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Author Topic: What's wrong with my Kesar Mango  (Read 739 times)

swapnil.tailor

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What's wrong with my Kesar Mango
« on: September 07, 2017, 12:31:51 PM »
I recently purchased kesar mango and put it under shadow of another tree. But for some reason the top of the plant is getting black. Not sure if it's showing the tree is slowly dying or lacking water/nutrients. Any suggestions to fix it?






gozp

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Re: What's wrong with my Kesar Mango
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2017, 12:48:17 PM »
Dieback. Prune it

simon_grow

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Re: What's wrong with my Kesar Mango
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2017, 05:02:50 PM »
What rootstock is that on? If it's a Florida Turpentine rootstock tree, that's pretty typical dieback, could be Phomopsis. I wouldn't be surprised if the newer growth got stung by a sharpshooter which introduced spores to cause the dieback. All my Florida Turpentine rootstock trees have at lest some dieback, I don't even bother trimming it back anymore. The trees can still grow fine if you have dieback as long as you keep it healthy. Make sure you don't overwater and make sure your tree gets enough Manganese.

I would suggest planting some Lavern Manilla mango seedlings from Home Depot and then grafting with scions from your other tree when the Manilla rootstock has established.

Simon

swapnil.tailor

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Re: What's wrong with my Kesar Mango
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2017, 12:30:58 AM »
Not sure which rootstock but bought it from ebay (tropicaltreasure-us) and shipped from Florida so could be Florida Turpentine. I have pruned it for now, hoping it won't die back further.
What is the good fertilizer to make sure it has enough manganese? I have planted it with Organic potting soil bought from Costco.

simon_grow

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Re: What's wrong with my Kesar Mango
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2017, 12:15:49 AM »
A lot of the organic soils have too much organics and not enough other stuff such as sand, pumice or hardened clay type material for fast drainage. Organic soils sink a lot due to microbial activity and natural decomposition from detritovores and it often also retains too much moisture unless water levels are monitored closely. Organic soils can be great, especially for vegetables and seasonal crops but it's not so great for trees.

After about 1 year, you will notice a significant drop in the soil level because the organics have been consumed or decomposed and and the remaining organics, probably high in lignins has better drainage but has lost much of its moisture retention properties which can be good if you water and fertilize properly but it can also be bad if you think this soil can be treated in the same manner as you treated it when it was fresh.

You can purchase fast draining soils for tropicals at many of the larger nurseries but if you tend to overwater your trees, it would be a good idea to add about 33% pumice or if you live in a windy area you can add 33% Turface MVP which is hardened clay.

Southern Ag Citrus nutritional spray is good if you are good at keeping to regular fertilization schedules but their Palm spray has more Manganese. The Dyna grow foliage pro and Gro Power is also very good.

Simon


AnnonaMangoLord45

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Re: What's wrong with my Kesar Mango
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2017, 01:50:55 AM »
Actually, I believe the organisms in organically rich soils are eating up the roots themselves, I have a florida turpentine rootstock pickering mango and the only dieback I see is on the branches that were exposed to the great ungodly sun. With my Low organic content soils, I get stunning root growth, but growth that has 2x larger leaves than compost grown plants. When i went to feel the soil under my cherimoya, the part that i changed half the soil had feeder roots that were going crazy, the compost area had little to no roots in it, other than the sparse few that were clinging to life. Phomopsis and other root rot diseases are caused by low oxygen, either by compost bacteria and fungi eating the oxygen up, or being submerged for over 2 weeks. Compost tends to decompose faster in heat wave conditions. If you look at peat bogs, you will see that nothing grows there except shallow rooted plants and moss. This stuff is toxic I tell you. Perhaps due to the weakness of Florida Rootstocks, they are more susceptible to low oxygen conditions, while manila mango seedlings do somewhat ok due to their native areas being more claylike and perhaps being stronger due to their adaptation to the Californian climate. I water my pomegranate 3x day and its been nothing but vigorous, as I do with citrus, avocado, lychee, atemoya, etc. If you look at a local farm, you see that they water 18x a day, also if that were the case(too much water) how would things grow in Hilo, Hawaii, or swamps in the first place? Elephant Ears are submerged for over a year in their native environment, yet if you water them 2x in a row, they rot! So that is my Theorem on compost being the sole reason for the dieback. If I were you, I'd totally shake off every bit of that soil, cut back the leaves in half, put them in pure sandy loam or riverbed soil with charcoal infused in it, then putting it in shade for 3 months, and wait to see the beautiful results. Many plants like durian are not feasible due to the compost rotting them out a year or two later. That's why you see many plants like cassias and gardenias not being able to grow anymore. Back in the old days, they used redwood sawdust, which is pretty slow decomposing, compared to the fir bark trash. In nature, compost is only on the top as mulch, not in the soil! Orangeries in France were shown to have 97 percent sand. Also, if you look at ancient Chinese and Japanese texts about growing things in pots, you will see zero mentions of compost! Durians absolutely loath compost, and when digging around the cloudforest forum for some info, I found that they would die in the summer, the winters don't faze them at all! If Avocados hated wet feet, how come you can grow them in straight up water and not have them rot. In Conclusion, I believe you should change the soil to allow more oxygen into it, and if you want a larger tree, perhaps you should try grafting them onto a manila mango seedling for their well known vigor in this area

Sincerely, Matthew Zhou

alangr088

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Re: What's wrong with my Kesar Mango
« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2017, 04:42:05 PM »
That happened to me earlier this year with my Kesar as well. Pruned it and these pictures were the result of pruning. The picture with red editing was taken today and the other picture was taken July.




swapnil.tailor

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Re: What's wrong with my Kesar Mango
« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2017, 02:17:45 AM »
I pruned it and have similar growth as posted above. Will upload pic in few days as i feel it may be lacking some nutrients. Old Leaves have dry spots.

swapnil.tailor

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Re: What's wrong with my Kesar Mango
« Reply #8 on: September 20, 2017, 02:37:31 AM »
Here are the pics of my pruned Kesar with new growth. Also some of the leafs are getting dry, not sure what is the problem. Can someone identify the problem and provide what needs to be done?







swapnil.tailor

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Re: What's wrong with my Kesar Mango
« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2017, 07:45:27 PM »
Anyone who can help me with this issue? ^^

ibliz

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Re: What's wrong with my Kesar Mango
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2017, 11:29:04 PM »
Deleted
« Last Edit: September 25, 2017, 11:31:51 PM by ibliz »

sapote

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Re: What's wrong with my Kesar Mango
« Reply #11 on: September 26, 2017, 01:32:49 PM »
Don't worry. Your tree looks fine. It could be the bruises on the leaves happened during shipping and now the damaged cells dried up. It's normal.

swapnil.tailor

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Re: What's wrong with my Kesar Mango
« Reply #12 on: September 28, 2017, 12:04:00 AM »
Thanks Sapote. Feeling relief. Now hoping it survives first Bay area winter.

 

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