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Messages - HIfarm

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Peaches growing in Hawaii?
« on: April 18, 2018, 04:12:13 PM »
Hopefully Oscar will chime in.  I recall he had some type of peach, I think 'Red Ceylon', that was pretty good quality (but small) & would bear reliably here.  I have not seen it or its seed offered anywhere.  I will be interested to see if anyone is reporting success with any other cultivars.

I don't know that the "chill hours" thing is a reliable indicator.  There is a blackberry (Natchez, if I recall correctly) that is supposed to require about 300 hrs and people are fruiting it reliably here close to sea level -- where there are zero hours of chill time according to the definition.  That's no guarantee that something will fruit that is supposed to require more but it might be worth a try.  It also makes me wonder how long lived a plant will be if it doesn't get that dormancy it is looking for ...

John

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Achacha seeds source in US/Hawaii?
« on: April 17, 2018, 01:53:11 PM »
My trees are still small but mine were sourced from a couple of our friends "downunder" from fruit commercially available there.  Not sure if their source was significantly different from those already here in HI.  We'll see when they eventually start to bear.

Getting some more diversity as you suggest Lance is probably not a bad idea.  I think a lot of fruits get branded as "good" or "bad" based upon one particular strain that happened to be imported by someone.

John

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Kandi fruit tree?
« on: April 13, 2018, 06:00:54 PM »
"kandis" is a name I have heard applied to more than one Garcinia species from the Malaysia/Indonesia region.  If you do a search for garcinia  kandis, you may be able to figure out what you have, or at least narrow it down.  Unfortunately, most of these Asian Garcinias are dioecious.

John

4
Jim West has the Pourouma and a relative of the Bellucia.  For a while, he was not taking new customers but I think I had heard he is again.

http://www.guaycuyacu.net/seed_sell.html

John

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: ID help: eggplant shaped avocado?
« on: April 10, 2018, 08:16:44 PM »
That's an interesting looking avo.  We've got a few here that look somewhat similar but none that seems an exact match.  I have attached a link for Ken Love's "Big Island Avocados" -- http://bigislandnow.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/AvocadoPoster.jpg

John

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Thaumatococcus Daniellii
« on: April 02, 2018, 09:43:14 PM »
If you do a search, there are earlier threads about this plant.  Here is one here:
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=15366.0

ForestHouse in Cameroon has had these seeds in season.  Germination can be slow on these.

John

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What you see when fruit sleuthing
« on: March 30, 2018, 02:04:40 PM »
Did you try that Annona paludosa fruit?  I grew one tree from seed.  It fruited & died back -- not sure if it is coming back or dead yet.  The fruit on mine seemed to be nearly all seeds with no noticeable pulp.  Other than the fact it was quite small & might be of value for a dwarfing rootstock, I saw no redeeming features to it -- unless it was some fluke fruiting & is normally of better quality.

John

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sex and the Salaks . . .
« on: March 26, 2018, 10:49:13 PM »
Division of suckers is common place in Bali & Java.  I have no idea of what kind of hit rate they get on them but markets will sell you rooted suckers that will come true to type.

Peter's tip sounds like the way to go.  Perhaps the hit rate might improve a bit if you sprinkle a little rooting hormone on the cut you make on the "rhizome".

John

9
That's Thaumatococcus daniellii.  I believe it is a relatives of the gingers -- but the seeds are very much unlike any gingers I have seen....

ForestHouse in Cameroon used to carry the seeds for it (in season).

John

10
Temperate Fruit & Orchard Online Library / Cyclopedia of Hardy Fruits
« on: March 17, 2018, 03:24:04 PM »
I came across this pdf.  Seems like a good reference for some older clones that are now sometimes pretty obscure:

https://ia601403.us.archive.org/27/items/cyclopediaofhard00hedrrich/cyclopediaofhard00hedrrich.pdf

John

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Kesusu (Prainea limpato) Germination
« on: March 11, 2018, 02:30:46 PM »
A word of caution -- if you planting these somewhere where rats have access to them, rats love the seeds.  A couple of years ago, I planted some seeds (along with a number of other seeds) in my greenhouse.  Rats immediately dug up all the kesusu and didn't touch anything else.

John

13




Is it mangga Kweni (Mangifera odorata Griffith) ?

Nice done with durian ! Is it true that red durian (Durio oxleyanus) from montain area can survive up to 0C ?


That fruit above doesn't look like kuini I have had.  I suspect it might be M. pajang?

Pictures of D. oxleyanus are green to maybe bronzey-green.  If it is red, is it maybe D. dulcis? (or red flesh, D. graveolens?)

John

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Garcinia morella fruits.
« on: March 03, 2018, 12:51:54 AM »
Thanks for the report.  Do you know if that is typical for the species or does it vary?

John

15
Thanks for posting this, Alexandre.  If I had heard it before, I had forgotten it.  I've got a wet spot that might be a good spot to throw some more abiu in.

John

Hi,

Yes, they live inside the forest with lots of humidity, and they exist in swampy places, especially in the Amazon.




Have you seen these grow in wet/flooded areas?

16
That is a great find, thanks for posting.  Maybe the moderators will want to move it to the library section so it will be easier to find for reference in the future?

John

17
To add to Jon's list, above, there are a few Artocarpus species are not well known outside of the Philippines, A. blancoi ("antipolo"),  A. cumingiana ("anubing"), A. treculianus ("tipuho").  Info seems kind of sketchy on them but antipolo seems to be eaten as a vegetable.  References say tipuho is eaten but I am not sure if it is as a fruit or vegetalble; the leaves are evidently used to wrap food.   I did not come across any info on how anubing is used (food-wise) but I believe that the seeds of all Artocarpus are edible.  I suspect that at least one of these species is here in Hawaii as the Filipino farmers sometimes sell an immature green Artocarpus here that resembles a breadfruit.

Garcinia binucao, that Jon mentioned above, is also known as "batuan".  That was the common name I came across for it when I had been researching Philippine fruits for a potential trip.

When I was comprising a spreadsheet of Philippine fruit, I came up with something like 70+ species (including some found only on Palawan) but I do not know how common some of these are or how good the fruit is.  I also did not reach the point of finding common names for most of them.  So, there are plenty of fruit options there...

If you do a search for "Co's Digital Flora of the Philippines", you'll find a wealth of info on species that occur there & on which islands they are found.

John

18

Ok, you are both right. Salak is not found naturally in most of the Philippines but S. ramosiana is found in Palawan.  The flora of Palawan more closely resembles that of Borneo than that of the rest of the Philippines.  Reports are sketchy but it sounds like it is a species worth looking at further for its fruit.  I looked into a trip to Palawan earlier but it sounds like getting seeds out legally might be "complicated".

John
S. ramosiana is called "Paratungon". Quite sour though, like rattan
[/quote]

I guess I had forgotten the common name.  According to an article in Agribusiness (July 24, 2013), it reports some varieties of paratungon are "sweet and acidic" so it sounds like there may be some more useful varieties.

19
I've been told there is great Salak. My friend brought me some seeds and two made the journey. Most were taken from her. From what I can tell it is different than my three varieties.
Contrary to some reports indicating the abundance of salak in the Philippines, that fruit is nowhere to be found here. It's unheard of although rattan fruits which bear some resemblance to it is quite ubiquitous.

Ok, you are both right. Salak is not found naturally in most of the Philippines but S. ramosiana is found in Palawan.  The flora of Palawan more closely resembles that of Borneo than that of the rest of the Philippines.  Reports are sketchy but it sounds like it is a species worth looking at further for its fruit.  I looked into a trip to Palawan earlier but it sounds like getting seeds out legally might be "complicated".

John

20
It's really sad to see that sort of vandalism.  Not to diminish this incident, but we had some really nasty vandalism here on the big island several years back where papaya orchards were being attacked and farms suffered losses ranging from hundreds to thousands of papaya trees.  I had to drive by one of these farms down in Puna -- it was a horrible sight and was really disturbing.  There were all sorts of rumors at the time from competitors to family issues to environmental wackos (some of the papaya here is genetically modified); I'm not sure these cases were ever solved.  Hopefully, they'll get the person(s) responsible for this one.

John

21
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Looking for Gnetum species
« on: February 21, 2018, 06:51:06 PM »
ForestHouse, Cameroon generally has G. africanum and bulchozianum seeds in season.

John

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Good keledang and safu
« on: February 21, 2018, 12:25:45 AM »
Hey Mike, give us a taste review after you try that safou.  I'd be interested in your thoughts on it.  Info seems to be sketchy on a lot of those African fruits.

John

23
Congratulations!  Thanks for posting about it.  I hoped to try it when in Bali but missed the season.  Glad to see your report.

John

24
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: wanted : Mammea americana
« on: February 08, 2018, 03:57:26 PM »
Oscar (Fruitlovers) generally has these in season.  Montoso (in Puerto Rico) has also had them in the past but I am not sure if these trees were severely damaged in the hurricane so would be best to check with them.

25
Pondoh is from central Java (not the amboinensis form) so should be dioecious.  Basically, anything other than the amboinensis form of S. zalacca is supposed to be dioecious.

John

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