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Author Topic: Galangal  (Read 924 times)

LivingParadise

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Galangal
« on: March 31, 2017, 03:35:13 PM »
So I planted galangal, which is a plant similar to ginger but with a different flavor, that is popular in Thai food. And I must say, it is happier in drought, and healthier so far than my forays into various gingers, particularly as this is the dry season.

So if you have terrible soil, and marked drought periods, this might be a sturdy one to try. Unfortunately, I am not as fond of the taste as I am of the other similar plants. But it's healthy, and thus far I don't mess with anything under the soil, I only harvest leaves occasionally as a spice, like for soups that employ the coconuts from my yard. I have high hopes this one will last a long time here.

Chandramohan

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2017, 03:42:02 PM »
Slices of the rhizome gives a nice flavour to clear soups and the slices can be eaten.

Gambit

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2017, 08:38:15 PM »
Google for "Tom Kha Gai" recipes. The ginger ingredient for this Thai soup actually galangal. This link has a pretty authentic Tom Kha Gai
http://rasamalaysia.com/tom-kha-gai-recipe-thai-coconut-chicken-soup/2/

murahilin

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2017, 09:43:49 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galangal

Wikipedia says there are 4 different species that are referred to as galangal. Which one are you referring to?

Gambit

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2017, 10:01:45 PM »
Most likely A. galanga, wasn't aware of the other spp. Positive that this is the one in oriental markets.

DimplesLee

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2017, 10:17:49 PM »
In the Phils langkawas means lesser galangal - A officinarum. In the local pinoy supermarkets greater galangal is tagged as Thai galangal or Thai ginger and the lesser galangal plain langkawas or "local galangal". So Thai recipes probably means A galanga.  :)
Diggin in dirt and shifting compost - gardeners crossfit regime :)

LivingParadise

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2017, 12:24:59 AM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galangal

Wikipedia says there are 4 different species that are referred to as galangal. Which one are you referring to?

I don't know - the plant I bought was only labeled as "galangal." I've never heard of any other kind. This tastes the same as the spice I bought, which is also simply labeled "galangal." I'm guessing whichever one is most commonly used Thai galangal, and known that way in the US. It has rather pointed narrow leaves, compared to the gingers I've grown. Kind of like bamboo leaves.

Chandramohan

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2017, 02:15:54 PM »
A. galanga is a plant which looks like Cardamomum plant, with smaller, pointed leaves. It flowers and fruits at the tip of leaf bracts. The fruits look like cardamom,but tastes very strong. Lesser galangal is Kaempfera.galanga, which is a small plant that can be grown in pots and looks like a big 'lotus flower'.

LivingParadise

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2017, 09:55:10 PM »
Thank you, Chandramohan, for that explanation. My plant looks nothing like Kaempferia galanga. But its leaves are narrower than photos I am finding online of Alipinia galanga - although it is definitely a lot closer to that one. I wonder if there are other varieties/species close to A. galanga, but with narrow pointy leaves like mine? Or if this is just a natural variance, maybe compounded by the fact that my plant is still young.

Chandramohan

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2017, 10:26:33 AM »
If yr plant is young, then the leaves are narrower. Did you buy from a dependable source? Because there are other Alpinias which look similar.

LivingParadise

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2017, 10:34:44 AM »
Thanks - it would make sense then because it is still young. Semi dependable source. I don't know that there is such a thing as an extremely reliable source in the US when it comes to anything labeled "galangal," which is not common at all to find in the US. Any commercial nursery here in the contiguous 48 states will tend to make mistakes when identifying any tropical plants, since the US (outside of Hawaii, very far SFL, and territories) is not tropical. So I wouldn't be shocked if it was a related species, but as long as it has the flavor it so far seems to have, that's fine with me. So far, in tasting it in small quantities, it did not poison me - and that's the thing that matters to me. I have another Alpinia species which is not edible, and at least this clearly looks very different from that one.

Mike T

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2017, 08:51:33 AM »
There is only one galangal Alpinia galanga. Kencur, krachai (I grow all 3 of these) and a number of other much smaller species mistakenly called galangal are not the real thing.This species gets big and needs to be controlled.It is common here and easy to identify and more importantly an essential ingredient in thai cooking as is krachai.

junglevulture

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #12 on: June 14, 2017, 11:08:11 PM »
I too find myself using the leaves of my Galangal (Alpinia galanga) to flavor soups, etc because I'm impatiently waiting for my first harvest. The flavor imparted by the leaves is so much more subdued though, and I love the intensity that the rhizome offers. Its surprising how difficult it was to acquire where I am, so I've (quite impatiently) dedicated all I have found during the past year to cultivation.

My favorite thing to use the root as a spice for is Chicken Foot Stock. It has the perfect earthy depth to add to the savory-ness of the gelatin. Only other thing I put is sea salt, and its so good just like that.

lebmung

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #13 on: August 17, 2017, 04:42:02 PM »
Galangal likes shade, and 3 months of dry season, that is the time when all the nutrients go into the rhizome.
By the way they can be started by seeds also, seeds are rare because no one collects them in their habitat.

Chandramohan

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #14 on: August 17, 2017, 11:04:29 PM »
I will have seeds in a months time.

A.T. Hagan

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #15 on: October 19, 2017, 08:59:21 PM »
This is an interesting thread. I just this month acquired some Galangal (A. Galangal) of which I'm pretty certain of the i.d. The month before I also picked up some turmeric and green cardamom plants.

Any tips for keeping them all happy?


Mugenia

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #16 on: October 20, 2017, 03:00:10 AM »
Galangal is easy. Just stick it into the ground and give it some mulch and plenty of water. I love galangal.

lebmung

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #17 on: October 26, 2017, 07:36:01 AM »
Keep water away during winter. They root rot easily.

A.T. Hagan

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Re: Galangal
« Reply #18 on: October 26, 2017, 12:35:04 PM »
Yes, many have said that.  I'm going with a somewhat raised bed for these so that shouldn't be a problem.


 

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