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Author Topic: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)  (Read 7934 times)

fruitlovers

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #25 on: June 21, 2013, 05:56:18 PM »
Beautiful fruit & tree.  I assume these are a little more tolerant of wet than mango (M indica)?

John

Unlike my mango trees, these trees are totally free of anthracnose, at least so far.....
Oscar

kh0110

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #26 on: June 21, 2013, 06:02:56 PM »
Hi Oscar
Amazing pics! Can we grow these in SoCal?

Should be tried. I think they will be trickier to get to fruit than mangos. Might be good to put them on mango rootstock? Would all be experimental.


That's exactly what I will be doing, Oscar, when your scions get here. I will also try a cocktail with a Carrie in container.

Thera

Mike T

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #27 on: June 21, 2013, 06:24:26 PM »
Oscar they color up prior to full ripeness with mayong chid so it is good to leave them on the tree a bit longer than the color would have you believe. The skin thins a bit as well and off the tree they can wrinkle a bit when they are at a good stage to eat.

gunnar429

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #28 on: December 22, 2015, 10:38:25 PM »
Oscar, did your maprang fruit the past 2 years?
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

fruitlovers

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #29 on: December 23, 2015, 12:51:00 AM »
Oscar, did your maprang fruit the past 2 years?
Yes, but only very lightly.
Oscar

Mike T

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #30 on: December 24, 2015, 07:36:20 AM »
The good thai types need a dry winter with a drop in temperature to below say 14c on a few occasions at least to produce heavily.They are heavy croppers here with fruit spotting bugs the thing that reduces yields.

gunnar429

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #31 on: December 24, 2015, 07:39:15 AM »
The good thai types need a dry winter with a drop in temperature to below say 14c on a few occasions at least to produce heavily.They are heavy croppers here with fruit spotting bugs the thing that reduces yields.

Seems like Maprang would do well here, as that describes our "normal" winter to a T. 
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

Mike T

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #32 on: December 24, 2015, 07:46:57 AM »
They won't enjoy temps that go down to freezing or close to it but I think they have more cold tolerance than what coom on beliefs suggest.They are very much like small mango trees in appearance and fruit ripen before the first mangoes do,which is the end of spring here.I have sent seeds to Florida before and don't know if any are going ok.

gunnar429

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #33 on: December 24, 2015, 08:35:00 AM »
They won't enjoy temps that go down to freezing or close to it but I think they have more cold tolerance than what coom on beliefs suggest.They are very much like small mango trees in appearance and fruit ripen before the first mangoes do,which is the end of spring here.I have sent seeds to Florida before and don't know if any are going ok.

Thanks, Mike.  The tree I have seen, and the stuff I have read/heard seems to point to problems with weak roots.  It supposedly can be grafted onto mango, but all attempts that I know of have failed.  Hopefully, people are still working on solving it--they are beautiful fruit and sound delicious!
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

gunnar429

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #34 on: December 24, 2015, 08:35:53 AM »
Mike T, what is your personal preference in terms of variety (Kai, Mayong Chid, etc)
~Jeff

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Mike T

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #35 on: December 24, 2015, 08:42:21 AM »
I don't know what Kai really is but think it could be a type of wan.I like the big wan types because they are the sweetest but the larger mayon chid lines are good and have more tang.People seem divided on which is better of these.Ones not from Thailand originally are too sour.

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #36 on: December 24, 2015, 08:59:57 AM »
They won't enjoy temps that go down to freezing or close to it but I think they have more cold tolerance than what coom on beliefs suggest.They are very much like small mango trees in appearance and fruit ripen before the first mangoes do,which is the end of spring here.I have sent seeds to Florida before and don't know if any are going ok.

Thanks, Mike.  The tree I have seen, and the stuff I have read/heard seems to point to problems with weak roots.  It supposedly can be grafted onto mango, but all attempts that I know of have failed.  Hopefully, people are still working on solving it--they are beautiful fruit and sound delicious!

I question the true ability of being able to be grafted onto M. indica (or there is a trick that is not made "public").  I wont say where but I have seen beautiful thriving and fruiting specimens in Palm Beach County.   Unfortunately they sre seedlings and fruit quality was not what i would say is a must have.  Hopefully the ones Mike describes are of much better eating quality.
- Rob

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #37 on: December 24, 2015, 09:11:59 AM »
They won't enjoy temps that go down to freezing or close to it but I think they have more cold tolerance than what coom on beliefs suggest.They are very much like small mango trees in appearance and fruit ripen before the first mangoes do,which is the end of spring here.I have sent seeds to Florida before and don't know if any are going ok.

Thanks, Mike.  The tree I have seen, and the stuff I have read/heard seems to point to problems with weak roots.  It supposedly can be grafted onto mango, but all attempts that I know of have failed.  Hopefully, people are still working on solving it--they are beautiful fruit and sound delicious!

I question the true ability of being able to be grafted onto M. indica (or there is a trick that is not made "public").  I wont say where but I have seen beautiful thriving and fruiting specimens in Palm Beach County.   Unfortunately they sre seedlings and fruit quality was not what i would say is a must have.  Hopefully the ones Mike describes are of much better eating quality.

Have you heard anything about how excaliburs grafts are doing? So far the tree seems easy to grow in the ground for me. I still have only gotten one lone fruit from my tree but it's only 6ft tall. Grows painfully slow though. I am kind of wondering if it is just permanently stunted from the bare rooting and shipping years ago.
I have had no luck trying to graft onto mango stock. Even approach grafts failed. I'm going to try a couple airlayers this spring.

bsbullie

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #38 on: December 24, 2015, 09:34:59 AM »
The ones at Excalibur that Sheehan spoke of have only been potted up from their bare root trip over from Thailand for about a month or so. 

As to the fruiting trees i spoke of, they a re not very tall, maybe 7 feet but very well branched and bushy.
- Rob

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #39 on: December 24, 2015, 01:36:20 PM »
As far as varietal names go, the different flavor profiles and such, and size...several sources said that for the most part, there is the one they call mayong chid, which has the sweet/little sour flavor that most people prefer.  The other they call just maprang.  It is smaller than mayong chid and basically just sweet.  Then people started jumping on the variety name bandwagon...Kai, Wan...and now there are even more.  They started giving names after their own, a province, a farm.  Some claim this or that, but they are basically the same trees producing the same fruit.  So, according to many of the folks who grow and sell them for a living, if it is not a mayong chid, its a maprang.  I brought home 3 of each and unfortunately lost all 3 maprangs.

Mike T

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #40 on: December 24, 2015, 03:27:47 PM »
The thai trinomial system means the location they come from often gets put on the end.They are all maprang then the second name is sour,sour to sweet when ripe or sweet. Sour,mayon chid and Wan are the 3 classes not varieties as there is variation within each of these 3 classes.They call the whole lot maprang.
One of mine is maprang Wan ubon.Some Wan lines can be well over 100g so can't be differentiated from mayon chid by size.As both Wan and mayon chid can vary in shape,colour and size you can't tell them apart by appearance just taste.

fruitlovers

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Maprang (Bouea macrophylla) Bumper Crop 2017
« Reply #41 on: March 20, 2017, 05:02:13 AM »
After 4 years of fruiting the trees, both Kai and Mayong Chid maprangs, finally get into heavy gear with a heavy cropings.
Kai Tree:





Mayong Chid Tree:



Oscar

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #42 on: March 20, 2017, 03:09:16 PM »
Oscar et al: How to you prune your maprangs: do you tip-prune your young maprangs like you would a young mango to encourage more tips forming? or have you just let it grow naturally? it seems slower growing than mango and less vigorous, but it also seems to branch more naturally, so I'm hesitant to start cutting the tips of mine even though they're about 4ft tall. Thanks. F.
Federico
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fruitlovers

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #43 on: March 20, 2017, 04:29:07 PM »
They're slow till they get 5-6 feet tall, but then really take off. You can prune them same way as mango once they take off.
Oscar

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #44 on: March 20, 2017, 05:19:49 PM »
The trees look wonderful and very healthy.  Incredible.

fsanchez2002

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #45 on: March 22, 2017, 12:20:09 PM »
They're slow till they get 5-6 feet tall, but then really take off. You can prune them same way as mango once they take off.

Thanks that's very helpful!
Federico
Homestead, FL

fruitlovers

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #46 on: May 05, 2017, 04:52:31 AM »
Eating lots of maprangs now, both Kai and Mayong Chid. Have been really enjoying them. They have a nice full flavor, really thirst quenching, and satisfying. Gave them to several people and they all really liked them also. One person told me it's one of the best fruits they ever had. Another person said they kind of tasted like apricots, and yes i think there is something to that, except they are more tart than an apricot. The tartness seems to be mostly in the skin, so peeling them would make them sweeter, but i haven't done that as i really enjoy full range of tastes it has.
The best news for me is that they are totally anthracnose resistant, not a single spot on any of the fruits. Asnthracnose is a big problem here on the mangoes. The maprangs also keep really well. Had some out of the fridge for a week with little problem. In fridge i'm sure they would keep a very long time. Also the trees are very productive once they get old enough. I think this fruit has a lot of commercial promise here.
The mayong chid is a couple of weeks later in production than the Kai. The fruits are the size and shape of a large chicken. If it weren't for the color they could from a distnce be confused with eggs. You can see 2 brown eggs in the back of the photo for scale and comparison:

Oscar

Mike T

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #47 on: May 05, 2017, 05:28:37 AM »
They have been a backyard tree in my area since at least the 70's and I have never understood why they are not more popular or commercial. Mayon chid picked ripe and left until it wrinkles a bit has quite edible skin that thins. There are ways of cooking them for dessert  and trees can have really big crops. People with productive trees value them highly and park trees always get raided. Maprang is a worthwhile fruit. 

fruitlovers

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #48 on: May 05, 2017, 06:40:34 AM »
They have been a backyard tree in my area since at least the 70's and I have never understood why they are not more popular or commercial. Mayon chid picked ripe and left until it wrinkles a bit has quite edible skin that thins. There are ways of cooking them for dessert  and trees can have really big crops. People with productive trees value them highly and park trees always get raided. Maprang is a worthwhile fruit.
i c
Maprang is almost totally unknown here. Hopefully i can change that a bit.
Oscar

Sam

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Re: First Fruiting and Tasting of Maprang (Bouea macrophylla)
« Reply #49 on: May 05, 2017, 07:58:24 AM »
Guys,

Are these normally propagated from seed and if so, are they true from seed?

Are they similar to ungrafted mango in terms of years to reach bearing age (~ 7?)


Regards,
Sam

 

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