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21
Try eating it when it just barely starts to yellow (still half green). If you snap off a leaf and smell the sap, it's a south east asian smell, but you have to eat them at the right stage. When fully ripe, the spice (and most of the flavor) is gone, and it's a fairly boring mango.

I don’t detect any spice flavor in Maha but everyone’s palate is different.

Jeff, I tried some slightly less ripe last year and it did have a slightly better overall flavor. Mango Fruit grown in SoCal hang on the tree for extended periods of time due to our relatively cooler weather and I wonder if the extended hanging causes the Asian spice notes to fade away.

Now that I think about it, someone on the forum mentioned eating a Maha in the green stage so I tried it last year on a damaged fruit and I did detect a little Asian spice but in the green stage, my Maha was sour.

Simon
22
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Long term cold hardy citrus breeding project
« Last post by mikkel on Today at 09:05:55 AM »
populations size is what me makes think about the most. I am just in the beginning of everything and did only my first small scale hybridisations. That is fine for the start but I know that I need (and want) more seedlings to do selection.

I see 2 main issues in practical work. In the south it would be easier to produce large amount of seedlings but you have to wait for the chance of frost tests. That means you keep more seedlings as you need. (fortunately not my position  ::) )
In the north (like me) it is much more difficult to produce enough seedlings for frost tests. Due to limited space in greenhouse etc. Most seedlings grow very slowly in their 1st season here in our climate. So it is probably better to do frost tests in the 2nd season but that is a matter of space. Small seedlings will be killed for sure whether potentially hardy or not. Too small is too small :(
So it is even much more unlikely to find a hardy one among the small number of seedlings. To talk about edibility is a whole other thing...

I was thinking about a garden in the south, dreaming of Ventimiglia, Italy were I once lived for a short time, but that is far from reality for me. Theoretically it would make it possible for me to produce a lot of seedlings  without to worry about the winter and do large scale frost tests here in the north.
I am still thinking about this possibilty but it only will come in reach in far far future. Now I barely manage to handle my 2nd home and work 160km from here.

Still only spinning around but I keep thinking about that. Especially about how to handle it now...not in future.

23
Hmm. Coco Cream should say Edward x Gary

I thought that was Edgar. Iol
24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Last post by simon_grow on Today at 08:56:45 AM »
A friend of mine bought a giant Yellow Megalanthus DF from 99 Ranch market and it had a stub of a vine so he grafted it onto another DF rootstock. Shortly after the graft, he noticed new growth from the stub. Here are some pictures







Simon

Here is an update of the graft my friend did.


Simon
25
I agree that pictures or a video will help. Sapote, this sounds similar to how I do bark grafts when I convert a larger Mango tree.

Simon
26
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Last post by guardian123abc on Today at 08:41:57 AM »
Any update on your trial, Sandy?

Thanks!
I was surprised myself to find one with a niece piece of the stem still attached.
I'm going to try to root the cutting, since I'm not that experienced with the latter of the 2 methods.
The fruit itself was still sweet and delicious even though the skin had lots more green than the ones I usually purchased.
I'm going to be looking to see if I can find more with the same size stem I got this time around to try the grafting method.
Crossing my fingers and hope I find more.
I think the cashier thought I was crazy to have bought such green fruit...lol

27
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Last post by guardian123abc on Today at 08:36:16 AM »
Is there any other alternative if I have a similar stub of a vine, but no rootstock to graft on to?

A friend of mine bought a giant Yellow Megalanthus DF from 99 Ranch market and it had a stub of a vine so he grafted it onto another DF rootstock. Shortly after the graft, he noticed new growth from the stub. Here are some pictures

Simon
28
Caesar figuring out companion plantings and making them work is probably one of the hardest exercises you can do. It will probably take years to become good at it along with some problems and even failures. I've been trying out some and there are almost always things to learn about how they cooperate, proper spacing, timing of planting/harvesting, and the difficulty of working in a less concentrated crop scenario of polyculture compared to a monoculture. There's lots to learn and share which might benefit others.

Since most here are involved in trees I'll show an example of what looks like a successful example of such a guild of annual plants cooperating with a new planting of mango trees. The scene is a 130 ft (40 meters)long raised bed of Mahachanok mango trees interplanted with a mix of sweet potato and ordinary peanuts. The beds are native sand topped with 4"(10 cm) compost, peanuts were planted at 18" (45 cm)spacing directly on top of the compost then covered with mulch. Sweet potato cuttings were inserted into the mulch at 24" (60 cm)spacing between peanuts. Centered between each mango tree are banana trees.









It's interesting what what you find for example I tried 3 different sweet potato varieties with different vine habits and the short vining 'bush' type did best but who knows if just a different spacing is needed? It'll also be interesting to find out how the harvest goes. Commercially the vines are stripped & a plow is run down a row of sweet potatoes to lift them, with peanut mixed in there will be complications at harvest. You can see in the adjacent bed i tried other combinations with papaya, yuca/cassava, and several other crops.

So, short word is that this sort of work could be a lifetime experience good thing you are young!
29
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: seeds available
« Last post by achetadomestica on Today at 08:05:31 AM »
update
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