Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?  (Read 6679 times)

Perplexed

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 39
    • USA, Georgia, Snellville, 7b-8a
    • View Profile
cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« on: September 09, 2017, 09:23:06 PM »
I live in Georgia in zone 7b. I'm wondering what types of cold hardy citrus can grow here? Clay soil is dominant in my area.

manfromyard

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 44
    • USA, Ga, 8a
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2017, 02:20:32 PM »
Hello,

Snellville is a bit outside the heat island, but I recommend Citrangequats, Ichang lemons, or Changshas on the South side of  property.
If you only have an exposed spot, a Dunstan Citrumelo or Morton Citrange should work.

If you are willing to use containers, plant anything you want, but Meyer Lemons and Satsumas will need less nights of protection.

Just temper your expectations about taste. You should probably taste a few before you plant them....

Citradia

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 568
    • USA/NC/Old Fort/6B
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2017, 09:47:51 PM »
I have Dunstan citrumelo unprotected that have survived the past two years. I think they make a decent version of a sour grapefruit. Note: it is a novelty tree to grow in cold climate without winter protection, not a store-quality fruit. It is better, more ornamental and noteworthy with larger more impressive fruit and leaves than poncirus trifoliata.
« Last Edit: November 04, 2018, 01:21:49 PM by Citradia »

Perplexed

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 39
    • USA, Georgia, Snellville, 7b-8a
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2017, 10:35:56 PM »
Do you think croxton or dragon lime can grow in my area?

Citradia

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 568
    • USA/NC/Old Fort/6B
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2017, 08:29:08 PM »
I have Croxton but I cover mine in winter and protect from severe freeze with space heater. Croxton comes from Columbia, SC which I believe is zone 8a and grows at Mckinzie Farms in Scranton, SC zone 8a, where it is protected with microsprinklers during freezing nights. I protect my grapefruit from freezing largely due to need to overwinter the fruit which takes over a year to mature in my climate. 7b you probably have hot summers so your grapefruit may be ripe enough to eat before the first hard freeze in your area. Croxton is real citrus; 7b I believe is a low of 5 degrees; I've lost citranges at 5 degrees and this past spring lost half of the height from citranges when it got down to only 14 degrees after they started waking up from a warmer winter/spring. You would have to protect Croxton or any other real citrus in 7b.

AndrewAZ

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 129
    • Scottsdale, AZ zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2017, 11:37:55 PM »
Changsha Mandarin, keraji Mandarin, bloomsweet.  All good fruit, but, probably more of a 8a/b fruit.  Need to placed in a very good microclimate and will need protection under 15.  Call Stan McKenzie, he has an awesome selection and good quality trees.

Citradia

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 568
    • USA/NC/Old Fort/6B
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2017, 08:16:48 PM »
PT and its hybrids are better suited to clay soils than regular citrus which like sandier soils. Go to Mckenzie farms.com; Stan Mckenzie has/had copies of the book called "Hardy Citrus for the Southeast ", by Tom McClendon, for sale. You could also try Ben Salley out of Columbia SC, also sells citrus; he's who I got my Croxton from, and he lives across the street from the original Croxton. His business and site on Facebook is called "Simply Citrus". I don't know if you can take citrus into GA from SC though.
« Last Edit: November 04, 2018, 01:23:36 PM by Citradia »

Delvi83

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 399
    • Italy
    • View Profile
    • Il Gusto della Natura
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2017, 02:52:07 PM »
Citrangenquat "Thomasville" could be a good choice.... :)

Florian

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 131
    • Solothurn, Switzerland.
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2017, 05:01:07 AM »
If you can get your hands on it, try Citsuma "Prague" which should be able to survive with minimal protection and you can expect edible fruit (or so they say; mine has flowered but not set fruit so far).
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=23499.0

Isaac-1

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 76
    • western Louisiana zone 8b/9a line
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2017, 05:41:51 PM »
If you are willing to provide some cold protection (covering, old style large bulb non-LED christmas lights, etc.) during hard freezes you may consider something like Arctic Frost Satsuma, a relatively recent Satsuma cross out of Texas.  https://today.agrilife.org/2015/06/10/arctic-frost-satsuma-mandarin-hybrid-named-new-texas-superstar/

The jury is still out on real world performance, though taste while perhaps less good than other Satsumas will still likely be superior to the others mentioned so far.  There are also a few varieties of citrus being planted commercially in southern Georgia see http://www.growingproduce.com/citrus/georgia-citrus-seeking-to-make-its-mark/

Delvi83

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 399
    • Italy
    • View Profile
    • Il Gusto della Natura
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2017, 05:34:47 AM »
I think Arctic Frost Satsuma has more or less the same hardiness of other Satsuma.....it's just a Marketing operation. Anyway i would choose Russian cultivar (es. Sori Satsuma)

Ilya11

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 345
    • France, Paris region, Vaux le Penil, middle of Northern z8
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #11 on: December 16, 2017, 09:10:03 AM »
Sotchi, not Sori
Two other "Russian" satsumas are available from UCR
Aguzdera and Iveria
Best regards,
                       Ilya

hardyvermont

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 19
    • Anderson SC z 8a
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #12 on: December 17, 2017, 03:57:04 PM »
Sotchi, not Sori
Two other "Russian" satsumas are available from UCR
Aguzdera and Iveria

Ilya, how cold hardy are those varieties? 

Thanks,
Alan

Ilya11

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 345
    • France, Paris region, Vaux le Penil, middle of Northern z8
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #13 on: December 18, 2017, 03:04:10 PM »
I do not have a personal experience with them, on the Black Sea Caucasian shore Iveria is known to resist -10-12C (10_14F)
Best regards,
                       Ilya

maesy

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 28
    • Lucerne, Switzerland
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #14 on: February 14, 2018, 06:06:41 AM »
Ilya, in your french forum I have seen pictures of your good crop of thomasville fruits.
What are your lows the fruits had to endure?

Ilya11

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 345
    • France, Paris region, Vaux le Penil, middle of Northern z8
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #15 on: February 14, 2018, 08:52:18 AM »
They are toasted  after few hours at -5C
Best regards,
                       Ilya

maesy

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 28
    • Lucerne, Switzerland
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2018, 10:05:17 AM »
That is also my experience.
Do you protect your tree when there is colder weather forcast?

Ilya11

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 345
    • France, Paris region, Vaux le Penil, middle of Northern z8
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2018, 11:56:27 AM »
No, never. My initial Thomasville was from B.Voss, grafted very low on poncirus. It died after -12C, but I had several of its seedlings,  they usually become damaged at approximately -10C.
It should be taken into account, that in my climate this sort of temperatures occur during long cold spells with more than one week of frozen ground.
Seedlings are coming nicely from roots after complete trunk death. Among them many are weak, having root problems, but one in 10 is growing very quickly and fruiting in 4-5 years.
I have already  their fourth generation, but  hardiness is not improving. 
Best regards,
                       Ilya

maesy

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 28
    • Lucerne, Switzerland
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #18 on: February 14, 2018, 12:12:46 PM »
Are those fruits on the picture from a four years old seedling?! Wow, thats impressive.
And the tree on the picture of 2015? Is that the mother plant?

mikkel

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 128
    • Lueneburg, Germany Zone 7
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #19 on: February 14, 2018, 05:36:13 PM »
I have already  their fourth generation, but  hardiness is not improving.
Are seedlings different from their mother or are they just copies ( not in the meaning of clones, but nearly identical)?

SoCal2warm

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 603
    • zone 10 and zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #20 on: February 14, 2018, 07:45:00 PM »
Are seedlings different from their mother or are they just copies ( not in the meaning of clones, but nearly identical)?
Seedlings can be either "zygotic" or "nucellar". Some citrus varieties produce almost entirely nucellar seed, while some produce all zygotic.
Nucellar are the ones that are genetic clones (exact copies). Certain citrus varieties tend to produce seedlings that mostly resemble the traits of their parents, even though they are zygotic and may not be exact genetic copies. Typically if an offspring is a direct hybrid between two different species of parents the offspring will be more likely to be unpredictable.

I don't know but I would imagine citrangequat would produce mostly to entirely nucellar seeds, based on the fact that both calamondin (orange x kumquat) and citrange are nucellar. (kumquat is zygotic)
« Last Edit: February 14, 2018, 07:55:58 PM by SoCal2warm »

Ilya11

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 345
    • France, Paris region, Vaux le Penil, middle of Northern z8
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #21 on: February 15, 2018, 03:41:19 AM »
Are those fruits on the picture from a four years old seedling?! Wow, thats impressive.
And the tree on the picture of 2015? Is that the mother plant?
The fruits are from second generation seedling that nearly died several times but resprouted. My grafted Thomasville died in 2005
Best regards,
                       Ilya

Ilya11

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 345
    • France, Paris region, Vaux le Penil, middle of Northern z8
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2018, 03:56:51 AM »
I have already  their fourth generation, but  hardiness is not improving.
Are seedlings different from their mother or are they just copies ( not in the meaning of clones, but nearly identical)?
Mikkel,
 Thomasville forms seeds only when cross-pollinated. The seeds contain one or several embryos, but are all nucellar. I  germinated hundreds of them, up to now found two, that could eventually turn to be mutants, but not a single hybrid.
Many of Thomasville seedlings are weak, having root problems, but it seems that this feature is not hereditary, when grafted they develop nicely.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 03:58:59 AM by Ilya11 »
Best regards,
                       Ilya

mikkel

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 128
    • Lueneburg, Germany Zone 7
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #23 on: February 15, 2018, 04:38:46 AM »
thanks Ilya!

luckycloud

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 26
    • zone 7B (NC)
    • View Profile
Re: cold hardy Citrus for zone 7b?
« Reply #24 on: February 18, 2018, 06:18:08 PM »
Hi, new here, though I've spent the past month or so scouring the web for info about hardy citrus. I'm also in 7b and recently acquired an Owari (on trifoliate roots) from Stan McKenzie. Going to put it in the ground, as I have a fairly warm microclimate (urban area, protected from wind, side of a gentle slope, etc), and plan to use a portable greenhouse, Christmas lights, water buckets, etc to even out temp extremes. I've already got a few container citrus and I love experimenting and trying fairly inadvisable things.

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers