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Author Topic: Eremolemon  (Read 1040 times)

Zitrusgaertner

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Eremolemon
« on: April 04, 2018, 09:13:52 AM »
Dear Citrus-Connaisseurs, what is known about the cold hardiness of Eremocitrus glaucaXMeyer-Lemon? Fruit quality seems to be good and if it could withstand -10° or less it would be a candidate for my citrus project.

Radoslav

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Re: Eremolemon
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2018, 11:56:52 AM »
According to Z. Černoch, it withstood -15°C in the garden of Sebastien Berne in Martinques.
Also 'Eremoorange' - Citrus glauca x Citrus sinensis, both are used to make marmalade.

Ilya11

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Re: Eremolemon
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2018, 01:10:20 PM »
Sebastien( Alias)  tested it in a pot and reported -14C as a limit:
Coachella eremoleon R-14°c maturité:oct-dec qualité: XXXX
For eremorange in the ground he reports a similiar limit:
Eremocitrus sinensis T R-15°c maturité: qualité: XXXXX

My grafted eremorange in pot culture in Paris region has occasional branch damage due to wet conditions in autumn.
No fruits up to now.
Best regards,
                       Ilya

SoCal2warm

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Re: Eremolemon
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2018, 08:17:52 PM »
It was my understanding that Meyer Lemon is about the same cold hardiness as a mandarin (as it's basically believed to have originated from citron x mandarin hybridization) and that Australian Desert Lime (C. glauca) has about as much cold hardiness as Satsuma mandarin. But who knows? It's possible that combining different cold hardiness genes from two lineages that are so different from each other may end up getting something with even more cold resistance.


I think Meyer Lemon is a little bit more vigorous growing than mandarins though, the result of its citron parentage. For although the vulnerability of citron to cold sits right between the levels of limes and common lemons--that is to say very low tolerance to cold--the inclusion of this parentage may be allowing the Meyer Lemon to bounce back more easily from any cold damage, making it more resilient. I've read numerous reports of Meyer Lemon being able to survive (albeit not the best) in zone 8a, but never heard anything about about mandarins (other than Satsuma) growing in this zone, but that may just be because Meyer Lemons are a lot more popular than mandarins, so could just be due to a lower liklihood of ordinary people having experimented with them in this marginal climate zone.
Austalian desert lime, of course, is very drought tolerant and resilient (as it had to be in its native environment).

All I can comment is that, judging just by its parentage, I don't believe Eremolemon would be appropriate in climate zone 7, unless possibly if it was set up in a warmer microclimate.
(if you're familiar with how to shape a landscape to create a microclimate, things that help give maximum exposure to sun and retain heat)
« Last Edit: April 04, 2018, 08:50:10 PM by SoCal2warm »

Radoslav

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Re: Eremolemon
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2018, 02:10:17 AM »
Sebastien( Alias)  tested it in a pot and reported -14C as a limit:
Coachella eremoleon R-14°c maturité:oct-dec qualité: XXXX
For eremorange in the ground he reports a similiar limit:
Eremocitrus sinensis T R-15°c maturité: qualité: XXXXX

My grafted eremorange in pot culture in Paris region has occasional branch damage due to wet conditions in autumn.
No fruits up to now.

Here are pictures of Eremoorange  taken by Z. Černoch in Martinques in 2013. He said that plant was 2,5m high and crop was 10 fruits.



Judging by posts on czech citrus forum, eremorange needs to be a big plant to set fruits.

Millet

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Re: Eremolemon
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2018, 11:16:02 AM »
Very different foliage, and the growth is straight up.  What is the taste?
« Last Edit: April 05, 2018, 01:02:13 PM by Millet »

Radoslav

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Re: Eremolemon
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2018, 12:08:55 PM »
Very
 different foliage, and the growth is straight up.  What is the taste?

Those who ate eremorange, described the taste like very well balanced, not too sour, not too sweet.

00christian00

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Re: Eremolemon
« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2018, 01:04:47 PM »
I bought a grafted eremorange at a nursery with the fruits on. The fruits fallen soon and the taste was super sour.
Not sure if it was really an eremorange cause it looked different from another eremorange grown from cutting I had before that died.
It wasn't an Eremolemon or Eremocitrus for sure because the fruit was orange. I also have an Eremolemon which didn't fruit yet.
It could be mine was still young and did drop the fruit before ripening or it could be something else, maybe citrangeremo?
I doubt that even arrived in our country however.

Radoslav

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Re: Eremolemon
« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2018, 03:11:45 PM »
In Europe, there are:
brought by Bernhard Voss

Eremocitrus x Shekvasha mandarin (Orange fruits)
http://idtools.org/id/citrus/citrusid/factsheet.php?name=Eremocitrus+x+Shekwasha

Eremolemon
Eremocitrus glauca × Meyer lemon
http://www.citrusvariety.ucr.edu/citrus/eremolemon.html

Eremocitrus glauca - hybrid
http://www.citrusvariety.ucr.edu/citrus/eremocitrus_hybrid.html
 
Citrangeremo

Eremoorange (Erem.glauca x C.sinensis) (Orange fruits) from Otto Eisenhut



« Last Edit: April 05, 2018, 03:13:31 PM by Radoslav »

Moro

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Re: Eremolemon
« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2018, 11:16:01 AM »
My Eremolemon is from Eisenhut (catalogue id 94). I typically take it in the greenhouse when temperatures fall below -8C (17F) because I don't want to risk damaging the beautiful tree. It never had any significant damages at those temperatures. The fruit is very sour, makes nice marmalade, and ripens early.

Eisenhut has one planted in ground.




 

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