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Messages - Triloba Tracker

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 35
1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Tree planted too shallow?
« on: January 19, 2019, 01:48:41 PM »
Thanks guys!
Usually I tend to be a ďfixerĒ when it comes to plants but in this case Iím strangely feeling like letting it go. Weíll see...

PS yes I agree in general better to be shallow than deep.

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Tree planted too shallow?
« on: January 19, 2019, 12:07:51 PM »
In the spring of 2018 I planted this one year old Asimina triloba seedling.

I guess I was a little sloppy and didnít get it deep enough and/or the potting mix settled a bit.

Either way, some roots are exposed near the base of the trunk.

The tree seems healthy enough - it doubled in size in its first year in the ground.

The roots have mostly lignified by now.

Any reason to do anything about this, and if so, what would it be?





3
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Tree planted too shallowly (?)
« on: January 19, 2019, 10:26:43 AM »
In the spring of 2018 I planted this one year old pawpaw seedling.

I guess I was a little sloppy and didnít get it deep enough and/or the potting mix settled a bit.

Either way, some roots are exposed near the base of the trunk.

The tree seems healthy enough - it doubled in size in its first year in the ground.

The roots have mostly lignified by now.

Any reason to do anything about this, and if so, what would it be?





4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Are there any low-light fruiting plants?
« on: January 17, 2019, 01:53:29 PM »
Maybe not a large amount of fruit and the fruit is more of a novelty, but Monstera deliciosa/Ceriman grows in heavy to dappled shade.
Plants are available at garden centers I got a $10 pot at Home Depot which divided up into 10 new plants. They may take a year or more to mature and a year to ripen after flowering.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRL6xzDmiJY

Thatís what I was going to suggest. Donít know if Iíd put them in a novelty category, have you eaten one?  I mean I get why you might, but OMG one of the best tasting fruits Iíve ever eaten.

Agree - Monstera is great eatin' in my opinion

5
Oolie, Can you share sources for this information?

pemmican, a Native American food, I would consider an aged protein.
From Wikipedia: ďTraditionally, pemmican was prepared from the lean meat of large game such as bison, elk, deer, or moose. The meat was cut in thin slices and dried, either over a slow fire or in the hot sun until it was hard and brittle. . . The resulting mixture was then packed into rawhide bags for storage. It can be stored for a maximum of 10 years.ď

Certainly caution should always be exercised when taking any medicinal substance, herbal or Otherwise

6
I recently posted this question to OurFigs.com but wanted to tap the brain trust here too....

I recently went to dig-up a dormant Celeste fig that was in the ground for 2 summers (unfortunately I didn't plan well and need to move it).

I found that 4 of the shoots, 1-inch+ in diameter each, had rooted themselves into the mulch and organic matter just clear of the main root crown.

I carefully cut the shoots from the main crown and unearthed as many of their own roots as i could - each had a fairly significant root system of its own. I trimmed the cuttings to about 10 inches or so in total length. (is this too long for the cuttings?)

I chucked them in pots with a peat/bark "nursery" style potting mix and wrapped the exposed shoots in parafilm.

My main question is----what now? Should I bring them indoors to a room-temp environment and or keep them more 40-50 degree temps until spring?

I really don't know what i'm doing  ;D

7
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Best Persimmon tree to buy
« on: December 30, 2018, 06:40:05 PM »
Rojo Brillante is astringent. And widely regarded as one of the best.
And available here in the US. Just Fruits and Exotics carries them in the fall.

If you dont have Saijo yet, it is a MUST HAVE. Also astringent and exceptionally flavored. Another one to have is Nikita's gift: which has a rich flavor and also very sweet.

Dumb question-How big do these get?

8
Wow, that's really cool. Happy for you - Merry Christmas! LOL

Stupid question - don't even tropical plants need some "night?"

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Dense passion fruit planting
« on: December 19, 2018, 01:46:23 PM »
Good to know that members are successfully growing different varieties of passion fruit vines as close as 2'. I am planning to plant purple (Federick) and yellow varieties 2-3' apart above ground with open bottom rootbuilder II pots, and let them grow on 2'x70' privacy fence.

I should point out - one big difference with incarnata is that it dies back to the ground every winter. So my space concerns are only limited to what it can do in one summer.

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Dense passion fruit planting
« on: December 19, 2018, 12:39:56 PM »
I have basically the exact same setup (two 16-ft cattle panels end-to-end, set up as a "fence").

I grow Passiflora incarnata and I have mine spaced very close....about 2 feet max apart.

Like others have said, they grow into each other. I do think they could probably benefit from a little more space, but at the same time they grow vigorously and produce plenty of fruit for me.

If i expand my collection i will plant maybe like 4 feet apart.

My only minor issue is that they reach the top of the fence and then kind of make a curtain going back down both sides. So the fruits can easily get caught in the tangle of vines and rot. I have thought about trying to make a "T" or "Y" out of my trellis by putting horizontal or slightly angled trellising across the top so the fruits could safely drop. But not sure if I'll bother.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: la fruta exotica complicada de conseguir
« on: December 14, 2018, 03:22:01 PM »
Bienvenidos!

Lodoicea maldivica?

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fire in the Hole!!!!!
« on: December 14, 2018, 03:19:10 PM »
Thanks for the thoughts!

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fire in the Hole!!!!!
« on: December 14, 2018, 02:15:54 PM »
No thoughts, pointing and laughing, or even nasty heckling in response?

14
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: ArrayŠn, Luma apiculata
« on: December 08, 2018, 01:16:41 PM »
Very interesting- thanks for sharing. Iíd never heard of this before.

15
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Best Persimmon tree to buy
« on: December 08, 2018, 10:29:59 AM »
Prok is a cold hardy variety that is well regarded but itís astringent.

16
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Best Persimmon tree to buy
« on: December 07, 2018, 01:19:08 PM »
Cool!
yeah i have not tasted a LOT of non-astringent types, so I'm no expert.

What I said above is just my current position :)   Everyone has their own tastes for sure!

17
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Best Persimmon tree to buy
« on: December 07, 2018, 11:32:26 AM »
My issue with non-astringent persimmons is they are NOT flavorful, just sweet.
By contrast, even wild American Persimmons have an amazing, complex flavor when past the astringent stage.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Fire in the Hole!!!!!
« on: December 05, 2018, 03:09:16 PM »
I've worked myself into a little paranoia around overwintering fungal spores carried by dead leaves.

A few of my trees were hit hard with Diplocarpon fungus and naturally their leaves fell to the mulched area around the tree base.

Of course i have removed the dead leaves (pretty religiously), but my paranoid mind is thinking they have shed trillions of nasty spores onto the wood mulch, and these will infect the plant next season.

So i had the crazy idea of torching the area with my Weed Dragon flamethrower. It's one of the "homeowner" ones, not super high-powered.

So here are my questions:
1) is my paranoia unfounded? i.e. Is removing the dead leaves good enough?
2) would the quick heat even kill spores anyway?
3) would it damage shallow feeder roots of the tree?

I guess I could remove all the mulch under the tree and replace with clean mulch, but clearly that's a lot of work and more expense (though not totally out of the question).


19
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Cocktail-grafting Muscadines
« on: December 02, 2018, 11:54:44 AM »
 Yes, I believe it came across that article in my searching. However it does not address my specific question.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Walmart mango sighting
« on: November 30, 2018, 10:54:28 AM »
I've seen mangoes labeled as NDM at international markets in Nashville. Never bought them. Also i don't have the experience to know if it's legit or not.

21
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Cocktail-grafting Muscadines
« on: November 26, 2018, 03:06:05 PM »
I have a couple of 2-year-old muscadine vines ordered from Ison's. One is Ison, one is Darlene.

I wondered about grafting other varieties onto these vines in cocktail-style, where maybe I aim to change half of each vine to another variety, thereby having 4 varieties instead of 2.

But I know nothing about grafting grapes. I tried googling grafting muscadines but everything i found was talking about propagation of entire plants, not "cocktail" grafting.

Anyone know anything about this or have any cuttings to share?

22
Having  a compost pile on top of the dirt might cause compaction and create anerobic conditions below ground.

Basically i agree - I would not do a "pile" much deeper than a foot.....nothing like a full-on compost pile like you would do if you were just trying to make compost.

23
Build compost piles on each site & the soil underneath will benefit. Organic matter will bring ph closer to neutral. The disturbance of turning the piles will eliminate weeds. In two years you should have several batches to work with.
18 day compost:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyqtnk60U_8
You might try using rings of fence wire to hold each pile together like this:

http://whatcom.wsu.edu/ag/compost/Wire%20ring%20bins.htm


This is exactly what I was going to suggest. I did this for tree sites.
Just be sure you do not till-in the organic matter itself into the backfill when you plant the trees. Pull the compost away to the bare soil, plant the tree, and you could then return a top-dressing layer of an inch or 2 of the compost.

I do not believe in amending native soil.
 The only similar thing i have done is to dig-in elemental sulfur to the future planting site to lower pH. Some would probably not even suggest this.

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Eggs deposited in bark...
« on: November 16, 2018, 08:50:09 AM »
I would trim that part off, place the cut end in a cup with moist paper towel, and then place in something like a small butterfly enclosure, and seal it up well. Then, see what hatches out of those eggs. You likely have more of them around, could be beneficial to figure out what they are.
Interesting idea!
Itís always hard for me to sacrifice growth but I know it would be made up for quickly. Iíll give it some thought.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Eggs deposited in bark...
« on: November 16, 2018, 07:27:16 AM »
Hmm no difference. You can use the Zoom function to see closer I guess.

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