Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 193520 times)

FreshOne

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 20
    • N. San Diego CA, 10A
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1075 on: June 13, 2018, 11:09:20 PM »
If you are trying to be all "organic", use seaweed in all your waterings and sprays.  This will provide some Copper and Zinc, etc.  Some kinds of rock dusts would also help.  Some chelated products and some complexed products are also labeled for use in organic production.

I don't see any indication of Mango Bacterial Black Spot (MBBS). 
[Bacterial black spots on other plants are usually other species of bacteria, which tend to be host specific, so we should not leave off the word "mango" in the name.]

I've foliage fed with southern ag citric micro-nutrients and sul-mag-po to the soil cause that's what i have. not all 'organic' at all.

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3335
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1076 on: June 14, 2018, 07:58:57 AM »

I've foliage fed with southern ag citric micro-nutrients and sul-mag-po to the soil cause that's what i have. not all 'organic' at all.

You're like me, you use the best approach keeping your personal health in mind and not taking risks.  I have had no luck with Southern Ag foliar treatments.  I have with Keyplex 350DP.  That is some miracle stuff especially with chlorosis prone material like Flying Dragon citrus rootstock which has a terrible time uptaking or processing micros.

BTW, if you're not adding a surfactant to your sprays, you're wasting your time.

Jose Spain

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 206
    • Marbella, Spain. Zone 11a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1077 on: June 14, 2018, 04:27:21 PM »
BTW, if you're not adding a surfactant to your sprays, you're wasting your time.

Mark, you mean any product or just some of them? For example, we must add surfactant to seaweed or phytohormones too?
Jose

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3335
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1078 on: June 15, 2018, 08:14:13 AM »
BTW, if you're not adding a surfactant to your sprays, you're wasting your time.

Mark, you mean any product or just some of them? For example, we must add surfactant to seaweed or phytohormones too?

No, only sprays - herbicides, pesticides.  It's a spreader-sticker and the product becomes rainfast.  I use NIS aka non-ionic surfactant.

Jose Spain

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 206
    • Marbella, Spain. Zone 11a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1079 on: June 16, 2018, 03:09:23 AM »
Got it, thank you mate. ;)
Jose

Capt Ram

  • 33461
  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 149
    • Lake Worth, Fl
    • View Profile
    • Sailing-charters.org
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1080 on: July 12, 2018, 08:47:58 PM »
I've got 2 Keitt trees with a bad case of MBBS
Just about all the fruit is split and diease ..
If I severely prune it back , taking all leaves off would this help? Or will the MBBS come back?
If I top work the tree, would this also be infected?
Www.sailing-charters.org

Cookie Monster

  • Broward, FL Zone 10b
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4244
  • Eye like mangoes
    • Tamarac, FL, 33321, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1081 on: July 12, 2018, 09:48:44 PM »
I severely pruned mine, and it came back :-(. Now my other keitt has it too. You should be able to top work, as the disease is not systemic as far as I know.

I've got 2 Keitt trees with a bad case of MBBS
Just about all the fruit is split and diease ..
If I severely prune it back , taking all leaves off would this help? Or will the MBBS come back?
If I top work the tree, would this also be infected?
Jeff  :-)

Paquicuba

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 84
    • United States, FL, Weston, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1082 on: July 12, 2018, 11:35:44 PM »
Can someone please shed a light on what's going on with this little Pickering Tree? It looks healthy until you see that part of the bark is gone —everything is dry, no gummosis or something of that nature. Have you experienced the same issue? should I keep it or get rid of it now that it's just a little over 2' tall?

Thanks for your input!!





Cookie Monster

  • Broward, FL Zone 10b
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4244
  • Eye like mangoes
    • Tamarac, FL, 33321, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1083 on: July 13, 2018, 10:49:57 AM »
Could be sunburn or chafing injury. I would leave it and let it heal.

Can someone please shed a light on what's going on with this little Pickering Tree? It looks healthy until you see that part of the bark is gone —everything is dry, no gummosis or something of that nature. Have you experienced the same issue? should I keep it or get rid of it now that it's just a little over 2' tall?

Thanks for your input!!




Jeff  :-)

Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2077
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1084 on: July 13, 2018, 11:58:30 AM »
Looks as though someone did a bud graft, which then died.  I hope that wasn't the 'Pickering'--- if it was, then the rest is probably Turpentine.
Har

Paquicuba

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 84
    • United States, FL, Weston, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1085 on: July 13, 2018, 12:01:18 PM »
Thanks a lot guys!! Great comments!! Hopefully it'll heal nicely.

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8459
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1086 on: July 13, 2018, 02:06:54 PM »
Looks as though someone did a bud graft, which then died.  I hope that wasn't the 'Pickering'--- if it was, then the rest is probably Turpentine.

That damage looks to be above the graft and tbose leaves are definitely that of  Pickering.
- Rob

Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2077
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1087 on: July 14, 2018, 06:26:59 PM »
Good.
Har

Capt Ram

  • 33461
  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 149
    • Lake Worth, Fl
    • View Profile
    • Sailing-charters.org
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1088 on: July 20, 2018, 05:56:31 AM »
Thanks Jeff, if it came back on yours, I'm gonna top work the 2 trees I have..
Any. Suggestions on what trees are most resistance to MBBS?
Www.sailing-charters.org

Capt Ram

  • 33461
  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 149
    • Lake Worth, Fl
    • View Profile
    • Sailing-charters.org
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1089 on: July 20, 2018, 05:56:39 AM »
Thanks Jeff, if it came back on yours, I'm gonna top work the 2 trees I have..
Any. Suggestions on what trees are most resistance to MBBS?
Www.sailing-charters.org

behlgarden

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1945
    • CA, Zone 10 B
    • View Profile
    • LED Bulbs for Landscape Lighting
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1090 on: July 20, 2018, 05:01:21 PM »
I had a ground squirrel chew my young cado, stone fruit, and mango branches, in one instance, it chewed my grafted mango right above the graft, it was pushing and then it stalled. I was pissed and wanted to yank it. it had less than 1/3rd branch left and it was 1/4" thick to begin with. In 3 weeks I see it pushing hard again and the wound is fattening and healing.

may be it will work out, not sure in the long run if that tree would be strong enough.

FruitSal

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • U.S., Central Florida, zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1091 on: September 10, 2018, 12:35:17 PM »
Hello all,

First, thank you for your very helpful posts. I have quietly consulted this forum for advice for years. I have two young (no harvest yet) mango trees: a Pickering that is growing vigorously and beautifully, and a Cogshall that looks terrible. Please help me diagnose my Cogshall's problem; is it bacterial black spot? How do I treat it?

I appreciate any thoughts on the matter!








Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2077
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1092 on: September 10, 2018, 09:44:22 PM »
Mango Decline:  root difficulties and resulting multiple deficiencies, and then susceptibility to any pest or disease that comes along, such as thrips, powdery mildew, and anthracnose.  [I don't think I see any Mango Bacterial Black Spot on it.]

This is commonly caused by excess of compost, burying the tree too deep, or planting in potting soil that decomposes, settles, and becomes mucky.
Har

pineislander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 834
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1093 on: September 11, 2018, 08:02:40 AM »
Hello all,

First, thank you for your very helpful posts. I have quietly consulted this forum for advice for years. I have two young (no harvest yet) mango trees: a Pickering that is growing vigorously and beautifully, and a Cogshall that looks terrible. Please help me diagnose my Cogshall's problem; is it bacterial black spot? How do I treat it?

I appreciate any thoughts on the matter!

Interesting is that many of your leaves look similar to a tree I was dealing with this time last year. As you can see just one micronutrient and fish emulsion spray and gypsum on soil cleared up the problem and this year the tree is very happy.

http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=1001.msg312557;topicseen#msg312557

Orkine

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 281
    • Jupiter, FL, USA
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1094 on: September 22, 2018, 06:24:05 PM »
I dont know what I need to do to fix this.

These are grafts on a recently top-worked tree.
The grafts took but the growth is anemic at best.  The leaves are tiny and even when there has been a second flush it sits right on the first making it look more like a rose than a mango (see fourth and fifth picture).

Should I feed this plant Nitrogen, it needs to grow.
I have or can get fertilizer with minors if that is what this baby needs.




This is my most recent graft on the same stump and the first flush here look more normal.  The blue dots are from a recent spray of copper.



In case it is relevant, I don't irrigate or fertilize my lawn - which comes right up next to the tree.  I use a mulching mower to the grass clipping return to the soil.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2018, 06:32:11 PM by Orkine »

Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2077
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1095 on: September 24, 2018, 08:02:21 AM »
I always recommend fertilizing recently top-work-grafted mangos with a full-mix fertilizer (i.e., Nitrogen-containing fertilizer with all the other nutrients too, and Calcium, if the soil isn't lime laden).
Har

Cookie Monster

  • Broward, FL Zone 10b
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4244
  • Eye like mangoes
    • Tamarac, FL, 33321, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1096 on: September 24, 2018, 11:26:18 AM »
I no longer do complete cutback for top-working. Instead, I'll lop off 1/3 to 1/2 of the tree then graft the resulting sprouts. The rest gets top-worked in the following years. This leaves the tree with foliage and allows it to continue to photosynthesize.
Jeff  :-)

Carbo

  • Brown Thumb in 10b, SE Florida
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 265
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1097 on: September 29, 2018, 12:04:55 PM »
Will someone ID this pest, please?  Whatever this is, my Cogshall is being hit pretty hard with it.  A Pickering, about 10 feet away, has none of this.
Also, with the frequent posts about rodent control, I wanted to intro Rio.  A feral/stray cat who showed up in my backyard one day.  My other cat, Gio, took a liking to him and the rest is history.  He likes to hang out in the yard.  His hunting skills are without equal.  Mice, rats, snakes, lizards, and squirrels have all been victimized by this guy.  Very effective, organic, works cheap. 




Orkine

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 281
    • Jupiter, FL, USA
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1098 on: September 29, 2018, 01:50:18 PM »
I no longer do complete cutback for top-working. Instead, I'll lop off 1/3 to 1/2 of the tree then graft the resulting sprouts. The rest gets top-worked in the following years. This leaves the tree with foliage and allows it to continue to photosynthesize.
That is how I am doing the next two topworks.
I took the first third of my starter tree (a Tommy A that I got from Home Depot more than 13 years ago) and a second tree from the same period is now 1/3 whatever it used to be, with a number of varieties grafted on for a 4 of 5 in one tree in the future.  Grafts on these trees grow very nicely.

pineislander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 834
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1099 on: September 29, 2018, 07:51:26 PM »
Will someone ID this pest, please?  Whatever this is, my Cogshall is being hit pretty hard with it.  A Pickering, about 10 feet away, has none of this.
Also, with the frequent posts about rodent control, I wanted to intro Rio.  A feral/stray cat who showed up in my backyard one day.  My other cat, Gio, took a liking to him and the rest is history.  He likes to hang out in the yard.  His hunting skills are without equal.  Mice, rats, snakes, lizards, and squirrels have all been victimized by this guy.  Very effective, organic, works cheap. 



Could be spiderweb or Fall Webworm. Inspect inside web for moth larvae.
https://www.hgtv.com/outdoors/gardens/planting-and-maintenance/fall-webworms

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers