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Author Topic: Growing Mango trees in Southern California  (Read 21854 times)

CGP3

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #175 on: April 15, 2018, 08:14:17 PM »
I picked up a glenn and Haden last week that came from la Verne. Iíll let you know how they turn out.

Rob P

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #176 on: May 15, 2018, 09:17:56 AM »
Just a thought about selecting mango varieties for So.cal. One way to make it easier for the average gardener that does not require grafting skills, would be to select vigorous polyembryonic  varieties that are suited to your soils. To this day over half of the Australian commercial production of mangoes is based on the polyembryonic variety "Kensington Pride" which are produced from seedling trees! . This variety has the drawback of being very vigorous and orchards in tropical Australia use mechanised pruners to keep them manageable, but this would not be an issue in your climate. In fact a variety with lots of vigor would would be perfect for your cooler climate.

BestDay

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #177 on: May 15, 2018, 10:16:09 AM »
I have actually been giving this same idea a lot of thought recently. My mangoes have been in the ground for about two years. The varieties described as vigorous upright growers definately look better. They are less droopy and more filled in. My Edward and Ice Cream are flat out ugly. Lemon Zest and Sweet Tart look great.

Bill

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #178 on: May 15, 2018, 06:47:32 PM »
Just a thought about selecting mango varieties for So.cal. One way to make it easier for the average gardener that does not require grafting skills, would be to select vigorous polyembryonic  varieties that are suited to your soils. To this day over half of the Australian commercial production of mangoes is based on the polyembryonic variety "Kensington Pride" which are produced from seedling trees! . This variety has the drawback of being very vigorous and orchards in tropical Australia use mechanised pruners to keep them manageable, but this would not be an issue in your climate. In fact a variety with lots of vigor would would be perfect for your cooler climate.

Yes I absolutely agree, planting seeds from polyembryonic varieties is the best way to get a big tree that is less droopy and less likely to flower in its first several years which gives it time to establish and send out roots and shoots.

Simon

Dylan SB

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #179 on: May 16, 2018, 02:28:46 AM »
How long will it take for monembrianic mangoes to bloom in California from seed?  I have a seed that I planted that has somehow survived the last three winters.  It is maybe 3 feet tall at best.  I had previously gotten a Manilla tree to produce but had removed it after several years of not producing any fruit to what I now know as powdery mildew.

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #180 on: May 16, 2018, 08:24:45 AM »
Monoembryonic and polyembryonic Mango seedlings can start blooming at a very early age due to cold stimulus. I had a Kent seedling bloom at about three years old although I believe 4-6 years is more common. The size and health of the tree can also affect when it blooms. Trees that are stressed may bloom earlier.

Simon

Dylan SB

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #181 on: May 20, 2018, 09:23:37 PM »
Simon_Grow,

Thanks for the information.  Here is my small tree that has survived the last three winters.  It gets some protection from the Avocado that I grew from seed behind it. 





Rob P

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #182 on: May 20, 2018, 11:41:58 PM »
Kensington Pride is a vigorous polyembrionic variety that could be tried, is has a very nice distinctive flavor, it does have a small amount of fiber. This variety is used a lot in breeding here in Australia to incorporate some of its flavor to the progeny as it is so familiar to the locals. R2E2 is a very popular variety which is a cross of KP and Kent for memory, it is a very large fruit with little fiber. Being a cross of a monoembrionic and a polyembrionic parent about half of the fruit contain a polyembionic seed, so these seed, can also be tried. Banana-1 is another Australian polyembionic selection that could be tried as well as one called Strawberry, I am happy send seed of all these if required as long as you arrange your own import permits. There are two more polyembrionic varieties that could be tried that are available in the US, one is Nam Doc Mai and the other is Early Gold, this last one is said to have moderate/high anthracnose tolerance.

 

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