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Author Topic: Brussels Sprouts  (Read 317 times)

HMHausman

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Brussels Sprouts
« on: April 04, 2012, 03:34:11 PM »
OK...so I love Brussels Sprouts.  I eat them roasted in olive oil and various seasonings many times per week in my meals.  So I planted some out in my garden for the second season in a row. Last year, they grew beautifully but I planted too late and they matured when it was too warm and wet and they got a nasty fungus and were eaten up by some unknown bug.  So, I planted earlier this year.  Large, gorgeous plants grew.  The little sprouts were just coming up to size.  I went out this past weekend to harvest them.  To my disgust, there was a complete covering of each every sprout with a thick herd of fat aphids.  I mean by the thousands and no sprout was left unattended by these little suckers.  I was so upset I just gave up and went back inside muttering under my breath.  I did not do any spraying and prefer not to do any. Has anyone any consoling words of advice or encouragement? I hate to have another competely wasted cop....but I am not interested in creating a toxic waste dump in my garden.

Harry
Harry
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murahilin

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Re: Brussels Sprouts
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2012, 04:36:04 PM »
Here is a full episode on growing cauliflower and brussels sprouts  from the best tv gardening series ever, Fresh from the Garden:
http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/video/player/0,1000643,DIY_33170_7664_36846-35001,00.html


fruitlovers

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Re: Brussels Sprouts
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2012, 05:15:07 PM »
OK...so I love Brussels Sprouts.  I eat them roasted in olive oil and various seasonings many times per week in my meals.  So I planted some out in my garden for the second season in a row. Last year, they grew beautifully but I planted too late and they matured when it was too warm and wet and they got a nasty fungus and were eaten up by some unknown bug.  So, I planted earlier this year.  Large, gorgeous plants grew.  The little sprouts were just coming up to size.  I went out this past weekend to harvest them.  To my disgust, there was a complete covering of each every sprout with a thick herd of fat aphids.  I mean by the thousands and no sprout was left unattended by these little suckers.  I was so upset I just gave up and went back inside muttering under my breath.  I did not do any spraying and prefer not to do any. Has anyone any consoling words of advice or encouragement? I hate to have another competely wasted cop....but I am not interested in creating a toxic waste dump in my garden.

Harry

Used to grow brussel sprouts to sell to stores. It was also the logo for my business at that time as i had one plant that got a whopping 9 feet tall. Aphids are quite common on brussel sprouts, but also quite easy to control with soapy water spray. Main nemesis for me was the cabbage butterfly that lays it's eggs on that whole cabbage family and leaves end up looking like shot gun blasted. Again easy to remedy using regular BT spray (Bacillus thuringensis). You can even combine soapy water and BT into same spray. Cabbage family crops are difficult to grow in tropical climates. They only really do well if you time them to mature during winter.
Oscar

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Re: Brussels Sprouts
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2012, 05:36:49 PM »
Which variety were you growing Harry? Sounds like you need to sort through different varieties and find ones adapted to your climate and pest situation.

I found this website that is very informative on growing Brussel Sprouts;
http://www.onthegreenfarms.com/fruit-vegetable/how-to-grow-organic-brussels-sprouts/

Also you can get an idea of some varieties that may work in your area;
http://www.vegetable-gardening-made-simple.com/brussel-sprout-varieties.html
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

Ethan

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Re: Brussels Sprouts
« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2012, 06:23:20 PM »
Dont give up Harry, brussel sprouts are worth it!  I've 2-3 different moth/butterflies including gulf frittelies that wreak havoc on certain plants in the garden.  I'm going to buy my daughter a butterfly net and let her catch all she wants. :)

I have a pineapple that was just starting to turn yellow then a day or so later ants found it.......little *$#@ers.

good luck,
-Ethan

zands

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Re: Brussels Sprouts
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2012, 10:49:29 AM »
OK...so I love Brussels Sprouts.  I eat them roasted in olive oil and various seasonings many times per week in my meals.  So I planted some out in my garden for the second season in a row. Last year, they grew beautifully but I planted too late and they matured when it was too warm and wet and they got a nasty fungus and were eaten up by some unknown bug.  So, I planted earlier this year.  Large, gorgeous plants grew.  The little sprouts were just coming up to size.  I went out this past weekend to harvest them.  To my disgust, there was a complete covering of each every sprout with a thick herd of fat aphids.  I mean by the thousands and no sprout was left unattended by these little suckers.  I was so upset I just gave up and went back inside muttering under my breath.  I did not do any spraying and prefer not to do any. Has anyone any consoling words of advice or encouragement? I hate to have another competely wasted cop....but I am not interested in creating a toxic waste dump in my garden.

Harry

I would get the little plants you have started into the ground three months before an expected late December-early February harvest. I really like them too. The ones in the supermarket are expensive and tasteless and usually come all the way from California when they could be grown in Georgia which is where we get lots of our cool season greens. You can get that same caramelized/roasted effect with kale too. Just put it in a hot oiled pan then cover with heat down low and you'll get lots of browned caramelization...the same reason people like pizza with a little bit of overcooked charred and brown spots on the crust and dittos for bread being toasted
« Last Edit: April 05, 2012, 12:02:43 PM by zands »

 

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