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Topics - Soren

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1
There were plenty of fruits on my two soursop trees from the Arusha selection this season, and because of the rainy weather they keep flowering with more emerging fruits. The smaller tree had around 60-65 fruits - and a few were consumed by the mouse birds. They are relatively sweet and with less fiber than other fruits I have tried.
Seeds are available for trade.!

I can add that my friend Wirsiy Fondzenyuy from Cameroon got 34 fruits in the second season from a seedling of mine - so it also performs well in other locations than East Africa.





2
I got a few seeds of this Annona sp. for trade (2 fruits). It is likely Annona neosalicifolia.

The fruit is VERY tasty - but as seen on the photo, it is small and seedy.




3
I'm cutting down a big avocado tree which in the corner between my wall and house - it was just too big and shading out too much. Any suggestions for the replacement; should be a fruit-tree with a light shade 5-7m tall - monoecious.?

4
Canarium schweinfurthii seeds available for trade. This is one of the best fruits in central Uganda, and have a nice olive taste.

Not a container tree as it grows to 40+ m.

Photos are old but all the same ;-)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jegindo/6537328319/

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Eugenia dysenterica - a winner!
« on: May 06, 2014, 03:26:27 AM »
It is always a pleasure to try a new fruit - and today I tasted Eugenia dysenterica for the first time.!



The fruit was fairly large with a beautiful yellow color. In size and form it appeared like the temperate Prunus cerasifera.



The fruit was slightly overripe and had turned a bit soft in one end - however, when I cut it open it burst and plenty of juices poured out. The skin was slightly tough, and unlike Eugenia victoriana and other Eugenia spp. there were no maggots of fruitflies in it - likely due to the skin.
It struck me immediately, that also the taste was similar to a sweet Prunus cerasifera I used to enjoy back in Denmark as a child, but with slight lemon tones to it and without the bitter after taste some Eugenia spp. suffers from.

A winner in my book.!



6
If someone is still looking for Eugenia observa seeds, I do have a limited number from 3 plants. Not for sale, only for trade. Drop me a PM.

Description from Heltons website; http://www.bananasraras.org/frutasrarasingles/eugenia9.htm

7
Last year I recieved some Cashew seeds from Thurston; and now a year later after a dry spell, one of the seedlings are flowering being slightly more than 40cm tall.



8
Tropical Fruit Online Library / Useful Trees and Shrubs for Uganda
« on: July 17, 2013, 06:08:20 AM »
Useful Trees and Shrubs for Uganda
Identification, Propagation and Management for Agricultural and Pastoral Communities
A B Katende, Ann Birnie and Bo Tengnas

This great book has been out of print for years; but can now be enjoyed online: http://www.worldagroforestry.org/downloads/publications/PDFs/B09383.PDF

9
My high-yielding Annona muricata tree has now ripe fruits (http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=1476.msg20182#msg20182), and likewise I got seeds from a single medium sized Rollinia fruit - I didn't get a photo of it, because the kids took it and eat it before I had the chance. But the seeds were spared. The size and appearance was as on this photo; http://postimg.cc/image/wb811zmer/ (of a fruit on the same tree some years back).

10
It is not every year, I manage to get Garcinia buchananii (here called Ensali) seeds for trading, but my friend Katumba just returned from Nairobi where he is taking his PhD within Forestry and to my pleasant surprise his mom had finished off a bunch of fresh fruits, while I got the seeds.
The fruit species is not common in Uganda, although it is widely distributed; it is nice but acidic and the fruits are the size of Imbe. I only got a handful, so there will not be many seeds to trade.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / 4 great fruits from Uganda
« on: May 10, 2013, 08:08:56 AM »
Today I went to National Forestry Authority just outside Kampala and spoke with some of the researchers I know; here in East Africa there is now a growing focus on native fruit species and for that reason they have decided to work on improving 4 great fruit species. The species where selected based on several criteria, mainly their great taste and from Uganda the following were chosen for the programme;

1. Chrysophyllum albidum (White Star Apple)
2. Canarium schweinfurthii
3. Vitex doniana
4. Saba comorensis

Currently they have started selling C. albidum and C. schweinfurthii seedlings; soon the others will follow as well (Saba comorensis can be propagated by cuttings as well). I look forward to the trials starting within the next months and will keep everyone posted.

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / new Eugenia ssp. from Helton
« on: May 06, 2013, 06:50:57 AM »
I am on the mailing list from Helton, and just got an updated link today with some interesting new stuff, including a bunch of rare Eugenia species - e.g. EUGENIA CALYCINA. There are also some Annona spp. etc. which I have not heard about previously....
The list with photos is here; http://www.colecionandofrutas.org/frutasdomato.htm

13
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Trade: Aframomum sp. - large fruits
« on: April 17, 2013, 02:07:00 AM »
Yesterday I bought some Aframomum sp. fruits at a local market outside Kampala; the fruits are large and have a refreshing slightly acid passionfruit taste, with a spicy twist. One of my favorite Ugandan fruits and very container friendly as well.
Seeds are available for trade with anything I don't have  ;)



Fruits


My own Aframomum in flower

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Which MYRTACEAE could this be?
« on: April 12, 2013, 07:28:06 AM »
My lack of none-African fruit litterature makes identifications difficult - found this MYRTACEAE in a hotel garden; it is not native to Uganda (I can say that much), and I suspect it could be Asian as most seedlings for parks and hotels are imported from there. The flesh of the fruits are pink-red, and the fruit is acid but acceptable.








15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Kigelia pinnata aka the sausage tree
« on: April 04, 2013, 05:59:13 AM »
Another typical tree of the African Savanna - came across many over Easter. The tree should be grown for its decorative flowers, and though the fruit is not edible as raw, it is used for brewing alcohol and the seeds are roasted  and eaten.



16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Annona senegalensis
« on: April 04, 2013, 05:50:38 AM »
During Easter I went up to Murchinson Falls national park, and it didn't take long before I spotted some trees of Annona senegalensis in flower and with fruits. Enjoy.!



Immature fruit



As above








Flowers


A leaf and my hand (which is not as big as Mikes')

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Chrysophyllum imperiale
« on: October 10, 2012, 06:14:18 AM »
Just managed to get two pre-germinated seeds of this impressive Chrysophyllum species from a friend in Brazil - I have been looking for it for a while; it is very rare in nature but do appear in collections and are curious if anyone has experience growing it.?

The photo is from the internet:


18
I got a few old oysternuts vines growing (Telfairia occidentalis or Telfairia pedata), but have recently sown some more seeds which was left after mailing to members here and on the yahoo group. As seen on the photo, the seedlings have just emerged but are rapid growing. The farmers usually sow directly in the drip line of a tall tree and train it to reach the branches of the tree. The seedpod is huge and the seeds large, long, flat and taste like sunflower seeds when fresh or almonds when roasted. The perennial vine reaching a height of up to 30 m.


Two oysternut seedlings


I will have oysternut seeds towards end of June 2015 - let me know if interested in a trade.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Some African fruits...
« on: July 26, 2012, 02:30:42 AM »
Just returning from my vacation in Denmark, I was surprised by one of my fruit sourcing contacts who showed up with a few fruit. From top left Monodora myristica (Calabash nutmeg), large Chrysophyllum albidum (White Star Apple) with a seed and finally seeds of Annona senegalensis (Wild custard apple). Enjoy - these are not easy to come by.
Sorry the photo is not in focus - I used my smartphone.


20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Guess this fruit species if you can...
« on: June 18, 2012, 09:13:36 AM »
Can anyone guess this one - just picked the sweet and tasteful fruit? And to be fair and not make it too difficult, I will provide a bit more help than what can be seen from the photo alone.

1) Native to more than one continent
2) Leaves are leathery and as seen; dark green above and more pale below
3) Not a MYRTACEAE



The keys upper left side can give an indication of size

21
I can see Myrcianthes fragrans has a natural range that extends into the southern USA; on the photos I have seen the foliage and bark looks beautiful, and the fruits are edible. Anyone with firsthand (or secondhand) knowledge about this rare species?

Found some info on; http://www.plantcreations.com/stoppers.htm

22
I got seeds available for trade from a high yielding Soursop (Annona muricata); the parent of my tree was selected out of TCDC, Arusha, Tanzania. The small tree easily carries 35+ medium sized fiber-less fruits of good eating quality and seeds have previously been shared with members from this forum (this is second fruiting this year).



23
Passed the market during my lunch break, and found a handful of fresh Canarium schweinfurthii fruits. This is one of the best fruits in central Uganda, and have a nice olive taste. Not a container tree as it grows to 40+ m.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jegindo/6537328319/#in/set-72157628482393403/

24
Can hear I am missing out on a great fruit experience. I do have both a white and red type of Annona diversifolia (thanks to Luc), but not the famous Red and White Genova, so whoever have seeds now or in the future, please sign me up on the list for seeds of either or both cultivar. Will as usual offer rare Africa fruit species in return.

25
This is a showy medium size and very drought resistant African tree, which at times can reach 20m or more. The deep taproot allows it to survive even with less than 400 mm annual rain but it will not be bothered by a much higher rainfall. It grows from Senegal into southern Sudan, including Uganda where these seeds were collected from wild populations.
It has been introduced to many of the Caribbean islands.

It was previously mislabeled as Inga biglobosa, and the pulp between the seeds is sweet and tasty, but more important it is categorized as a multipurpose tree where the seeds are fermented to make a tasty "foodball", so high in protein it can replace meat.

See http://www-public.jcu.edu.au/discovernature/plants_t/JCUPRD1_069352 for some photos of the flowers and tree.

I have enough seeds for anyone who is interested in exchange of seeds.

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