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Author Topic: Most exotic fruit for cool/short summers  (Read 204 times)

Florian

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Most exotic fruit for cool/short summers
« on: April 12, 2018, 04:21:00 PM »
I live in Switzerland, most years we're in zone 8a. Winters are usually long and very damp and summers lack heat. Prolonged freezes are not unusual.
To give you an idea: I can grow figs succesfully although the second crop only ripens in good years.

I have acquired some early pomegranates and a Kaki "early fuyu" but they haven't flowered yet.

Any additional ideas would be greatly appreciated.

Patanax

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Re: Most exotic fruit for cool/short summers
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2018, 03:33:17 PM »
A pawpaw maybe?

SoCal2warm

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Re: Most exotic fruit for cool/short summers
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2018, 08:29:19 PM »
Maybe the varieties of quince (particularly Russian) that are better for eating out of hand?

Some rare cold hardy citrus varieties can survive where you are.

Have you considered Chinese Bayberry (Myrica rubra) or che fruit (Maclura tricuspidata) ?
The Osage Orange is an interesting ornamental (despite the name, not citrus).

There are some Russian varieties of pomegranate that can survive, but where you are the fruits probably won't get very ripe or sweet.

There are also of course persimmons and Asian pears, which should have no problem, although they are not really all that uncommon.

How about lingonberries or cloudberries (Rubus chamaemorus), if you're going to look to the far North for something exotic. On that note, how about Brandywine raspberry, it's a hybrid between red raspberry and black raspberries native to North America. They have a somewhat blackberry-like taste and don't tend to spread out of bounds like regular raspberries.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2018, 08:34:11 PM by SoCal2warm »

kernol

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Re: Most exotic fruit for cool/short summers
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2018, 03:36:47 AM »
Pomegranates should work for you if you go for a cold-hardy and early riping variety since normal ones wouldnt ripe in time.

If you have a sheltered spot, Feijoa could work for you as well - maybe giving it some light protection (fleece) during winter months. Mine seems to be alive after this winter in zone 7a.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2018, 03:39:54 AM by kernol »

Florian

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Re: Most exotic fruit for cool/short summers
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2018, 08:20:19 AM »
Thanks everyone for the suggestions. There are some that I have never heard of, i.e. the Chinese bayberry which I will definitely check out.

Regarding pomegranates, I have been recommended the variety called Agat which is said to be both very coldhardy and early-ripening and as a plus does have soft seeds. Does anybody have one and can tell me more? I've just planted a small 3 litre plant.

Feijia survives but rarely fruits outdoors here, works well in a polytunnel though.

Btw. the Swiss are rather conservative gardeners – almost anything that isn't an apple or a cherry is pretty uncommon here:-).
« Last Edit: April 22, 2018, 08:42:18 AM by Florian »

Patanax

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Re: Most exotic fruit for cool/short summers
« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2018, 04:24:18 PM »
I have just looked up the Chinese Bayberry and all sites I've come across mention it only being cold-hardy down to zone 10?

SoCal2warm

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Re: Most exotic fruit for cool/short summers
« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2018, 07:45:59 PM »
I have just looked up the Chinese Bayberry and all sites I've come across mention it only being cold-hardy down to zone 10?

It can definitely grow in zone 9, and probably in zone 8.

Read the post here:
Quote
Myrica Rubra, page 2

Myrica rubra's common names include Yangmei in China, Yamamomo in Japan, Red Bayberry, Chinese Bayberry, and Yumberry.  According to the CRFG Fruit Gardener March & April 2008 issue, the fruit is called yang-mei in China, which means "poplar-plum".  A garden products importer from Indiana named Charles Stenftenagel was visiting a friend in Shanghai who bottled Myrica rubra juice.  The way the people pronounced yang-mei in their dialect was "yang-mee", which Mr. Stenftenagel thought sounded like "yummy" and in 2003 they started calling it "Yumberry" because they though that would be a catchy name to help them commercialize it.

The Chinese have harvested yang-mei from the wild for 7000 years and cultivated the trees for at least 2000 years.  It is a very popular fruit in China, which has 865,000 acres in production.  For comparison, the United States has about 432,000 acres of apples, about 856,000 of citrus trees, and 1,044,000 of grapes, the only American fruit crop with greater acreage.

It is a dioecious tree with male and female flowers on separate plants.  However some female trees will produce male flowers.  The tree can grow in poor soils because of its ability to fix nitrogen.  It prefers acid soil and enjoys a similar climatic range as citrus.  It is said that it is not grown in Hawaii because it does require a bit of chill, although in China there is a wide range of adaptation, including tropical varieties on Hainan, a large island in the south.  Recommended for Zones 8-10, can tolerate temperatures down to 16F.

http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=290.25
« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 07:53:24 PM by SoCal2warm »

scottsurf

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Re: Most exotic fruit for cool/short summers
« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2018, 08:51:45 PM »
may pop
cold hardy kiwi
mulberry
currants

SoCal2warm

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Re: Most exotic fruit for cool/short summers
« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2018, 10:38:02 PM »
Gooseberries

I'd also encorage you to look into less common rarer varieties for many different fruits, particularly plum and gooseberry. There can be a big difference between different varieties, and having a rare variety can be sort of similar to having an exotic species.

 

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