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Author Topic: "Rooting cuttings -- Can we reduce the process to its essence?"  (Read 466 times)

Vlad

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I read this thread on a fig forum. https://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-home/291461-rooting-cuttings-can-we-reduce-the-process-to-its-essence
It caused me to ask the same question about rooting citrus cuttings. From this posting: Question: What are the essential components of an environment that will cause wood to sprout? Under proper conditions, we should need no medium at all, other than air -- a stick of fig wood suspended magically in the air could sprout roots, if other conditions were suitable. If so, then everything non-essential might simply complicate the process and reduce the probability of success. The non-essentials could be eliminated, boosting the probability of success.
The poster in this thread found that fig cuttings will root without being stuck into a growth/rooting medium. Can this be true of citrus? In other words, what are the essential conditions required for rooting citrus cuttings?

Millet

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Re: "Rooting cuttings -- Can we reduce the process to its essence?"
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2018, 04:27:20 PM »
The writer makes assumptions that are not  necessarily true.  ex. " the stick of fig wood doesn't "know" that it sits in any material at all. The stick is blind, deaf, and dumb"   

 "everything non-essential might simply complicate the process and reduce the probability of success"   I assume the writers list of no essential items means all  items commonly used by the rooting industry.  My reply: I think the proper word in this sentence is helps and not complicate.

I'm imagining a possible set-up including (1) a sterilized plastic box, (2) 2-3" of perlite, (3) 1/4" of perched water; (4) a rack, like the ones used to hold test tubes, placed on top of the perlite, (5) cuttings, cleaned with bleach or peroxide, standing upright the rack, (6) a warm location. We could, of course, add a biocide targeting bacteria and/or mold.  My reply:  The above sentence sounds much like the common rooting process.  He writes about rooting only in air (with humidity, oxygen, heat) yet uses is a very common rooting medium (perlite) and rooting process.

Can this be true of citrus? Vlad, you probably have already guessed the answer.

Comment:  A major reason for the failure of a cutting not rooting is because the cutting being selected was lacking enough stored energy .
« Last Edit: April 15, 2018, 09:08:11 PM by Millet »

Walt

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Re: "Rooting cuttings -- Can we reduce the process to its essence?"
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2018, 05:36:03 PM »
I've rooted figs and tried to root citrus cuttings.
Figs are easy.  I've never lost a cutting from the edible fig.  Most other species I've tried, I've lost one here and there.  Some species of figs for roots in the air, on the tree.  Banyans are figs though not the edible kinds.
Citrus I have tried twice with no success.  I think Millet's suggestion of sterilizing the cuttings might have made a difference.

SoCal2warm

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Re: "Rooting cuttings -- Can we reduce the process to its essence?"
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2018, 06:54:17 PM »
Probably the most essential is maintaining humidity and making sure it doesn't get too hot and keeping it out of direct sunlight. Many have success wrapping it with a plastic bag to hold the humidity. There also needs to constantly be a little bit of moisture and it can't dry out. Some citrus species are more vigorous and probably have a better chance of rooting. Oranges would probably be the least vigorous.

Millet

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Re: "Rooting cuttings -- Can we reduce the process to its essence?"
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2018, 09:14:36 PM »
A citrus cutting has the highest stored energy prior to the onset of flushing and flowering.  After the flush most all of the energy was  depleted creating the flush.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2018, 09:17:31 PM by Millet »

barath

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Re: "Rooting cuttings -- Can we reduce the process to its essence?"
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2018, 11:30:18 PM »
I've rooted lemon cuttings by just sticking them in sterile potting medium (coco coir or peat moss) in a 1 gallon pot and putting a clear plastic bag over and placing in a spot that gets mostly (but not complete) shade.  In a few months the cuttings start growing, which is a signal they rooted.

Wisner

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Re: "Rooting cuttings -- Can we reduce the process to its essence?"
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2018, 08:20:29 PM »
I rooted Meyer lemon cuttings by putting 4 inch pieces straight into potting soil outside with about an inch sticking out.  It took several months, went through the winter, and in the spring they all started putting out leaves and growing.  They all grew to be good trees.

Millet

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Re: "Rooting cuttings -- Can we reduce the process to its essence?"
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2018, 09:32:25 PM »
Meyer lemon is among the easiest  citrus cultivar to root.

 

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