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Messages - Triloba Tracker

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1
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Yellowing stem on blueberries.....
« on: June 13, 2019, 07:01:52 PM »
I should add that Iím not in Southern California and I donít  grow blueberries, so take what I say with a grain of salt.
I do stand by my generalized comments  ;D

2
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Yellowing stem on blueberries.....
« on: June 13, 2019, 06:53:50 PM »
Really hard to tell - more pics of the leaves might help.
But it could be overwatering even from those pics. Since you have in a pot itís always a risk.
Drooping or wilted leaves can actually be a sign of overwatering. The brown at the base gives me the reaction of something rotting, not drying out.
Is the potting mix soaking wet if you poke your finger in the drainage hole(s)?

3
if you are in the area, let me know, because i'm selling freeze dried rare fruit now locally ( I'm not set up to ship yet, but i'm working on it!)

Sounds cool! not to hijack this topic but what kind of equipment and cost is involved in freeze-drying?

I have thought about freeze-drying Asimina triloba. Consuming dehydrated or "leathered" pawpaw can supposedly can lead to intense stomach upset, but I wonder about freeze-drying.

4
Yeah I think there is conflicting info on, for example, the natural range of pawpaw.
I'm not an expert in climatology or geography, but they do grow in Ontario and Michigan, pretty high up there.

I'm with SeaWalnut - if it were me, i would definitely try it.

I'd recommend painting the trunks with white latex paint to prevent sunscald in the winter.

5
There are no absolutes in plant growing, however. Iím just stating what I believe is a general truism.

If one is creative enough, we can always overcome limitations of the general rules. I have challenged many rules in gardening and got away with it, but still based on scientific principles applied within the context of the problem.

Agree. Thanks!

6
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« on: June 07, 2019, 02:03:32 PM »
Very cool!

7
There is not such thing as a too big pot,the bigger the better.
Except for bonsai .

I would politely disagree with this   ;D ;D....you can totally have too big of a pot in relation to the size of the rootball.
This is why nurseries, etc, gradually increase the size of their pots. Otherwise they would plant seeds in 15 gallon pots  ;D ;)

Too much pot in relation to roots usually leads to overwatering/root rot.

So planting in the ground would be the worst?

Well, thereís a huge difference between a pot and the earth.
The dynamics of water movement in a container are vastly different than the earth, not to mention the dynamics of the potting mix in the pot.
Size/space is not the problem in and of itself Itís not that a plantís roots can have too much room. The problem is water. If you are beginner like the original poster of this topic and especially if youíre using actual dirt in your pot (as he is), I would be very concerned about root rot in a too-large pot.

If you are using a gritty mix, something highly porous, you might be able to get away with it.

A link to the world famous Al from the old gardenweb forum. Al is the inventor of Alís Gritty Mix
https://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/527353/

A few links on the principle of gradual up-potting.
https://surna.com/up-potting-the-importance-of-proper-potting/
https://www.houzz.com/discussions/2059916/up-potting-jes-what-is-that-all-about
https://www.bioadvanced.com/articles/choosing-right-pot-plants

There are no absolutes in plant growing, however. Iím just stating what I believe is a general truism.

8
There is not such thing as a too big pot,the bigger the better.
Except for bonsai .

I would politely disagree with this   ;D ;D....you can totally have too big of a pot in relation to the size of the rootball.
This is why nurseries, etc, gradually increase the size of their pots. Otherwise they would plant seeds in 15 gallon pots  ;D ;)

Too much pot in relation to roots usually leads to overwatering/root rot.

9
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: How to make potting soil more acidic
« on: June 06, 2019, 04:33:30 PM »
you can water with an acidic solution. You can dilute sulfuric acid, purchase "pH Down" which is used in hydroponics (just concentrated acids), or you could use vinegar.

Get some of the pH testing drops so you can test the pH of the water before using.

That's what I'd do in your situation.

If the plants were in the ground, you could still water with acidic water but you could also use elemental sulfur around the plant/tilled into the top of the soil. It slowly brings down the soil pH but may not keep it there without repeated applications.

10
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: American persimmon
« on: May 30, 2019, 03:43:22 PM »
To me, Asian persimmons have almost no flavor, just sweet. I also donít like the sometimes firm texture.

I will say, there's an orchard in California that sells dried fuyu persimmons that are really, really good. Not boldly flavored but still really fun.
I buy them whenever I can at TJMaxx, the only place i've seen them here in the southeast.

Bella Viva Orchards.

Just dried persimmon slices, nothing added. Mmmmmmmm  (but not as flavorful as american persimmons off the tree!!)

11
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« on: May 30, 2019, 09:27:23 AM »
Whoa, very interesting! I can only imagine the fragrance  ;D

Iíve not done much work with manure but have always thought fresh manure would burn plants.
Cow manure I guess is not very ďhotĒ compared to other manures....

12
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: My small fruit tree orchard
« on: May 27, 2019, 05:33:24 PM »
Looking good, Luis!!
Mmmmm blackberries

13
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: American persimmon
« on: May 27, 2019, 09:04:19 AM »
To me, Asian persimmons have almost no flavor, just sweet. I also donít like the sometimes firm texture.
American persimmons are also very sweet but are very richly-flavored. Almost like pumpkin pie (cinnamon, nutmeg, clove). A wonderful treat.
Iím speaking here of wild fruit. So with these of course the downside is usually small seedy fruits. But the flavor and soft texture is still amazing to me.

14
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Cherimoya/Pawpaw hybrid
« on: May 22, 2019, 04:39:54 PM »
So, fill in the blanks for this Mendelian flunky....

What does all this tell us about the possible pathway to, say, a seedless pawpaw? Someone needs to start crossing Asimina triloba with Annona cherimola x atemoya backcrossed progeny?

15
does anyone have experience rooting cuttings? Advice/instructions?

16
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Cherimoya/Pawpaw hybrid
« on: May 22, 2019, 11:39:20 AM »
It seems that spontaneous triploids and  tetraploids are observed in cherimolaX atemoya backcrosses.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6378316/

Triploids seedlings  also occur in Asimina in areas with high temperature fluctuation during flowering
https://www.jstor.org/stable/2481881?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

That  means that a sufficient number of unreduced diploid pollen grains is produced in Asimina and can be used to pollinate flowers of cherimolaX atemoya that  has a natural tendency to produce fertile unreduced female gametes.
This may result in tetraploid and probably fertile AnonaXAsimina plants.

That C i made in college genetics is coming back to haunt me.....  ???

17
Had regents fruit for me this year the berries do taste good. Also have autumn brilliance hopefully will fruit next year
Thanks for the report! Keep us posted

18
I think it was the oil.It happened to somme of my trees last year when i treated them against aphids with oil and dishwashing detergent mixed in water.If it growing actively you could give it somme fertiliser and Asimina really likes a rich soil.

Thanks for the input ....I had used the neem extract for a few weeks with no apparent issues. Wasn't a problem until i used the captan.
However, there's a slight chance it could just be rapid advancement of the fungus (Diplocarpon).

But at any rate - was just wondering about trying to give it some fuel to reduce stress on the plant and its reserve energy.

Would use an organic nitrogen source to reduce potential of adverse affects.

19
Its a bad idea to give it extra nitrogen until it starts to grow new leaves.What type of tree it is?And did you burned it with  the neem oil?

Asimina triloba....I think it was a combination of neem extract followed a few days later with captan.  :o Live and learn  :-\

It's not lost all its leaves (yet?) and it's still actively growing.

20
One of my trees is dropping its leaves due to fungal infection, chemical burn, or a combination of both.

I was wondering if it would be helpful to give it a little nitrogen, thinking that it may need help regrowing all those leaves.

Is this advisable, or is there even something else that would help?

Of course, i could do nothing....

21
I have two small trees, one is the balerina variety...

Interesting! I've not heard of that variety. The most common one i've seen sold for fruit is "regent"

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: New guanabana disease?
« on: May 20, 2019, 02:28:17 PM »
Are you using ďmoldĒ interchangeably with ďfungus?Ē
Just clarifying. Thanks!

23
Seems like Serviceberry or Juneberry (Amelanchier species) should have its own thread here.

There are a few random mentions of it on the forum but nothing consolidated.

I just harvested some from a parking lot flowerbed for the second time In a three year span.


I was and am so surprised at how good these berries are. This treeís fruit is really sweet and refreshing, with flavors similar to peach or muscat grape.

For now my burning question is how to propagate this particular plant. I welcome all advice.

But otherwise I hope folks will post useful info of any kind pertaining to this fruit.

Thanks!

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: New guanabana disease?
« on: May 20, 2019, 08:16:25 AM »
How much Chamomille tea per gallon or acre?

Quite a few have been trying https://www.autoflower.net/forums/threads/jadam-korean-organic-farming.68734/
I make ordinary tea,one bag to one cup of water and boil it well.This concentration beated the strongest bordelaise concentration allowed for orchards.One whoole tea box with 20 bags its enough to make one gallon and a quarter of tea.It doesnt kill even the most tender plants that just germinated from seed.The tea its soo effective that
 you could dilute it a lot and would still work . Neem oil its a good insect repellent not antifungic.

I've read before about chamomile tea in reference to preventing damping-off with seeds. So, it makes sense to try it on trees. I admit it sounds too good to be true, but I am going to try it.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: New guanabana disease?
« on: May 19, 2019, 07:33:12 PM »
Iím desperate for any successful antifungal for my annonaceae
Neem extract is worthless
Tried Captan but jury is still out. I tested on one previously untreated branch and had no ill effects. However, I sprayed on trees previously sprayed with neem extract and I think it started to burn them.
Probably stupid on my part.

Anyway- this diplocarpon fungus really has me down.

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