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Author Topic: Guava dieback  (Read 498 times)

recifecbba

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Guava dieback
« on: November 07, 2017, 01:43:43 PM »
Guava problems...
several different varieties grew and fruited great initially, then almost seems like it burnt up. Definitely not drought or water problems as I make sure to water them during dry spells. I doubt its fertilizer burn because I was only fertilizing with a handfull of excalibur  839 every few months (way below recommendations true, but I was experimenting). Could deficiency cause such severe dieback and death? I thought guavas were naturalized here in florida, I figured they could take some neglect. (other possible causes of the dieback I was thinking was perhaps herbicide in the canal water used for irrigation? ) They 3 spots in question were these trees are/were are also other fruit trees which haven't experienced this problem (coconut,avocado,banana,citrus....)








mangaba

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2017, 07:10:55 PM »
Some of my guava trees this year showed changes in their leaves. Could some member help me to identify if it is a deficiency or a disease?





shot

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2017, 07:53:25 PM »
nematodes= roundworms   

recifecbba

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2017, 10:01:45 PM »
are guava especially vulnerable to nematodes (as compared to other fruit trees)?

Guanabanus

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2017, 10:31:10 PM »
Yes.

Add lots of compost, which suppresses nematode reproduction.
Har

greenman62

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2017, 12:36:40 PM »
Some of my guava trees this year showed changes in their leaves. Could some member help me to identify if it is a deficiency or a disease?





that looks more like deficiency to me.
what kind of soil is it in ?
container or ground ?
check the soil with your finger an inch deep...
sometimes when its hot, i will just water the top to make sure they dont try out
and wait for rain to deep water them.
often the soil can get hard and hydrophobic (repel water)

Guava are not very drought tolerant, especially in containers.
and they like a lot of organic matter in the soil
if its sandy soil, use a LOT of mulch and compost tea
or worm castings. + fish emulsion helps a bit as well.

i just repotted 4 guava, and all of them were dry and sandy
and the organic matter had been eaten up or washed out.

mangaba

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2017, 03:27:54 PM »
The soil is sandy but I add a lot of mulch. I first thought it might be dry soil but this year we have had rain almost daily for the last 5 months and the posted photos were taken yesterday I fertilizes every 4 mos with 20-10-20.

Orkine

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2017, 09:55:30 AM »
I have a guava that is dying back as well.
Photos below.
I hope there is something I can do to save it.
If it dies, it will be the third at this location and I am thinking the last I will plant.

Everything around this plant is lush but the plant is dieing back.









Guanabanus

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2017, 11:28:32 AM »
If the 20% Potassium fertilizer, mentioned above, is fast release, it is all gone after 6 inches of rain.

Both the posters' pictures probably show deficiencies of Potassium and some other elements, probably including Magnesium deficiency.  This can be from lack of these in the soil, or because of inability of the plant to absorb them, due to root problems, such as nematode attack.
Har

Orkine

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2017, 11:49:54 AM »
If the 20% Potassium fertilizer, mentioned above, is fast release, it is all gone after 6 inches of rain.

Both the posters' pictures probably show deficiencies of Potassium and some other elements, probably including Magnesium deficiency.  This can be from lack of these in the soil, or because of inability of the plant to absorb them, due to root problems, such as nematode attack.

Thanks Har, how do I verify the cause and how do I try to correct this deficiency.
Will heavy mulching help, is there any in place organic solution or am I looking at a chemical application.  I am not adverse to using chemicals just not the first choice.


Guanabanus

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2017, 01:32:42 PM »
Soil drenches and foliar sprays of seaweed would probably help.

Potassium sulfate is allowed in organic production to address a proven need.  Certifiers prefer a soil test or a tissue test.

And Potassium Chloride / "muriate of potash" is a natural, mined substance.  It works O.K. when appled frequently in very small amounts.  Too much, and it produces the famous "fertilizer burn" from excess Chloride.
Har

greenman62

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2017, 01:51:14 PM »
The soil is sandy but I add a lot of mulch. I first thought it might be dry soil but this year we have had rain almost daily for the last 5 months and the posted photos were taken yesterday I fertilizes every 4 mos with 20-10-20.

mine had a lot of rain over the summer also
but, i have very rich soil.
i would try worm castings scratched into the soil an inch or so
and very heavy mulch.
i use a layer of compost, then cardboard, then woody mulch on top.
it transforms sand into good soil and keeps moisture consistent.
it also provides great environment for worms, which can help add good microbes to the soil.

ive not had a guava with nematode issues
ive also never seen one with over-watering or root-rot issues.
(New Orleans is one of the highest rainfall cities)
and i have a 6 guava in ground and maybe a dozen smaller ones in containers.
they do seem to dry out the soil around them quickly, especially sandy soil.

Orkine

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #12 on: November 12, 2017, 02:29:12 PM »
Thanks I will try the seaweed drench.
I will also get some mulch.

Lory

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2017, 09:14:22 PM »
nematodes= roundworms   


Yes I'm 99% sire the culprit are  NEMATODES!
I had the same problem.
It looks like mineral deficiency, you keep on fertilizing but nothis is "good enough"  to let your  tree recover.
Because roots just can't absorb the nutrients properly.
No more feeding rootlets left.
it happened  the same to my once very  beautiful red guava tree.
In 4 months a beautiful tree was devastated. Leaf discoloring, chlorosis, deificiency signs.....no fertilizer helped.
I eventually uprooted the tree and the root system was completely devastated, swollen, corroded and rotten.
Because after nematodes feed on the root system, they are easily attacked by fungal infection and rot.
I chopped the entire tree with its roots and i burned it.
So sad.  :(
It seems guava is very sensitive to this problem and there is little if anything you can do once your tree is infected....
Lorenzo

Orkine

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #14 on: November 13, 2017, 08:10:27 AM »
Lorenzo, that is not good news.
I will try the drench and hope for the best.  If it still dies, I will dig it up and look at the roots.

Guanabanus

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #15 on: November 13, 2017, 10:39:55 AM »
You can also drench with an Azadirachtin-containing product such as Aza-Sol or Molt-X.   Azadirachtin is the true extract from Neem seed.  Do not substitute with Neem seed oil, even if the word "extract" is included in the oil product's name.
Har

shot

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #16 on: November 13, 2017, 01:35:13 PM »
Neemix 4.5 Insect Growth Regulator, Certis MeloCon WG Biological Nematicide all good along with Chitin Nematicide= shrimp shells 'crab shell powder,Steinernema feltiae=predatory nematodes.Just good soil biota ,mulch meal based fertilizer ,trap crops chop and drop.

Conventional pesticide for nematodes control is mostly pre plant fumigantes or the old hammer approach organophosphates is no long term solution = futile

Secondary pathogens from feeding nematodes is large problem in plants not just guava.Some nematodes species create undifferentiated cells bury themselves almost entirely thus out of reach of harm ,all the while laying eggs.
But all is not lost their is ways, root stock with known resistance, example I planted a dozen or so of red indian and ruby supreme guava about 25 years ago two are left, one grow okay and the other very vigorous so= root stock!

Happy farming cheers

Lory

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #17 on: November 14, 2017, 04:47:44 AM »
Thanks for the useful information it gives us hope!
Lorenzo

Orkine

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #18 on: November 23, 2017, 10:18:49 AM »
Happy Thanksgiving to you all - US based.

Har, how frequently can I apply the seaweed drench?
I went with the muriate of potash.  How frequently can that be applied?

Guanabanus

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #19 on: November 23, 2017, 11:05:16 PM »
During rainy weather, monthly.
Har

Orkine

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Re: Guava dieback
« Reply #20 on: Today at 10:16:43 AM »
Glad I asked, I was going to do it weekly or every other week until the guava starts to come back. :)

 

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