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Messages - simon_grow

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango grafting question - See pic
« on: March 24, 2019, 08:10:35 AM »
I would do a veneer graft.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0jqlX6hqPno&t=292s

Simon

2
It could be nutritional or due to the size(establishment) of your trees. Your Coconut Cream looks like it could use some fertilizer based on the light green color of your leaves.

Your other trees may have a more established root system and canopy so it may have more energy to push out larger blooms.

Simon

I have been feeding 20-20-20 with micros through Ez-Flo during regular watering which is a few times a week, and fish emulsion + kelp every two weeks. Can it be in a nutrient lock condition for any reason?

Those ratios are too high for Mangos grown in SoCal, especially when combined with fish emulsion. Unless you are using the 20-20-20 in diluted feedings, you can be causing nutrient lock but it depends on many factors.

Going into the fall and especially in Winter, Mangos donít need much if any fertilizer since they basically stop growing vegetatively when itís cold.

Too much Nitrogen in Fall and Winter will encourage wayward( out of season) growth that may start out vegetatively but will end up usually turning into blooms. This out of season growth is exposed to cold weather and the growth often gets injured by the cold or fungus.

Your fertilizer regimen may work well in the warmer months between May through August but I would decrease Nitrogen and increase Silica, Iron, Magnesium, Manganese and Zinc around September. Increasing these micros and some of the minors around this time will help your tree uptake these elements before it gets too cold. When it gets too cold, it becomes more difficult for mango trees to uptake these nutrients partly because of slower respiration and partly because of decreased microbial activity in the soil.

Simon

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Myrica rubra
« on: March 22, 2019, 10:19:44 AM »
Hereís the video Fang:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pCo1TIXo-tE

Simon

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Cutting el Bumpo
« on: March 22, 2019, 10:10:52 AM »
That sucks!

Simon

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Jaboticabaholics Anonymous
« on: March 21, 2019, 06:26:34 PM »
Definitely at least partially due to lack of Iron because I can see the veins are still a bit green with yellow in between the veins and it appears both young and older leaves are affected. You may need a bit of Magnesium as well. I would try a foliar with something like Southern Ag Citrus nutritional spray which you can pick up at Home Depot.

Your pot may be slightly too large for the plant so you are washing away a lot of the nutrients from the soil. It's better to gradually step up the pot but it's probably best to leave it in its current container because it's probably already somewhat filled the pot.

Simon

Figured I'd post a follow up. Almost 2 years later and the little jabo is looking much better. The Southern Ag Citrus treatment really work well. Greened up nice and growing slowly but surely. Thanks for the advice!



Iím glad the tree greened up for you! You may also want to consider putting some soil Sulfur to bring down the pH of the soil/water. Jaboticabas also love Iron.

Simon

6
It could be nutritional or due to the size(establishment) of your trees. Your Coconut Cream looks like it could use some fertilizer based on the light green color of your leaves.

Your other trees may have a more established root system and canopy so it may have more energy to push out larger blooms.

Simon

7
A couple of my Pim Seng Mun seedlings have this happening to some of their leaf stems. It's not superficial like sooty mold, but is in the tissue. What is it and what can I do about it? Thanks!




I believe that is a fungus. I have seen that in a lot of trees in SoCal, looks like you guys have it in Florida too. Sometimes you can see a hole where the darkening begins. It usually starts on that little stem where the leaf begins, just like the picture you posted.

In our colder climate, the darkening progressively moves down the central vein of that leaf and the leaf eventually dries up, sometimes staying attached to the branch after itís dead. Sometimes, dieback of the stem occurs around areas that show these symptoms.

I would spray with Copper fungicide recommended for mango and alternating it with Sulfur per manufacturers instructions. If you use a systemic copper like Magnabon CS2005, it will work better than some of the cheaper coppers.

Simon

8
Unfortunately, my 3 gallon coconut cream from plantogram appeared to develop floral malformation. It was planted September 2018, and has grown a few feet since then. It started to form multiple flower panicles lately, and most of them look like below. What is the best remedy? Cut all the flowers if it has a chance in the future without the use of fungicides? Or, should I cut my losses and remove it so the disease doesn't spread to healthy trees. Thanks in advance.








That is not Mango Malformation disease. That is a pretty typical flowering panicle in Winter for SoCal grown Mangos. You can just leave the blooms or cut off 1/2-2/3 just to take some weight off the branch.

Simon

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Myrica rubra
« on: March 20, 2019, 08:19:56 AM »
Hey Fang, Iíll be happy to swap scions with you if I get a male tree.

Hopefully the nursery in the video will start selling grafted plants in the coming years.

Simon

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Myrica rubra
« on: March 19, 2019, 07:19:30 PM »
I got seeds from a friend. I cold stratified in fridge for a month and then planted the seeds in a pot outdoors and just ignored it.

A different batch of seeds that were treated with GA and placed on a heat Matt did not sprout. I cracked open a few seeds and it was mushy inside.

For this pot, I planted 4 seeds and only one came up so far.

Simon

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit stuff in San Diego?
« on: March 19, 2019, 07:10:41 PM »
Exotica nursery in Vista has a fruit tasting table with whatever is in season.

You may also want to check out Ongs nursery in Linda Vista and California Tropical Fruit Nursery.

Simon

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Myrica rubra
« on: March 18, 2019, 08:03:17 PM »
I just got home and dug down a little and confirmed I got my first seed to sprout. Some weeds were growing in this pot so I wasnít positive yesterday if it was really Yangmei but I followed the plant down to the cotyledon and I found the hard shell.

Thereís still a chance it could die as others have experienced but Iím hoping for the best. Iím just hoping more will sprout so that I might get lucky with a male and female. Then I just have to hope I get lucky with decent tasting fruit if everything else goes well.


Simon

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Myrica rubra
« on: March 18, 2019, 12:22:24 AM »
Anyone have luck germinating seeds?

Simon

14
See this article that another forum member previously shared.

http://era.daf.qld.gov.au/id/eprint/1653/5/4keycus.pdf

It depends on your soil, climate, scion and rootstocks but in general, Atemoya grafted onto sugar Apple will be slower growing. Atemoya grafted onto Atemoya seedling may be slightly more cold tolerant and slower growing than grafted onto Cherimoya rootstocks.

Cherimoya rootstock will generally give you faster, more vigorous growth.

See page 51-52 on the link provided above for an Annona compatibly table.

I am no annon expert, perhaps Har or Frank can chime in.

Simon

15
I personally try to avoid pruning before the rains. I used to be a microbiologist and spores activate in moisture so it is best to avoid pruning until after the rains. If there is very low disease pressures around your orchard, you may get away with it but itís not worth the risk to me.

Simon

16
The trees youíre trying to grow in pots are all huge trees when fully grown. They are not recommended for pot culture but that doesnít mean it canít be done, itís just not ideal.

You will have to treat the trees almost like Bonsai trees. The trees should initially grow fine as long as youíre giving them good soil, water and fertilizer but eventually the pot will fill with roots and the root health will deteriorate due to root circling and fibrous feeder roots choking itself out.

At that point, you will have to trim the roots and the canopy. Doing this is a difficult task but it will renew the vigor and production of the tree. Potted trees need root pruning. Not root pruning trees that have been in pots for extended periods of time is one of the biggest mistakes that gardeners make.

Simon

17
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Looking for Gigantea Sapodilla tree
« on: March 15, 2019, 09:28:41 PM »
Iím looking for a Gigantea Sapodilla tree. If you have one for sale and can ship, please contact me. Thanks,

Simon

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Jabo pruning advice
« on: March 15, 2019, 04:59:42 PM »
If itís pushing new leaves, thatís a great sign. My Sabara is evergreen but thatís just my yard. You got a nice sized Sabara, hopefully it will fruit for you soon.

Simon

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Jabo pruning advice
« on: March 15, 2019, 11:45:27 AM »
Did you just transplant that tree? Iíve never seen a Jaboticaba thatís dropped all itís leaves like that. Is there any sign of life on it like leaf buds?

If you recently transplanted it and damaged a lot of the roots, you can prune/head back a lot of the taller growth. When I transplant trees, I like to prune back the vegetative growth so that the mass of the above ground growth is similar to or less than the mass of the roots. This is to ensure the tree is balanced in terms of water balance and so that the tree doesnít die.

Simon

20
You can see pictures of my Big Jim fruits that are larger than chicken eggs in this thread.
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=6538.0

Big Jim is the best tasting of the giant Loquats that I have personally tasted. They can pretty easily get to around 3 Oz with thinning. The early Big Jimís can be bland, especially in rainy years but the late Big Jimís are fantastic with excellent sugar content and just enough acidity to make the fruit interesting.

Leo Manuelís Seedling Loquat from seeds via Maurice Kong also grow to huge proportions. Leoís seedling fruit gets to chicken egg size without thinning but the fruit in the pictures were the first year the tree fruited and it only had a few clusters of fruit so in essence it was sorta self thinned although Leo did not cut any blooms off.

It is unfair to judge the fruit quality based off of fruit from a young tree but the fruit was bland from my recollection. Leo does not consistently fertilize to size up fruit or to improve Brix so there may be a lot of room for improvement. Here is s thread with some pictures of Leoís seedling Loquat.
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=23667.msg344391#msg344391

Simon

22
Hey everyone, just to clarify things a bit, I used the nutrient yeast which is dead. You can purchase these nutritional yeast supplements online or at health food stores but I wouldnít buy the expensive stuff. Basically itís just dead yeast which has lots of different B vitamins along with Sulfur, Magnesium, Zinc, Iron and other minerals.

If you cant find it, you can just take bakers yeast and cook it.

Hereís a link to a random yeast supplement I found online but it gives you an idea of whatís found in the yeast that may have plant growth promoting properties.

I have not tried using live/activated bakers yeast but it may work.

Simon

23
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Grafting with micropore
« on: March 10, 2019, 05:22:42 PM »
I havenít used micropore, sounds similar to buddy tape.

If you get mold/fungus on your scions, try spraying with a fungicide and let the scion dry before wrapping. You can also treat the scion while it is still on the mother tree and let the fungicide completely dry before removing and wrapping the scions.

Buddy tape is breathable but I still get moisture trapped beneath the tape but I donít get fungus because of my pre treatment.

Simon

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Bubble gum flavored Cherimoya?
« on: March 10, 2019, 01:46:04 PM »
Over multiple years, Iíve reported that El Bumpo has a bubblegum flavor. Several other people have also noticed the bubblegum flavor in El Bumpo after I mentioned it.

Simon

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Jabo 2019
« on: March 08, 2019, 05:05:32 PM »
Awesome harvest! I canít wait for my trees to start producing in large numbers. I make a lot of wine with my excess fruit.

Simon

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