Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Moving to a warmer country?  (Read 178 times)

Jeppe

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • Denmark
    • View Profile
Moving to a warmer country?
« on: February 07, 2018, 08:45:43 AM »
Hi, what wonderful forum that i have stumbled upon!
I am in my early twenties and still haven't really figured life out at all.
One thing i know is that i love tropical fruits, and i really wish i could grow them. I live in Denmark where it gets quite cold in the winter, I've tried growing cantaloupe indoors, but i only got 1 ripe fruit, but it tasted so incredible.

I have been thinking about moving to a hotter climate a lot, I would love to be able to grow mangoes, cantaloup melons and oranges which are my absoulte favourite, do you have any recommendation where i should guide my eyes towards? I think having a concrete goal would help me achieve it.

I'm thinking both in where the fruit will thrive the most, but also where it might be feasible to move to as a foreigner.

Kind regards
Jeppe

cmichael258

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 628
    • St. Pete, Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Moving to a warmer country?
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2018, 08:55:18 AM »
How about Florida?
Michael

Triloba Tracker

  • Pawpaw Crazy Person
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 729
  • Rom. 1:20
    • USA, Middle Tennessee, Zone 7a
    • View Profile
Re: Moving to a warmer country?
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2018, 09:40:54 AM »
Welcome, Jeppe!

Are you looking at European destinations only or are you considering other continents?

Also, mangoes, cantaloupes and oranges have different climate ranges. For example, Cantaloupe grows great here where I am (Tennessee, USA) but mangoes and oranges would not (outdoors).

If you want mangoes you will have to be some place pretty warm. In the USA that would mean mid to southern Florida, parts of California (I believe) south Texas perhaps......I'm not a mango expert. But it would have to be somewhere without frost or at least very rare frost.

I love your enthusiasm and would like to hear more from you!

P.S. I would not be living up to my name if I didn't suggest you try growing Asimina triloba (north american pawpaw). It's a cold-hardy fruit with a definite tropical flavor and texture!!
Jus crazy bout dem pawpaws!

KarenRei

  • Arctic Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1421
    • Reykjavk, Iceland
    • View Profile
Re: Moving to a warmer country?
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2018, 10:42:41 AM »
Hi Jeppe - greetings from Iceland  :)

It should be pointed out that there's no place you can grow everything. Some plants love humidity, others hate it.  Some need a monsoon climate, others can't stand it.  Some need cool winters or nights, others don't withstand them.  Etc.  And don't even get started on soil requirements! 

From your list, it sounds like a Mediterranean climate would suit you well; no need to move that far from home  :).  Just don't go somewhere that tends to get water shortages.   I'd recommend any of the areas in green, preferably light green here (map of minimum winter temperatures):

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e0/NWS-NOAA_Europe_Extreme_minimum_temperature_JAN_22_-_28%2C_2017.png


I'd cross-reference with this map, which is the rent per hectare on farmland in Europe:

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/images/e/e8/Weighted_average_value_of_the_rent_per_ha_of_agricultural_land_paid_by_holding_%28EUR_per_ha%29%2C_2006-2008%2C_EUR-27%2C_NUTS_2.png


(In case you were thinking about tropicals in western Norway, remember that you also need enough summer heat for growth  ;)  )

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2e/NWS-NOAA_Europe_Extreme_maximum_temperature_JUL_5_-_11%2C_2015.png


Do however remember that life is about more than farming. Pick a country whose political and economic situations are one that you're content with. I recommend talking with locals. :)
« Last Edit: February 07, 2018, 02:06:49 PM by KarenRei »
J, g er a rkta surnar plntur slandi. Nei, g er ekki klikku. Jja, kannski...

Triloba Tracker

  • Pawpaw Crazy Person
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 729
  • Rom. 1:20
    • USA, Middle Tennessee, Zone 7a
    • View Profile
Re: Moving to a warmer country?
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2018, 12:30:04 PM »
Count on Karen for thorough and detailed info, every time  ;D

Until you get to move, you can look for tasty things that might survive in your climate.

That's kind of what I did. I gave up on trying to zone-shift and found temperate relatives to tropical fruits I love: pawpaw (as I mentioned) but also Passiflora incarnata. For me these aren't just temperate, they grow wild here.

They both produce excellent fruits and are way less hassle than zone pushing tropicals.

Based on the maps above, these 2 would totally make it in Denmark.

« Last Edit: February 07, 2018, 12:40:28 PM by Triloba Tracker »
Jus crazy bout dem pawpaws!

Luisport

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2102
  • New in tropical fruit growing!
    • Fatima, Portugal
    • View Profile
Re: Moving to a warmer country?
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2018, 03:33:55 PM »
Well i definately recomend Madeira Island! Really great climate! Great people, food and landscape... ;D

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5yZf2Q05GaI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbVdgtu0vuI

Fruit produced on Madeira

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FW45gqQOHI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHiOQT1GGXY
« Last Edit: February 07, 2018, 03:38:04 PM by Luisport »

fruitlovers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14631
  • www.fruitlovers.com
    • USA, Big Island, East Hawaii, Zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Fruit Lover's Nursery
Re: Moving to a warmer country?
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2018, 04:05:46 PM »
When considering a move i think 3 things are very important:
1) where can you go that you will be able to get residency? For this reason Europe would be good for you as you are already citizen of the EU.
2) where can you go where you can buy or lease land at an affordable price? With this one maybe most of Europe is not so good? Latin America or SE Asia would be better, if you are willing to learn new language and try new culture?
3) Once you narrowed down the list of countries it's best to go ahead and visit in person. All the facts in the world will not do you much good if you then go to a country and simply don't like it there, or don't like the people there. So probably this is one of the most important things: being able to fit in well into that country and enjoying it.
Oscar

KarenRei

  • Arctic Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1421
    • Reykjavk, Iceland
    • View Profile
Re: Moving to a warmer country?
« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2018, 05:38:08 PM »
Well i definately recomend Madeira Island! Really great climate! Great people, food and landscape... ;D

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5yZf2Q05GaI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbVdgtu0vuI

Fruit produced on Madeira

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FW45gqQOHI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHiOQT1GGXY

Looks purdy  :)

I can vouch for life on an island with a couple hundred thousand people  ;)  I mean, it can be a hindrance sometimes being cut off (things take longer to arrive, goods sometimes become unavailable or are just in general unavailable, etc).  Example: for some reason about a month ago pecans disappeared without warning from the grocery store I usually shop at.  No problem, right - I'll just shop somewhere else.  Bnus?  No pecans.  Hagkaup?  No pecans.  Everyone simultaneously ran out of pecans; I guess there was only one supplier  ;)  And they're still not back in stores.

But on the other hand, being insulated from the rest of the world is rather comforting.  The atmosphere is more laid back.  Global geopolitics becomes more of a spectator sport.  Contrarily, you feel you have more influence on things when the population is low and isolated because it's easier to get to know other people - politicians, business leaders, artists, whoever. If you find life too stressful in Denmark, "remote island life" might be more your thing.  :)
J, g er a rkta surnar plntur slandi. Nei, g er ekki klikku. Jja, kannski...

fruitlovers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14631
  • www.fruitlovers.com
    • USA, Big Island, East Hawaii, Zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Fruit Lover's Nursery
Re: Moving to a warmer country?
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2018, 07:15:52 PM »
Islands also perfect for growing tropicals. They like that moderated influence of surrounding ocean. Temperautres don't vary much between night and day....and that's what most tropicals like.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2018, 04:15:40 PM by fruitlovers »
Oscar

Luisport

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2102
  • New in tropical fruit growing!
    • Fatima, Portugal
    • View Profile
Re: Moving to a warmer country?
« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2018, 04:50:57 AM »
Well i definately recomend Madeira Island! Really great climate! Great people, food and landscape... ;D

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5yZf2Q05GaI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbVdgtu0vuI

Fruit produced on Madeira

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FW45gqQOHI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHiOQT1GGXY

Looks purdy  :)

I can vouch for life on an island with a couple hundred thousand people  ;)  I mean, it can be a hindrance sometimes being cut off (things take longer to arrive, goods sometimes become unavailable or are just in general unavailable, etc).  Example: for some reason about a month ago pecans disappeared without warning from the grocery store I usually shop at.  No problem, right - I'll just shop somewhere else.  Bnus?  No pecans.  Hagkaup?  No pecans.  Everyone simultaneously ran out of pecans; I guess there was only one supplier  ;)  And they're still not back in stores.

But on the other hand, being insulated from the rest of the world is rather comforting.  The atmosphere is more laid back.  Global geopolitics becomes more of a spectator sport.  Contrarily, you feel you have more influence on things when the population is low and isolated because it's easier to get to know other people - politicians, business leaders, artists, whoever. If you find life too stressful in Denmark, "remote island life" might be more your thing.  :)
No problems in Madeira Island. That's where i like to live if i could choose... at least no cold there... it's the pearl of Atlantic Ocean!  ;D

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers