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Author Topic: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest  (Read 144 times)

SoCal2warm

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a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« on: July 09, 2018, 07:55:17 PM »


Bloomsweet grapefruit


Duncan citrumelo


Keraji mandarin (small seedling)


I was told this hybrid (on grafted rootstock) was originally grown from a seedling that was some sort of hybrid that included C. ichangensis and Minneola tangelo in its lineage. It's very probably a M.I.C.

I don't have all the info about this variety, but it's very likely the result of several select hybridizations by cold-hardy citrus grower enthusiasts over many many years, a real labor of love. I'm expecting it will have a good balance of cold hardiness to edibility.

I'm in zone 8a, but we have a long cool season that doesn't really begin warming up until late May. So the growing season for citrus is very short.

Just thought some of you might be interested in some unusual varieties of cold-hardy citrus growing in a part of the country people normally don't try to grow citrus. (Olympia, WA)

Right now it's humid, overcast, and warm, but it hasn't significantly rained for the last few weeks. Very low precipitation in the Summer.


SoCal2warm

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2018, 08:20:55 PM »
I also have 'Arctic Frost' next to "Ten Degree" mandarin, and later hope to eventually make a hybrid.



Arctic Frost is hybrid between an early ripening variety of Satsuma and Changsha.


Ten Degree is a hybrid between Clementine and Yuzu.

maesy

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2018, 11:04:00 AM »
Why are you planting them so young?

They are very frost tender at that young age.
For me they should be at least two or better three years old after grafting.

SoCal2warm

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2018, 03:38:10 PM »
Ideally I should have waited until they were bigger, but I worried if I didn't get them in the ground they might not survive. I haven't been very good about maintaining them well in small containers.
In small containers they need constant attention and care to make sure they don't dry out (and they don't do well with waterlogged soil either). I just have way too many of them to put in larger containers.

The Winters here can actually be pretty mild (though long), so I'll just have to hope the small ones can survive. They have a much better chance in the ground than in a container if they're going to be left outside. The cold here mostly stays slightly above freezing. This January I went out and there were a lot of camellias in bloom, and there were even a few blooms on my rose bush (though they didn't look so well), though it was an unusual Winter this year. There are some people in the neighborhood growing bananas (the ornamental kind) outside.

SoCal2warm

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2018, 04:07:28 PM »
These are some keraji seedlings that will be kept inside:


eyeckr

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2018, 10:03:38 PM »
Nice collection! Good luck with your trees.

 

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