Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers

Tropical Fruit => Tropical Fruit Discussion => Topic started by: MangoCountry on June 11, 2018, 11:30:20 PM

Title: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: MangoCountry on June 11, 2018, 11:30:20 PM
For some reason (I'm addicted to seeking out and purchasing mango trees) I've been wanting to add a Pina Colada mango to my collection. I have never tried this fruit. I have a Coconut Cream and a Pickering, both having a coconutty flavor. If you've sampled this fruit Is this variety unique enough or even worth it for that matter. I'm not concerned with the supposed low production or lack of vigor.
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: koundog on June 12, 2018, 12:26:11 AM
It’s alright middle of the pack for me
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: RodneyS on June 12, 2018, 04:46:00 AM
Zill E-4 and M-4 are supposed to be great coconut-flavored mangoes. 
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: Squam256 on June 12, 2018, 07:40:07 AM
Pina Colada is incredible and definitely worth it.
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: mangomandan on June 12, 2018, 07:49:48 AM
What Squam said.   8)
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: MangoCountry on June 12, 2018, 09:23:26 AM
Do you have any of those trees for sale Alex? The only place I can find it is Excalibur and Id rather not go there.
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: zands on June 12, 2018, 09:48:42 AM
Is Pina Colada seed poly-embryonic or not? All input appreciated for an experiment.
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: MangoCountry on June 12, 2018, 11:13:22 AM
Pina Colada is polyembryonic
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: edzone9 on June 12, 2018, 12:21:24 PM
ALEX will you have PC fruit for sale this season ?

Thanks Ed
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: kc_moses on June 12, 2018, 02:49:53 PM
Do you have any of those trees for sale Alex? The only place I can find it is Excalibur and Id rather not go there.

Out of curiosity why would you rather not go to Excalibur? I'm starting to look for alternative nursery as well since Excalibur experience has been frustrating.
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: zands on June 12, 2018, 03:04:13 PM
Pina Colada is polyembryonic
But how many times have you seen this? From what I have read here some of the new Zill mangoes seeds can sprout poly-embryonic sometimes and mono-embryonic other times.
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: paulmctigue on June 12, 2018, 04:51:45 PM
Truly tropical sells trees
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: FruitFreak on June 12, 2018, 04:57:06 PM
Pina Colada is incredible and definitely worth it.

About how old until they start becoming productive and are they regular bearers? 
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: Cookie Monster on June 12, 2018, 05:45:47 PM
I love PC. One of my favorite mangoes. My tree has an excellent crop this year. Last couple of years, it failed to flower much; it also hasn't grown much -- which is fine by me (less pruning). Mine was on one of those "dwarfing" rootstocks that Gary Zill was playing with.
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: PurpleAlligator on June 12, 2018, 06:47:03 PM
My 4 year old tree has about 10 fruit for the first time ever. Itís not a small tree for me having grown fairly tall despite regular pruning.
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: zands on June 12, 2018, 11:38:36 PM
I love PC. One of my favorite mangoes. My tree has an excellent crop this year. Last couple of years, it failed to flower much; it also hasn't grown much -- which is fine by me (less pruning). Mine was on one of those "dwarfing" rootstocks that Gary Zill was playing with.
I also got Pina Colada tree on same dwarfing root stock from that Zill era. The root stock was a comically and freakish wide diameter. The rootstock was 2" wide with a 1"wide Pina Colada stuck into it. Grafted into it.

Pina Colada trees must be sold on a more conventional root stock these days? So will not be such slow growers? So one would think.
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: palmcity on June 13, 2018, 12:49:12 AM
I'm not concerned with the supposed low production or lack of vigor.
My tree has an excellent crop this year. Last couple of years, it failed to flower much; it also hasn't grown much -- which is fine by me (less pruning). Mine was on one of those "dwarfing" rootstocks that Gary Zill was playing with.
I love PC. One of my favorite mangoes. My tree has an excellent crop this year. Last couple of years, it failed to flower much; it also hasn't grown much -- which is fine by me (less pruning). Mine was on one of those "dwarfing" rootstocks that Gary Zill was playing with.
I also got Pina Colada tree on same dwarfing root stock from that Zill era. The root stock was a comically and freakish wide diameter. The rootstock was 2" wide with a 1"wide Pina Colada stuck into it. Grafted into it.

Pina Colada trees must be sold on a more conventional root stock these days? So will not be such slow growers? So one would think.

I greatly dislike dwarfing root stock and will probably never purchase another mango tree that I know is on dwarfing rootstock. My most disliked tree is my about 5-6 year old planted Pickering. It's still less than 3 1/2 feet from ground to top and it produces way too few mangos for it's spot in the sand in my yard.

In my yard, I think it's best to have trees that will quickly grow through fungus & other disease attacks. It reminds me of citrus and citrus greening/canker etc. The trees need to grow grow grow through any attacks... This dwarfing root stock does not cut it in my opinion... I have no problem trimming a healthy fast growing big tree, but if a small slow growing tree picks up a diseased area, it's hard to remove the area if small & it helps to have plenty of healthy limbs to cut off this affected area.

I would like to see all mangos in pots labeled as to rootstock type so I could avoid buying any dwarfing root stock. This would also make it easier for condo growers to identify & purchase these dwarf trees instead of me.

Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: Sleepdoc on June 13, 2018, 07:24:39 AM
I also have a PC on one of the experimental rootstocks.  Perfect vigor and size IMHO. 

PC is a flavor bomb.  Much different than CC or Pickering.

It has become a regular bearer for me, with good production over the last 3 seasons. 
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: Cookie Monster on June 13, 2018, 10:51:58 AM
I haven't noticed any increased disease issues due to dwarfing rootstock.

I guess this totally depends on situation. If one is only growing a couple of trees and desiring a large shade tree, then a full-size rootstock is more appropriate. However, when one has dozens of mature trees, pruning turns into a literal multi-month chore each and every summer -- which is doubly painful in the hot / humid weather and in addition to the normal maintenance activities (eg, fertilization, spraying, weeding, etc).

There is also a difference of perspective based on where one is in their growing journey. At the outset (the first 5 - 7 years), everyone looks forward to seeing rapid growth on their new trees. But when the maintenance kicks in and becomes the major component of one's free time, perspective tends to take a turn towards looking for less maintenance and more free time :-).

I greatly dislike dwarfing root stock and will probably never purchase another mango tree that I know is on dwarfing rootstock. My most disliked tree is my about 5-6 year old planted Pickering. It's still less than 3 1/2 feet from ground to top and it produces way too few mangos for it's spot in the sand in my yard.

In my yard, I think it's best to have trees that will quickly grow through fungus & other disease attacks. It reminds me of citrus and citrus greening/canker etc. The trees need to grow grow grow through any attacks... This dwarfing root stock does not cut it in my opinion... I have no problem trimming a healthy fast growing big tree, but if a small slow growing tree picks up a diseased area, it's hard to remove the area if small & it helps to have plenty of healthy limbs to cut off this affected area.

I would like to see all mangos in pots labeled as to rootstock type so I could avoid buying any dwarfing root stock. This would also make it easier for condo growers to identify & purchase these dwarf trees instead of me.
Title: Re: Pina Colada Mango
Post by: spaugh on June 13, 2018, 12:41:30 PM
I haven't noticed any increased disease issues due to dwarfing rootstock.

I guess this totally depends on situation. If one is only growing a couple of trees and desiring a large shade tree, then a full-size rootstock is more appropriate. However, when one has dozens of mature trees, pruning turns into a literal multi-month chore each and every summer -- which is doubly painful in the hot / humid weather and in addition to the normal maintenance activities (eg, fertilization, spraying, weeding, etc).

There is also a difference of perspective based on where one is in their growing journey. At the outset (the first 5 - 7 years), everyone looks forward to seeing rapid growth on their new trees. But when the maintenance kicks in and becomes the major component of one's free time, perspective tends to take a turn towards looking for less maintenance and more free time :-).

I greatly dislike dwarfing root stock and will probably never purchase another mango tree that I know is on dwarfing rootstock. My most disliked tree is my about 5-6 year old planted Pickering. It's still less than 3 1/2 feet from ground to top and it produces way too few mangos for it's spot in the sand in my yard.

In my yard, I think it's best to have trees that will quickly grow through fungus & other disease attacks. It reminds me of citrus and citrus greening/canker etc. The trees need to grow grow grow through any attacks... This dwarfing root stock does not cut it in my opinion... I have no problem trimming a healthy fast growing big tree, but if a small slow growing tree picks up a diseased area, it's hard to remove the area if small & it helps to have plenty of healthy limbs to cut off this affected area.

I would like to see all mangos in pots labeled as to rootstock type so I could avoid buying any dwarfing root stock. This would also make it easier for condo growers to identify & purchase these dwarf trees instead of me.
  smart man