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Messages - Cookie Monster

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1
We have a number of other fruits, but most are still not large enough to produce consistent selling quantities.

As for mangoes, we currently have: NDM, Carrie, Coco cream, sweet tart, guava, golden queen, edgar, pickering, duncan, mallika, cac, angie, Mahachanok, keitt, Dot, Venus. I need to eventually create a spreadsheet, as I'm going by memory, and I always forget a couple.

My wife is the one who sells the fruit. She normally just sells from makeshift roadside stands (ie, out of the back of her van :-). But this year, we had a pretty good crop. The cool winter combined with the fact that our 4+ year old planting in the southern lot is finally coming online means a bit of a bumper crop... at least what one could consider a bumper crop from about 6/10 of an acre of land :-).

2
Yah, no need for me to get the CA inspection police riled up :-). I know when I've driven into CA, there is a military style checkpoint looking for fresh fruits.

The reason why Florida cannot ship mangoes to CA is due to a CDFA rule.
https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/factsheets/BringingFruitsVeggies_to_CA.pdf

So Florida doesn't have a certificate??? [originally] I thought this meant packing houses not having "pest eradication equipment" that meets CA requirements....but then it says that the only restricted areas are some "counties" in PR, FL, and Texas for mangos to CA due to caribbean and Mexican fruit fly.
I recall that mangoes can't be sent from Hawaii to CA (due to seed weevil), but that is not identified in the CDFA link.  So I'm still a little confused on CA rules.  So one can ship mangos from AZ across into CA with no restrictions?

3
It is growing super slowly, maybe a foot a year. It has set fruit a few times, but the fruit keep falling off. This time, it had a near golf ball sized fruit that I thought was going to hold, but ended up falling :-(.

Jeff,
How's your Chintalala mamey doing?

4
J-12 is the experimental seedling id. I believe it was baptized 'Super Julie' by Sheehan. And, Dr Campbell decided to name it Fairchild Ruby.

And, yah, it does taste like mango dipped in gasoline :D. My wife likes it though.

5
Yes, sweet tarts have long shelf life. Can also be picked very green and will ripen with good brix. Very versatile mango. Only major drawback might be appearance -- small and green.

6
Cleft is best on the new sprouts. Veneer can be a challenge due to how soft the wood is. Use fully hardened scions (not tender red-stage ones). Tender scions die too quickly. Fully hardened scions can last longer (to wait for cambium growth).

No need for a greenhouse. However, if you want to increase your chances of a take, you can leave 2 leaves on the scion, cut such that only about 1/3 of each leaf remains, and wrap the entire 1 gallon container in a plastic bag. Keep in the shade until scion starts to grow, then remove bag and move to sunny area.

Nonetheless, just a typical cleft graft (with no leaves on the scion) should give you 50% take or better.

7
Carrie is normally a divisive mango, with some who adore it and others who hate it. However, I believe that the majority of the latter group have never tasted a carrie at the right stage of ripeness. Offering a carrie at the perfect stage to a yard visitor usually results in a "wow -- this is what a carrie tastes like!" reaction.

It is a delectable mango -- a perfect mix of sweet and tart without that funky odor -- when eaten before the skin is yellow (just a couple of small yellow patches and any amount of give to pressure are good indicators). Moreover, a carrie should never be allowed to ripen on the tree, which is what most novice growers do, assuming that best flavor is obtained by allowing fruit to mature on tree. NDM is similar -- best picked green, ripened indoors, and eaten when the skin is mostly green but with a faint yellow hue.

PS -- Carrie is not a shipping mango.

Agree. It's also not an eating mango or a growing mango. Blech!

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Bud Grafting T-Bud Graft Method
« on: June 22, 2018, 03:07:09 PM »
Yes, but it's more difficult than a side veneer. Not much point in budding mango unless you're a commercial grafter looking to maximize budwood. Side veneer is generally best for top working.

Can we do this method of grafting for top working multiple varieties into one tree?

9
ST is probably my #1 fav mango at the moment. But, I'm a little surprised that yours had jelly seed. I don't think I've ever seen a ST with jelly seed before.

I have seen more jelly seed than usual this year, and the early LZ and coco cream were indeed bland. LZ normally starts to ripen in July, so a June LZ would be really early and understandably bland.

The vast majority of my coco cream crop, though, has been outstanding. Rob had suggested that coco cream needs a few years before it starts showing what it's capable of, and my trees have finally started strutting their stuff. I had a huge crop of really delicious mangoes. It is certainly not an in-your-face, intense mango flavor like ST or pina colada. However, the flavor is very smooth and pleasing with a complexity of flavors ranging from pina colada to citrus to coconut.

PS -- Carrie is not a shipping mango. For one, it bruises ridiculously easily. Secondly, it is not very good when fully ripe. The carrie should probably never be shipped unless the shipping time can be confined to a day or two and the mango can be wrapped in a way that completely prevents damage to due brute mail workers chucking parcels around.

10
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Florida Mangoes for Sale
« on: June 21, 2018, 09:27:57 PM »
We have about 30 different cultivars. We're located in Tamarac near Commercial and University. Message me for address. Price is $2 / pound.

Also, we can ship within the continental US (just not to CA). Large USPS priority boxes are $50, which includes the shipping fee.

11
Also get some of the slow release 8-2-12 with minors. Many other fruit trees do very poorly without nitrogen. No nitrogen for mangos, but give nitrogen to pretty much everything else.

And, if you have a mango tree that's struggling to grow (as NDM #4 can do), N is a good addition.

Yeah been trying to get to Truly tropical to get some of the zero nitrogen fert to start per our pm. But their hours make it very difficult.

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Tree (not as expected) Question
« on: June 21, 2018, 02:30:42 PM »
Pictures?

Fruit can develop more fiber than usual if ripened too early.

13
Fertilizer helps with production.

From what I've seen, OS is probably more vigorous than LZ (and LZ seems to be more vigorous than PPK).

Whats the growth rate of OS? Similar to PPK and LZ?

Guess will let my PPK be then lol has had poor production last 2 years though. Probably my fault.

14
Interesting. It must evaporate more water than the other plants tested.

15
Small scions and depends on the cultivar. Monoembryonic seedlings are generally sufficiently thick. For polyembryonic seedlings (which are thinner), there is a technique where one tips the scion donor tree before planting the seed to produce thin shoots. I think the trick is to tip just after a flush point / node (vs below it), which produces a large amount of thin shoots.

When I've grafted recently sprouted seedlings like this, I've always favored monoembryonic seedlings. I know nurseries like turpentine (which is polyembryonic), but I've had excellent success with monoembryonic seedlings, such as glenn.

Mango seedling can be grafted 3 weeks after sprouting (while still tender and "red stage") with high rate of success. The seed generally has a store of energy for 2 flushes, so if you can graft on the first flush, there is still enough energy to push the scion to a full flush. That flush is then used to provide energy to the tree.

Just wondering about how low it takes for Turpentine seeds to grow to 3 gallon grafting size?

Single bud or small scions?  It seems like the seedli gs are really small to be grafting to at that point no?  Need steady hands?

16
We have an Asian (Vietnamese?) lady that will come each year and ask to buy the entire crop of NDMs.

17
Bummer. 3.5 miles inland is pretty close to shore. I'm a full 10+ miles inland -- although I'm in a very urban setting which means less foliage and therefore less humidity (via evapotranspiration). Surprised you're having issues.

Thanks, Jeff. I am very much hoping that one way or another LZ will be available from my favorite purveyors.
My non-spray program was due to a lack of motivation. My diabetes got a lot worse, and these days I have to limit myself to about a tablespoon of mango per day.  :(
If I have more energy next year I'll get back on board.

I'm about 3 1/2 miles inland, backing up to a canal.
Some of my other cultivars look fine (so far). Too early to know how they will ripen.

18
Just got it. I don't normally check that email addy. Best is to use the messaging feature here on the forum.

19
Yes, I actually have 2 clonal seedlings which have both been in production for a few years. I haven't noted any variation between the two nor between mine and Walter's tree. I selected those two from a group of several dozen seeds, based on my knowledge of the tree on Walter's property -- leaf shape, growth habit, and sap smell.

I think LZ is the superior selection, but I do have a "collect them all" approach to anything in that flavor line.

It's generally a top-tier mango, like PPK, LZ, Sweet Tart, OE, etc. But, I slightly prefer LZ over OS.

OS does get jelly seed, and it's been rather prone to powdery mildew infection. Mine has also had a tendency to grow more than fruit -- not sure if this is just an issue with my tree or whether that's common to the cultivar.

1.  Is it better than Orange Essense, PPK & LZ aka the GOAT according to some fans.

2.  Are they likely to have any other common problems?  i.e - low yield, disease, uneven ripening, jelly seed, etc.

Cookie Monster, yours OS is a seedling of OS correct? wondering if there are any variation/disease resistance, usually seedlings are better in disease resistance terms.

20
Mango seedling can be grafted 3 weeks after sprouting (while still tender and "red stage") with high rate of success. The seed generally has a store of energy for 2 flushes, so if you can graft on the first flush, there is still enough energy to push the scion to a full flush. That flush is then used to provide energy to the tree.

Just wondering about how low it takes for Turpentine seeds to grow to 3 gallon grafting size?

21
It's generally a top-tier mango, like PPK, LZ, Sweet Tart, OE, etc. But, I slightly prefer LZ over OS.

OS does get jelly seed, and it's been rather prone to powdery mildew infection. Mine has also had a tendency to grow more than fruit -- not sure if this is just an issue with my tree or whether that's common to the cultivar.

1.  Is it better than Orange Essense, PPK & LZ aka the GOAT according to some fans.

2.  Are they likely to have any other common problems?  i.e - low yield, disease, uneven ripening, jelly seed, etc.

22
You must be a ways inland. While I've seen MBBS on LZ, it's generally an isolated fruit here and there, which has been an issue on a number of other trees in my orchard.

If one is unwilling to spray fungicide (and especially those living inland or in a rural setting, where humidity is higher), then only a handful of cultivars will produce well in those circumstances.

PS: You guys need to try eating your NDMs slightly under-ripe -- before they fully develop the yellow coloration. Definitely not boring when eaten in this state. Splitting is an issue with the NDM #4 clone, which unfortunately is the one being sold by most nurseries today -- probably because the previously popular clone took a long time to begin bearing. #4 also can refuse to grow sometimes.

Lemon Zest is seriously susceptible to bacterial rot, or whatever it's called. I'm guessing this problem will spread to your area at some point. Perhaps an effective treatment for this will be found? Hard to speculate. At the moment it doesn't look like I'll get more than a couple of edible fruits from my tree. (It should be noted that I sprayed no copper or fungicides on any of my trees this year.)

NDM is kind of boring, as previously noted. And it splits.  Rosigold tastes best if it ripens in July rather than March.

I have been unable to keep Venus alive. Your mileage may vary. 

My Spirit of '76 had a large crop of excellent mangos last year. This year it is again loaded with beautiful fruit. I don't know yet how they will ripen. I am hoping that it is more disease-resistant than, for example, Kent.

23
I'd probably pull spirit of 76 and Rosigold... at least that's what I did at my place :D

24
From what I've seen, OS is probably more vigorous than LZ (and LZ seems to be more vigorous than PPK).

Whats the growth rate of OS? Similar to PPK and LZ?

25
I was thinking lemon zest  as well.

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