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Author Topic: For you outdoor growers who have a wind problem....here's my solution.  (Read 604 times)

Mark in Texas

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My farm is located on a south facing hill that is subject to high winds, especially spring and summer.  3 days ago we had gusts in the 40's for example. So, about 10 years ago I planted 16" tall liners of Leyland Cypress and Arizona cypress C. "Carolina Saphhire" and "Silver Smoke" to shield my fruit trees and veggie garden.  These have grown to 20' H and as much across.  Afghan pine seedlings were planted in between and have been smothered out.  Once established, the 2nd year, they require little to no water, love drought, are pest free.  Highly recommend these for any place that isn't a wet area and has constant high humidity.





spaugh

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Very cool Mark.  You have good things going on there.  I have a lot of pine trees here.  They do take some water though.  Our average rainfall is probably half or less than yours and its hit and dry.  Eucalyptus is maybe a better choice here.  But all of it will explod in case of a wildfire.

Mark in Texas

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Very cool Mark.  You have good things going on there.  I have a lot of pine trees here.  They do take some water though.  Our average rainfall is probably half or less than yours and its hit and dry.  Eucalyptus is maybe a better choice here.  But all of it will explod in case of a wildfire.

Yep, they're full of sap....but also water.  I once had thousands of pines in my Xmas tree biz, down to maybe 600.  Luckily we have a wonderful volunteer FD about 2 miles away.

Love eucalyptus!

ScottR

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Nice wind break Mark, but be aware that Leylandii Cypress only last about 25 years or so and get very leggy if not pruned annually!
The last big storm we had here on Central Coast with gusts of up to 71 miles a hour from South east blew over many tree's!!! Big Eucalyptus and many Leylandii Cypress!!! Neighbor in front of me has been cutting down all his L. Cypress he's afraid of them falling on house.I've watched the Leylandii Cypress for 25 yrs. plus around my property neighbors on side and both property's in front of me were surrounded in them by developer who built houses on those property's. I've been on my place for last 40yrs. and watching them all come down slowly but surely! 

palmtreeluke

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here in south florida we have been planting eucalyptus torreliana, actually its Corymbia torreliana. a more tropical rainforest eucalyptus. it is used as a windbreak around many of the citrus groves.

I also like it as it flowers and produces large nectar flows which my bees can benefit from and make honey as well. we just planted out 2 ft trees from 1 gals should be interesting to see how they grow.
Heirloom sugar cane and Juicers: www.greenplanetfarm.com

palmcity

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I phoned fnai.org about their invasive list and was told that it is their list of plants that they believe may become invasive and yes eucalyptus torelliana is the same plant as corymbia torelliana. The word Eucalyptus is more familiar in Florida as a potentially invasive plant to most Floridians.
I did not want anyone to get in trouble if it was an enforceable list and fnai.org said it is not enforceable as far as they know. Planting Eucalyptus torreliana is still up to the individual as far as I know in Florida and I know of no state laws preventing the planting. However, state, county,city, homeowner associations, etc., or federal laws/rules may exist that I am unaware of.

http://fnai.org/InvasivesInfoPages.cfm
http://fnai.org/Invasives/Eucalyptus_torelliana_FNAI.pdf
https://keyserver.lucidcentral.org/weeds/data/media/Html/corymbia_torelliana.htm



http://keys.trin.org.au/key-server/data/0e0f0504-0103-430d-8004-060d07080d04/media/Html/taxon/Corymbia_torelliana.htm
Corymbia torelliana = Synonyms Eucalyptus torelliana F.Muell., Fragm. 10: 106(1877)
« Last Edit: March 27, 2017, 11:27:10 AM by palmcity »

Mark in Texas

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Nice wind break Mark, but be aware that Leylandii Cypress only last about 25 years or so and get very leggy if not pruned annually!

Never pruned these, in fact you'll screw them up if you do.  I use them as Christmas trees and yes those get sheared twice a year.....but that's apples and orangeLeylandii's.

Once staked their big roots will go to China. They anchor well in my clay loam and I've had 6" rain and straight line winds.

Something you're doing is not right.  Perhaps it's your sand?

Do these look leggy to you?  I planted pines at the same time in between.  They have been choked out.



25 years or so?  Could care less.  I'll be in a retirement home by then.

For stately trees that will go to 500 yrs. + I put in dozens of oaks and maple.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2017, 12:02:38 PM by Mark in Texas »

pineislander

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Sorry But...Unfortunately they appear to be the same... I am compelled to post so others do not accidentally plant INVASIVE SPECIES... i will be happy to remove this post if you prove me wrong or choose to delete your post so people do not accidentally plant INVASIVE SPECIES for a wind break in South Florida.

University of Florida has been promoting this hard working immigrant for citrus windbreaks for several years
http://www.crec.ifas.ufl.edu/extension/greening/PDF/establishing_windbreaks_story.pdf

palmcity

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University of Florida has been promoting this
http://www.crec.ifas.ufl.edu/extension/greening/PDF/establishing_windbreaks_story.pdf


Thanks for the information and updated prior post.

 

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