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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Indian Spice Mangos
« on: Today at 01:17:19 PM »
That looks like a sunrise to me. Apparently, climate makes a difference.

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Indian Spice Mangos
« on: Today at 12:54:39 PM »
Yah, mangoes can easily be over a pound each. Flavor profile is somewhat similar to carrie. Flesh is soft and melting, no fiber.

3
Pretty nutty, eh?

4
:D Well, to be pedantic, the slightly underripe condition raises both the tart and SE Asian spice notes, which would contribute to the flavor complexity.

I was a little taken aback when they said that the fully ripe MC they were eating was "complex." I thought the mango was compost fodder the first 3 years I tried it because I was eating fully ripe, in which state the mango was pretty bland.

Try eating it when it just barely starts to yellow (still half green). If you snap off a leaf and smell the sap, it's a south east asian smell, but you have to eat them at the right stage. When fully ripe, the spice (and most of the flavor) is gone, and it's a fairly boring mango.

I don’t detect any spice flavor in Maha but everyone’s palate is different.

Some may say that "complexity" comes from being underripe.  Hahahahaha (sorry, Jeff...had to do it).  Then again, the mango in the video did not have the look of an underripe mango.

5
Try eating it when it just barely starts to yellow (still half green). If you snap off a leaf and smell the sap, it's a south east asian smell, but you have to eat them at the right stage. When fully ripe, the spice (and most of the flavor) is gone, and it's a fairly boring mango.

I don’t detect any spice flavor in Maha but everyone’s palate is different.

6
Dwarf Hawaiian.

I really like it. It is similar to Julie, but in my opinion slightly better tasting. The flesh can be soft; some people may not like that. Definitely worth trying. I just grafted over 1/2 of one of my mallikas to it. One of the most endearing characteristics of the tree is that it will literally bear fruit a year after being grafted (and every single year after that). The most precocious mango I've experienced. Growth rate is ridiculously slow.

Your angie must be receiving nitrogen.

In the video Har commented about the bitterness of Maha skin.  My Angie is much larger than my Pickering.  I have to top it every year.  With Pickering I only cut the lowest branches because I don't want the fruit to touch the ground.
Yeah I guess I should stop the nitrogen.  But Pickering's been getting nitrogen, too.  How do you rate the flavor of Dwarf Hawaiian, Jeff?

Jeff, are you talking about Sienta Lone? I have one fruot that is about 4 inches long, cant wait to try it. it is considered top mango and is highly prized.

7
I sense that this is a rhetorical question, but I use the squirrelinator. Once caught, the little bugger gets dispatched by a water dunking. https://squirrelinator.com/

Please explain the water trick?

Is this the motion detector that sprays water or something new that I am unaware of?

8
Yikes. Burning a coon alive is pretty mean. They're not much of a problem with regards to mangoes though. Probably 1% or less crop loss from them. They do sometimes ravage the sapodillas, snapping branches full of fruit as they climb. And every once in a while, they'll feast on jaboticaba. I'll find dozens of skins underneath the tree.

I use the water trick on the squirrels. I have a canal out back that makes the process pretty convenient. They only last about 10 seconds.

This old fellow caught a coon in his fruit but once he got it in the trap didn't really have a plan. He came up with a solution which wasn't socially acceptable and they put him through hell.

It's actually dangerous shooting into a trap, many don't have a gun or live in town. I've used a club, machete or pitchfork. My solution has been a drum full of water you can figure out how to use it. I'm sure I'd be pilloried by some but it has been considered humane in the past.

http://time.com/5371161/florida-man-burns-raccoon-over-eating-mangoes/

9
I really like it. It is similar to Julie, but in my opinion slightly better tasting. The flesh can be soft; some people may not like that. Definitely worth trying. I just grafted over 1/2 of one of my mallikas to it. One of the most endearing characteristics of the tree is that it will literally bear fruit a year after being grafted (and every single year after that). The most precocious mango I've experienced. Growth rate is ridiculously slow.

Your angie must be receiving nitrogen.

In the video Har commented about the bitterness of Maha skin.  My Angie is much larger than my Pickering.  I have to top it every year.  With Pickering I only cut the lowest branches because I don't want the fruit to touch the ground.
Yeah I guess I should stop the nitrogen.  But Pickering's been getting nitrogen, too.  How do you rate the flavor of Dwarf Hawaiian, Jeff?

10
Your angie must be receiving nitrogen.

In the video Har commented about the bitterness of Maha skin.  My Angie is much larger than my Pickering.  I have to top it every year.  With Pickering I only cut the lowest branches because I don't want the fruit to touch the ground.

11
Right. Dwarf Hawaiian is extremely petite. Awesome little tree.


Angie is another tree in that compact family of trees, on par with pickering. Only drawback is that it gets thracnose / scab really bad. Doesn't affect fruit quality much, but the tree can be really awgly. Angie is no longer in fashion, with all the new styles that have come out recently, but my wife and I still consider it a top tier mango.

In a no / low nitrogen scenario, PPK has been small for me. Mine (in ground for 4 years) is nary 6 - 7 feet tall.

So I changed the topic title.  My tree should have fruit next summer.  I'll return to this topic to comment on it, and anyone else with Maha Chanok experience can do the same.  The growth habit of my tree is close to optimal, Pickering being the gold standard.  (Honey Kiss is another compact beauty.)

I have all three, and fruiting. The most compact is Pickering, followed by Honey Kiss and the Maha Chanok. In terms of taste, it is Honey Kiss, Maha Chanok and Pickering, in that order, at least for me. Maha has the most shelf life, but is bitter near the skin.

This was the first time that my Angie had fruits on it; I really liked it, perhaps even more than Maha Chanok. Another variety that really stays small (perhaps the most compact of all) and tastes awesome is Dwarf Hawaiian. Small fruit but loaded with flavor.

12
:D The raccoons are usually pretty respectful eaters. They typically only eat the ones that fall (or that ripen in the tree), and they will often eat the entire fruit, just leaving the seed and some peel. So the crop loss is minimal, and I'm happy to share with them :D

Squirrels, on the other hand, are a pain in the neck. They will munch on mangoes that are barely mature green -- nibbling a little bit from each fruit. Rats operate similarly and are equally annoying.

Thanks.

I took most of the fruits today.

A family of fat raccoons visited and littered the bottom of the tree with ripe half eaten fruit.  I saw a couple scurrying around from inside the house but they took off (more like rolled along), the last raccoon was still in the three when I got outside.  I gave it a start and it almost fell off the tree.  It scampered down and ran off without its prize.

Looks like nature has determined that the fruits are ready to be picked. 

I left a few on, I am sure they will come back for them.  If not I will have more to pick in a week.

Took the opportunity to harvest some of my Keith too.  The skin was beginning to crack on a few of them.

13
Angie is another tree in that compact family of trees, on par with pickering. Only drawback is that it gets thracnose / scab really bad. Doesn't affect fruit quality much, but the tree can be really awgly. Angie is no longer in fashion, with all the new styles that have come out recently, but my wife and I still consider it a top tier mango.

In a no / low nitrogen scenario, PPK has been small for me. Mine (in ground for 4 years) is nary 6 - 7 feet tall.

So I changed the topic title.  My tree should have fruit next summer.  I'll return to this topic to comment on it, and anyone else with Maha Chanok experience can do the same.  The growth habit of my tree is close to optimal, Pickering being the gold standard.  (Honey Kiss is another compact beauty.)

I have all three, and fruiting. The most compact is Pickering, followed by Honey Kiss and the Maha Chanok. In terms of taste, it is Honey Kiss, Maha Chanok and Pickering, in that order, at least for me. Maha has the most shelf life, but is bitter near the skin.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Is this mammea Americana?
« on: August 19, 2018, 02:09:48 PM »
I was scratching my head to try to figure out what that fruit looks like, and I just recalled -- It looks similar to sansapote / sunsa. Note the green coloration of the skin when you zoom in.

15
Soursop are semi-tolerant of low light conditions. I'm not sure I'd prune it. Since it is a low light condition, the prune response might not give you a different result that what you already have. It's just going to send shoots straight to get the light that's above the roofline. I'd just stake it, fertilize it, and wait for the trunk to thicken.

Yes PI.  It's located between two buildings.  There's no way to increase existing light conditions :(
Funny thing is that I had planted several plants around the house with different light conditions with this being the one with the least amount of light received.  Yet this is the best performing one so far. 

So, if I follow Stevo's advise and chop the top off, will it work in this situation?

John, I'll have to search where I read about hand pollination.

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Fertilizing 0-0-50
« on: August 18, 2018, 02:14:21 PM »
Compost is a dual edged sword. Over time, it can actually lock up micronutrients and leads to calcium deficiency. Compost is generally high in P and K and provides a good base, but if you don't provide supplemental nutrients, it will lead to nutrient deficiency over time. I experienced this first hand, after incorporating about 1,000 cubic yards of tree trimmer waste (which is now solid black compost several inches thick).

From my experience (and per Har's (guanabanus) guidance) best for this area is to use 2 products sold here in South Florida: Har's own 0-3-16 mix for mangoes and Helena Chemical's 8-2-12 mix for nitrogen loving trees. Both are slow release and contain a micronutrient package adequate for south florida soils. You can purchase both at Truly Tropical in Delray. Neither of these two products is cheap, but the increment in quality is far greater than the increment in price over the other mixes.

Remember that the Potassium-only fertilizer regime for Mangos, is for rockdale soils in the Redlands/Homestead area.  That soil is high in Calcium and is pretty well supplied with many other nutrients, except potassium.

In many of our other types of soil, we are not going to get good fruit set without adding Boron, Zinc, Calcium, Magnesium, etc., along with high Potassium.

Do you have any recommendations for where to buy these micro-nutrients locally, e.g. South Florida. I sent in a soil sample to University of Florida Labs to test for PH and NPK to see what I may need to add for those. Also would home compost provide enough of the micro-nutrients needed? e.g. 4 cups per tree every 3 months.

17
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Flying Fox Fruits Nursery
« on: August 18, 2018, 12:11:21 PM »
Is that the same as pakistani black with the long fruits? I actually just bought one of those a few days ago. Really delicious fruit.

OK. Yah, we got two. One was for the Boss' friend :D

Im with ya on Tice, in both taste and size...unfortunately there is nothing comparable.

You have the green for the Boss (didnt you guys get two of them?), that is the sweetest.

You might like the Pakistani Red.  It has more of a red berry flavor in its profile.

18
I've had the same issue. Some mangoes tend towards this more than others. Seems like the later season mangoes are more prone to it.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Is this mammea Americana?
« on: August 18, 2018, 12:06:51 PM »
Hmm. I've eaten a lot of mammea (both in the US and in Central America) and have never seen one like OP's picture. Note that the skin color of the fruit in the picture has green. Mammea will be all earthy brown. Also, the fibrous flesh remnants on the seed is something I've never seen in a mammea. It definitely looks remotely similar, but not like any mammea I've ever seen.

20
Yes, Maha Chanok is a very good tasting mango, one of my favorites in most years. The tree also has desirable characteristics: it's relatively small and disease resistant.

That particular maha appears to have been picked TOO LATE (ie, allowed to ripen on the tree). The reason I say that is because I can note some jelly seed. If you look closely, you'll note the darker flesh right next to the seed. This year, I had to pick mine mature green to avoid the jelly seed. For some reason, this year was worse than others for internal breakdown issues on a number of mangoes.

Also, that Maha Chanok is overripe for my own taste preference. The fruit is completely yellow, and there are a couple of post harvest anthracnose spots forming. I would have eaten it 2 - 3 days earlier. At that fully ripe stage, the fruit is mostly just sweet. Eaten a little less underripe, the maha has 2 characteristics that I enjoy: some tart and the south east asian spice (I call it coca cola flavor).

21
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Flying Fox Fruits Nursery
« on: August 17, 2018, 10:26:19 PM »
OK. Yah, we got two. One was for the Boss' friend :D

Im with ya on Tice, in both taste and size...unfortunately there is nothing comparable.

You have the green for the Boss (didnt you guys get two of them?), that is the sweetest.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Is this mammea Americana?
« on: August 17, 2018, 10:23:53 PM »
Does not look like any mammea I've eaten. Mammea generally has crunchy orange flesh with a bit of an apricot flavor.

23
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Flying Fox Fruits Nursery
« on: August 17, 2018, 04:38:57 PM »
OK. I like sweet + tart, but the Boss likes hers pure sweet. If it tastes anything like the tice (not sure if you're had that one), then I'd be down. I love Tice mullbary, but the tree is gargantuan.

What's the flavor of the Thai Dwarf Mulberry like?

u can eat them a bit early, and they are tart, with a snap, crispy almost like baby corn!  You can pick them without them staining your hands, unlike most other varieties I have, that are softer fleshed, and leak juice on your fingers.

then u can eat them fully ripe, when they are quite sweet, but also have a touch of tart.

the main attraction for this variety IMO is the dwarf size, and incredible productivity, and large size of fruits!  They are great for making pies, or using in cooking, but also very good for eating fresh. 

If you are looking for an all sweet mulberry, with no tartness at all, then this one is not for you.

24
Not sure how much dough you're willing to throw at this, but you could offer to relocate the tree. Palm trees generally relocate pretty well. But you need a bunch of brutes with shovels or heavy equipment to do it.

25
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Flying Fox Fruits Nursery
« on: August 17, 2018, 11:21:58 AM »
What's the flavor of the Thai Dwarf Mulberry like?

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