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Author Topic: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest  (Read 3115 times)

mrtexas

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #25 on: October 01, 2017, 11:39:15 AM »
On average you can grow a mango tree outside in Seattle. However it is not the averages that kill a citrus or mango tree it is the extremes and the duration of freezing weather that kill semi-tropical trees. Mangos are killed by a freeze of any duration. 0F, 6F, and 11F kill citrus trees after an hour or two. Seattle has very little citrus friendly weather with cool, rainy and cloudy the most frequent occurences. Where I live in Houston has similar weather to Bradenton,FL where they grow mangoes outside unprotected. However the yearly hard freezes prevent growing mangoes in the ground unprotected.

seattle by philip sauber, on Flickr
« Last Edit: October 01, 2017, 10:13:42 PM by mrtexas »

Citradia

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #26 on: October 01, 2017, 09:19:13 PM »
And, the reality is that if you live somewhere where it ever gets down to 5 degrees, you are going to have nights and days when it never gets above freezing, sometimes not getting above freezing for several days. If the temps don't rise above freezing when the sun comes up the morning after the cold snap, your citrus ( other than trifoliata) is in trouble.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #27 on: October 16, 2017, 04:38:10 PM »



SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #28 on: October 19, 2017, 11:28:35 PM »

Here's three of a really rare variety.
It's either ([trifoliate x Temple orange] x C. ichangensis) x Minneola Tangelo, or it's Minneola x C. ichangensis x Temple orange. There may have been a little mix up so its exact origin is in doubt.

I think this is only hardy to zone 8 but the fruit quality is supposed to be pretty good.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2017, 11:30:51 PM by SoCal2warm »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #29 on: November 03, 2017, 05:48:14 PM »
At the very end of October the temperature early morning outside was 44, 55 inside the greenhouse.
This morning, November 3, there was a surprise: the ground was covered in snow. It's very unusual for snow to fall this early in the year, usually any snowfall is preceded by two months of rain.

Here's a yuzu in the early fallen snow



SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #30 on: January 28, 2018, 05:55:54 PM »
Very unusual weather this year. Although there was snow in early November (very unusual), what's even more unusual is that so far, since then, there has not been a freeze, as far as I'm aware. Daytime temperatures have been hovering at about 46 F almost every day, maybe 41 in the night (with just a few of the coldest nights down to 36 at the lowest).
 There was a rose on my bush blooming on New Years Day with several more buds that looked about to bloom, and I also just yesterday saw several blooms on a huge camellia bush. With temperatures like this a normal citrus tree could probably be left outside unprotected (although its leaves would have gotten a little frost bitten from the freak freeze in early November). It seems while the rest of the country has been experiencing deep freezes, the West coast has been unusually mild this year.
« Last Edit: January 28, 2018, 06:00:30 PM by SoCal2warm »

Citradia

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #31 on: January 29, 2018, 09:43:39 AM »
The weather on this continent is really unpredictable. We were supposed to have a warm dry winter, but it's been the exact opposite.

Tom

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #32 on: February 01, 2018, 12:09:14 PM »
The general explanation has been that the jet stream has been moving around in unusual patterns this year. Hard to believe but a dip in the artic jet stream caused central AL to be colder than parts of Canada at the same time. Yes it has been rough and the flu seems worse too. Tom

 

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