Thats funny. I gave a couple of 'Carries' to an Indian colleague and she hasn't stopped raving about them since last year. To each their own (I like them...Shh). Chris

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3928
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #132 on: September 01, 2017, 10:11:08 AM »
Top 5 mangos in SoCal so far long way to go
St 5
Carrie4.90
coc 4.75
Fairchild 4.65
HK4.5

Frank, thanks for the report! I really like the top three you have listed so far. Too bad my Carrie on Turpentine rootstock died shortly after it fruited. I'm going to graft a few onto my seedling rootstocks.

For those growing mangos in SoCal, if you have young trees that are not of fruit bearing age, you can fertilize again right now to encourage an additional flush if your tree isn't already in an active state of growth.

Simon

TheWaterbug

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 291
    • Palos Verdes, CA, Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783'
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #133 on: September 26, 2017, 11:08:46 AM »

I heard from a guy who grew florida mangoes in California to pluck off the fruits after they get to the size of a large lima bean, then it thinks it's done fruiting for the year. I tried it myself and even in cold weather, the mangoes don't seem to be putting out new flowers, rather, a heck more leaf growth has pushed out!

My 3-yr-old Keitt tree (from Plant-o-gram) sprouted some panicles this summer, and I snipped them all off when the fruits got to about that size. It just pushed out the nicest vegetative flush it's ever grown.

So maybe there's hope, yet!

And here is it:





I'd say nearly half of the total foliage is brand new.


This tree has done almost nothing for 3 years, but it's finally starting to grow. I wonder what prompted it to get going.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

Mugenia

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 87
    • People's Republic of California USDA Zone 10
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #134 on: September 26, 2017, 11:40:36 AM »
I have a question about growing mangoes in California. I am having my father in-law flying in from the Philippines to help me with the yard and tropical fruit trees while I am overseas. Can variety of mangoes like Valencia Pride stay the cold nights of Riverside uncovered? He possibly doesn't know what the hell he is doing over there. That's why I don't want to bother him over covering this tree, that tree. I just want him to do basis plant care only. Thanks.

behlgarden

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1415
    • CA, Zone 10 B
    • View Profile
    • LED Bulbs for Landscape Lighting
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #135 on: September 26, 2017, 12:17:32 PM »
yes, I am in Corona and we every year hit 32, havent lost much, however occasionaly you will lose a limb on young trees. key is on frost nights (there are 1 or 3 per year) water heavy, water keeps the temps up.

Mugenia

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 87
    • People's Republic of California USDA Zone 10
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #136 on: September 26, 2017, 12:29:18 PM »
That's good to hear.  Thanks,  Behl!

yes, I am in Corona and we every year hit 32, havent lost much, however occasionaly you will lose a limb on young trees. key is on frost nights (there are 1 or 3 per year) water heavy, water keeps the temps up.

spaugh

  • Amatuer gardener
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 465
    • Poway, San Diego County, California 9B, sunset 21
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #137 on: September 26, 2017, 01:32:32 PM »

I heard from a guy who grew florida mangoes in California to pluck off the fruits after they get to the size of a large lima bean, then it thinks it's done fruiting for the year. I tried it myself and even in cold weather, the mangoes don't seem to be putting out new flowers, rather, a heck more leaf growth has pushed out!

My 3-yr-old Keitt tree (from Plant-o-gram) sprouted some panicles this summer, and I snipped them all off when the fruits got to about that size. It just pushed out the nicest vegetative flush it's ever grown.

So maybe there's hope, yet!

And here is it:





I'd say nearly half of the total foliage is brand new.


This tree has done almost nothing for 3 years, but it's finally starting to grow. I wonder what prompted it to get going.


Looks nice.  I guess it was the heat wave we had 3 weeks ago.  How hot did it get there for the heat wave?

Zarafet

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 133
    • Southern California 9B
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #138 on: September 27, 2017, 08:48:40 AM »
I have used cloud cover (or wilt pruf) on 30 degree nights and have NEVER  lost a leaf or branch. It's not guaranteed as there are many factors like microclimate that play a role in protecting the tree. I also use it in the dead in summer on over 100 degree days to protect from sunburn and water loss due to the heat, on top of painting trunks and exposed branches with a 50/50 mixture of paint and water.



I have a question about growing mangoes in California. I am having my father in-law flying in from the Philippines to help me with the yard and tropical fruit trees while I am overseas. Can variety of mangoes like Valencia Pride stay the cold nights of Riverside uncovered? He possibly doesn't know what the hell he is doing over there. That's why I don't want to bother him over covering this tree, that tree. I just want him to do basis plant care only. Thanks.

Jct

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 58
  • Zone 10b
    • San Diego
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #139 on: September 27, 2017, 01:47:40 PM »
I wish I could find some of those in San Diego County.  Would speed things up considerably if they were a decent shape and ready to graft onto.
Not sure if you are looking for just the Manila Mango or ones with another variety grafted onto it, but I've seen a bunch of Manilas at Walter Anderson.  Some look better than others and they're a bit expensive, but I ended up taking the plunge on one.  Growth has been slow so far.
LaVerne Manila Mango; Pixie Crunch, Honeycrisp & Gala Apple Trees; Violette De Bordeaux & Black Mission Fig; Santa Rosa Plum; Nagami Kumquat, Pixie Tangerine, Lemon & Washington Navel Citrus; White & Red Dragon Fruit; Miracle Berry Plant (Synsepalum dulcificum)

TheWaterbug

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 291
    • Palos Verdes, CA, Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783'
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #140 on: September 27, 2017, 02:36:31 PM »
I'd say nearly half of the total foliage is brand new.

This tree has done almost nothing for 3 years, but it's finally starting to grow. I wonder what prompted it to get going.
Looks nice.  I guess it was the heat wave we had 3 weeks ago.  How hot did it get there for the heat wave?
80s and 90s. Not terribly hot. And not terribly different from what happened last August. Maybe it just hit adolescence, finally.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

AnnonaMangoLord45

  • LeafyMango
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 260
  • I love Mangoes
    • SoCal zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #141 on: September 27, 2017, 03:24:37 PM »
Hey guys, I'm having trouble deciding which sweet tart mango seedling came true, answer tree 1 or tee 2 depending on which is true, they both have a very pungent odor to their leaves
Tree 1









Tree 2


[url=https://postimg.org/image/s2akmxbqt/]




simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3928
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #142 on: September 28, 2017, 10:04:07 AM »
Hey Annonamangolord, if you don't have a real Sweet Tart to compare the scent to, you can stop by my house to break a leaf off and compare to your seedlings. In these cases where you are not sure which one is the true clone, it's best to grow both seedlings together and wait for them to fruit and then ax the one that is not the clone, unless of course the non clone also has great fruit. I have several Sweet Tart seedlings and in my case, both seedlings arising from the seed are both clones.

Simon

spaugh

  • Amatuer gardener
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 465
    • Poway, San Diego County, California 9B, sunset 21
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #143 on: September 28, 2017, 11:23:11 AM »
I'd say nearly half of the total foliage is brand new.

This tree has done almost nothing for 3 years, but it's finally starting to grow. I wonder what prompted it to get going.
Looks nice.  I guess it was the heat wave we had 3 weeks ago.  How hot did it get there for the heat wave?
80s and 90s. Not terribly hot. And not terribly different from what happened last August. Maybe it just hit adolescence, finally.

I looked at the weather for your town its 70s all week.  Its in the 90s here.  You got some beautiful mild weather there.  Maybe a bit overly mild for mangos.  They really like triple digit heat to make them grow.

sapote

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 434
    • USA, CA, Burbank, 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #144 on: September 28, 2017, 01:59:17 PM »
Looking at spaugh's pic in post #80: the tree was under stress and wanted to die. It said let me die once I bear some babies. The the photos it seems the environment is hot , strong sun, and low humidity during summer. Look at the lower part of the trunk: scorched bark.

Now look at pic in post #126 of the same garden -- the un-scorched trunk had some protection from the lower leaves.

In this environment, we can help the mangoes by protecting the exposed trunks (wrapping light color paper around, or allowing shootings remain around the lower trunks to provide shade).

spaugh

  • Amatuer gardener
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 465
    • Poway, San Diego County, California 9B, sunset 21
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #145 on: September 28, 2017, 04:40:04 PM »
The tree from post 80 wasn't in the later post but I have some photos of it.  All of the trees were planted during the cold season and then pugged in spring of this year to a bare stem around 18" tall.  When it grew it started flowering because it is a florida grafted tree and the cold weather makes it bloom until summer.  Once the temps got up it did a few vegetative flushes.  This tree did more flowers over winter than my others.  Its the reason Simon says graft onto a mature tree.  Or they will end up like this one spending half the year flowering.









greenbean88

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • USA, Trabuco Canyon, CA, Zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #146 on: September 29, 2017, 07:02:33 PM »
WOW this thread has been a wealth of knowledge to read through as a very new SoCal Mango guy. I currently have 4 mangos in the ground and room for about six more :) I want to take the time and transition everything to Manila root stock myself. My question is if I have several Manila root stock plants that I bought from Lowes should I plant these trees in there permanent locations right now or leave them in there pots and graft/plant them in spring?   

Also on a separate issue Toptropicals website is posting that they have Orange Sherbet grafted trees for sale is there any possibility that this could be legit?
Erik

AnnonaMangoLord45

  • LeafyMango
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 260
  • I love Mangoes
    • SoCal zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #147 on: September 30, 2017, 02:21:04 PM »
OS from top tropicals is not legit, you'll have better luck asking some local guys on the forum maybe next year, or if anyone in CA has a fruiting tree, ask them. The OS from top tropicals is a LZ. Os generally has flat leaves and a valencia orange smell to the leaves, and the new growth is somewhat transluscent

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3928
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #148 on: September 30, 2017, 04:31:19 PM »
WOW this thread has been a wealth of knowledge to read through as a very new SoCal Mango guy. I currently have 4 mangos in the ground and room for about six more :) I want to take the time and transition everything to Manila root stock myself. My question is if I have several Manila root stock plants that I bought from Lowes should I plant these trees in there permanent locations right now or leave them in there pots and graft/plant them in spring?   

Also on a separate issue Toptropicals website is posting that they have Orange Sherbet grafted trees for sale is there any possibility that this could be legit?

For your Manilla Mango trees, it depends on your climate. Do you get frost? If you Mango trees can survive outdoors unprotected, I would immediately plant them now so they can establish a bit before Winter hits. If you do get frost, I would wait until after the last frost date to plant.

Simon

greenbean88

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • USA, Trabuco Canyon, CA, Zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #149 on: October 01, 2017, 10:45:39 PM »
Thank you Annona and Simon for your responses. Simon I do not think that my area gets frost but that got me thinking what defines frost? Is it a temperature or actual frozen water that covers the ground/plants?
Erik

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers