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Author Topic: keraji mandarin  (Read 411 times)

SoCal2warm

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keraji mandarin
« on: December 20, 2017, 07:35:50 PM »
Keraji is a cold hardy Japanese mandarin with yellow-orange skin. The taste is like lemonade and the fruits are small and a bit seedy. Supposedly keraji can handle down to 12 °F.

One tree was growing outside unprotected and fruiting in Virginia Beach.

Apparently it was a fairly popular tree in the Southeast among those growing cold hardy citrus, but I can't seem to find any nurseries carrying it now.

A nursery owner in Georgia was kind enough to send me seeds


During my research I came across something interesting in a Japanese genetic analysis paper. Seems like keraji shares in common a parent with satsuma mandarin, a type of Japanese tangor called kunenbo which must be confering a degree of exceptional cold hardiness (it's a parent of bloomsweet as well). The analysis actually indicated keraji was probably a backcross of kunenbo with another sour-type citrus known as kubachi (today rather obscure, but the pictures I was able to find look similar to kabosu or sudachi).

I just read another research paper DNA analysis that says keraji appears to be a cross between kunenbo (seed parent) and kikai-mikan. I found a picture of kikai-mikan and not surprisingly the fruit looks a lot like a cross between both the pictures of kubachi and kunenbo I saw. So it looks like keraji may indeed be a backcross with kunenbo—that is (kubachi x kunenbo) x kunenbo.

For any of you who may be interested, here's the picture of kikaimikan (喜界みかん) I was able to find:


And here's here's a Japanese site showing pictures and description of Kunenbo:
http://www.michinosima.com/kaimono/kunenbo.html

The name Kunenbo translates as "nine year mother". The fruits appear pretty similar to a Kara mandarin. (One of Kara's parents is Satsuma, and Satsuma is a Kunenbo cross with Kishu. Kara is also pretty cold hardy and grows in frosty areas of Japan. Maybe that's giving too much information here)

I suspect there might be different cultivars of keraji as well, with slightly different qualities when it comes to edibility/flavor, if these plants have been propagated at some point from seed. The seeds seemed pretty big like they would be really easy to grow, so that may be likely.

Well that's pretty funny, I start a thread about keraji and show you pictures of its entire lineage of obscure parents but don't show you a picture of keraji itself. Well, there are plenty of pictures of keraji mandarin on the internet so you don't need me to post that there.













AndrewAZ

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2017, 11:08:15 PM »
Does anyone else have keraji seeds to share?  I love the fruit.  Willing to pay or trade.

Walt

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2017, 12:59:06 PM »
Looks like I'll be getting  keraji  too.

SoCal2warm

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2017, 02:30:24 PM »
Looks like I'll be getting  keraji  too.
I'm not sure why you'd want to have keraji. It's not going to be able to survive outside in Kansas, zone 6. And the fruit quality is not going to be anywhere as good as regular mandarins.
Keraji might be of more interest to someone in climate zone 8a.

I know you're planning to use it in your hybridization attempts, but in zone 6 you may be better off just breeding trifoliate with regular citrus. Keraji doesn't have anywhere near the same cold hardiness as a citrange, for example. I think you wouldn't be bad off just using Satsuma mandarin in your hybridization instead.

Ilya11

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2017, 04:10:16 AM »
Keraji is more cold resistant than Morton citrange.
Best regards,
                       Ilya

Sylvain

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2017, 05:04:58 AM »
> From what I know precocious flowering gene in poncirus is recessive
> I agree with you about those recessive genes, Walt.
I received them as seeds and all the seedling flowered  one and half year later.
But it doesn't prove it is not recessive because all the seeds could be nucellare.

Walt

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2018, 02:18:29 PM »
While I am using citranges and citandarins in my breeding  Even they must be inside during my winters.  Having some mandarins inside to keep me company during the winter is not a problem.  None of my citranges are from modern breeding.  Having the most hardy mandarines in my breeding populations seems a good idea to me.
Crossing the most cold-hardy mandarins available with the rather new, new to me at least, better flavored P. trifoliata is worth doing.

 

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