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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 175427 times)

Mr. Clean

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #50 on: May 02, 2012, 01:31:34 AM »
May be a dumb question, but is there any benefit ( or downside) to planting while its raining a lot?

The upside is you won't have to irrigate as much during the rainy season to get your new trees established.   This may save you time.  :)  The downside is that by not irrigating as often, you won't see your trees as often and be able to provide updates on the forum as often.   ;)
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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #51 on: May 02, 2012, 04:57:11 AM »
May be a dumb question, but is there any benefit ( or downside) to planting while its raining a lot?

Big benefit with most fruit trees, as they don't even notice they're being transplanted: no transplant shock. But mangos are so hardy, roots not so sensitive, and drought tolerant, that this doesn't seem to apply to them. Transplanting in cloudy or rainy weather is big plus with almost everything else.
Oscar

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #52 on: May 02, 2012, 10:02:12 AM »
My thought was with a lot of rain, the fertilizer will get washed down much more quickly. I was wondering if it really mattered.

One benefit, for me anyway, is that I love to garden while its raining-it keeps me cool...

Pancrazio

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #53 on: May 06, 2012, 05:20:49 PM »
As some of you may know, i have had two flowering flushes on my mango. The first one reached its peak during the end of march, while my mango was still covered by my removable structure. Some flowers of this early bloom died in febrauary, before actually bloom, and the plant grew another flush of flower that is blooming right now.

However, during march, i discovered that the flowers formed in january weren't healty at all. First i discovered what now looks like a mango malformation disease on a panicle (and even if i still hope that it was just a retarded effect of the cold, i have little hope left), panicle wich i removed as soon as i realized (or suspected) what was going on. Not much later, one of the panicles seemed to get a little black spot, that increase in size in the following days. Since there weren't fruits set on this panicle, i also removed it.
Now, the bad news is that pruning the panicle hasn't stopped the black disease/necrosis. This is what i have now on the twig:



What do you think i should do? The black disease is slowly but steadly spreading. As you can see the plant has already been sprayed with sulphur/copper (i have sprayed it during all the winter because i feared fungal attacks)
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FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #54 on: May 06, 2012, 05:24:01 PM »
I think if you cut they wood back to a healthy part of the branch, it will be fine...and also if u leave it alone, it should be fine.

It looks like a mango that wanted to bloom, but got hit by cold...or maybe bloomed, and spikes fell, and got hit by cold..

Hope it pulls through! I'm sure it will leaf out nicely soon!
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Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #55 on: May 06, 2012, 10:11:20 PM »
It may be a bacterial infection inside the tender wood.  I recommend cutting off the affected part, cutting a couple of inches below the bottom edge of the rot.  If there is any dark stain inside the wood where you cut it, sanitize the clippers with alcohol or pinesol or chlorox, then cut another inch or two off.  Then spray or drench with a systemic bactericide / fungicide.  Copper and sulfur work mainly on the surface.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #56 on: May 06, 2012, 10:25:25 PM »
It may be a bacterial infection inside the tender wood.  I recommend cutting off the affected part, cutting a couple of inches below the bottom edge of the rot.  If there is any dark stain inside the wood where you cut it, sanitize the clippers with alcohol or pinesol or chlorox, then cut another inch or two off.  Then spray or drench with a systemic bactericide / fungicide.  Copper and sulfur work mainly on the surface.

on second thought, I think it's best to take guanabanus's advice on this one!

better safe than sorry!
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Pancrazio

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #57 on: May 07, 2012, 07:14:20 PM »
Thank you guys. I have done as told. I used alcool on scissors and on the twig just before cutting. But i havent any systemic fungicide at hand right now.
Let's hope it will stop spreading. Im pretty sure it comes from the pretty rainy spring we are having here. A bless after the very dry winter, but a serius problem for the tropical plants that need sun and heat after having spent last 6 months in a cold dark environment.
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mangomandan

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #58 on: May 08, 2012, 01:28:42 PM »
So far every Rosigold mango I've picked has shown significant (disgusting) stem-end rot as it ripens.

Does anyone know of a post-harvest treatment of the fruit that would be practical for a  home grower to try?

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #59 on: May 10, 2012, 08:20:21 PM »
Any thoughts:







- Rob

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #60 on: May 10, 2012, 11:22:44 PM »
Any thoughts:







Looks like you recently sprayed the leaves? Is it copper sulfate? Looks like leaf burn from the spray. You don't have any sucking insect on the leaves?
Oscar

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #61 on: May 11, 2012, 12:27:34 AM »
Did you look at those leaves with a magnifier?  It might be damage from thrips.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #62 on: May 11, 2012, 12:32:40 AM »
Ya,
looks like this is a member of the blue man-go group,

or Somebody beat this plant with the copper stick.


Any thoughts:





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Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #63 on: May 11, 2012, 12:37:21 AM »
More likely it is bacterial leaf spot.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #64 on: May 11, 2012, 12:40:17 AM »
I think Oscar has it. Looks like phytotoxicity due to copper. The copper was either too strong and/or was applied with zinc sulphate.

Any thoughts:







Looks like you recently sprayed the leaves? Is it copper sulfate? Looks like leaf burn from the spray. You don't have any sucking insect on the leaves?
Jeff  :-)

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #65 on: May 11, 2012, 06:54:12 AM »
From the "blu-evidence" I would agree it was recently copperized however I just received this plant and did not perform the application.  In all fairness, I won't say where it came from other than not Zills or Excalibur).

This damage is only on the leaves on the top portion of the plant (it is about 3+ feet tall in a 3 gallon).  The leaves on the lower portion do not have this damage.

I will break out the magnifying glass and check for thrips.  Assuming its not, anything to do but let it grow thru the dose of copper?
- Rob

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #66 on: May 11, 2012, 08:10:16 AM »
Looks suspicious for spider mites to me...

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #67 on: May 11, 2012, 08:20:04 AM »
Thrips is easy to spray for (thrips-damaged leaves are usually worse off than yours);  the bacterial leaf spot is not so easy.  I did an elaborate controlled experiment at Zill's, using half-a-dozen or more treatments, none of which worked.  That was in the mid-1990's.  I assume someone has come up with something by now.

After I remembered to open up your pictures to full size, I noticed that some of the spots have distinct boundaries along secondary or terciary veins.  This is not characteristic of spray damage or of insect damage or of fungal infections, but it is typical of bacterial leaf spot.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #68 on: May 11, 2012, 09:33:00 AM »
What are the best avenues to tackle this problem.  If its a bacterial thing and spraying will not help, since it is a small tree and the lower portion is not affected, should I cut it back?
- Rob

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #69 on: May 11, 2012, 11:28:40 AM »
Ohh OK. I thought that bacterial blackspot was a bit darker and penetrated through to the top side of the leaf but trust your judgement.

After I remembered to open up your pictures to full size, I noticed that some of the spots have distinct boundaries along secondary or terciary veins.  This is not characteristic of spray damage or of insect damage or of fungal infections, but it is typical of bacterial leaf spot.
Jeff  :-)

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #70 on: May 11, 2012, 11:31:02 AM »
Does not look like bacterial black spot (which would call for copper treatments) but of course I could be wrong.

Should I not prune and spray (and copper fungicide, from Southern Ag) or prune below the damaged area and spray as normal ?
- Rob

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #71 on: May 11, 2012, 01:16:06 PM »
What variety of mango is the one that has this?

I get this on my Kent and Irwin mostly and sometimes on my Keitt. Most other mangoes seem to be free of this problem.

Not all copper products work on this infestation. You must make sure that it says for use on bacterial spot. I would think that a systemic type fungicide would be a better product.
Its a Frances Hargrave (according to Fairchild, parentage is a Haden seedling).
- Rob

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #72 on: May 11, 2012, 01:21:25 PM »
OK I know where it's from :-).

What variety of mango is the one that has this?

I get this on my Kent and Irwin mostly and sometimes on my Keitt. Most other mangoes seem to be free of this problem.

Not all copper products work on this infestation. You must make sure that it says for use on bacterial spot. I would think that a systemic type fungicide would be a better product.
Its a Frances Hargrave (according to Fairchild, parentage is a Haden seedling).
Jeff  :-)

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #73 on: May 11, 2012, 02:56:28 PM »
What variety of mango is the one that has this?

I get this on my Kent and Irwin mostly and sometimes on my Keitt. Most other mangoes seem to be free of this problem.

Not all copper products work on this infestation. You must make sure that it says for use on bacterial spot. I would think that a systemic type fungicide would be a better http://m.tsn.ca/ product.

Its a Frances Hargrave (according to Fairchild, parentage is a Haden seedling).



There you have it: A. highly susceptible - MA 162, MA 165, MA 152 (Kent), MA 151 (Keitt), MA 150 (Irwin), and MA 146 (Haden);

I just checked my Kent, and Irwin mangoes and they both have it on the older leaves. None of my other mangoes have it. When I first saw it I did an alternating soil drench using Cleary 3336F, and Dithane M-45, and also sprayed the tree from top to bottom including the underside of leaves. Both these fungicides are broad spectrum systemic types. This will stop it from spreading but it will not remove it from the older leaves. In other words it will kill the bacteria but it will not remove the damage that it caused on the older leaves. But since you don't see it happening on the new leaves you know it did the job.

The ratios to use to combat rust and bacterial spot are as follows for planted trees. If growing in a pot, pour the mix slowly until runoff at the bottom occurs then stop and save any leftover mix for the next time or apply to another plant. Notice that the ratios are different depending on the type of fungicide used.

-Cleary 3336f

Soil drench: 1 tsp to 1 gallon of water.
Foliage spray: 1 tsp to 1 gallon of water.

-Dithane M-45

Soil drench: 2 Tbls to 1 gallon of water.
Foliage spray: 2 Tbls to 1 gallon of water.

Apply only one type of fungicide per treatment cycle. Reapply after 10-14 days but this time use the second fungicide. After the 10-14 day period has lapsed now go back to the previous fungicide again. Repeat this cycle until you have used each fungicide two times or applied this treatment four times.

Should I otherwise continue care as normal with fertilizer, etc.?
- Rob

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #74 on: May 11, 2012, 11:34:10 PM »
Enduser,
Thank you for the info on copper oxychloride.  I have never used that.
Har

 

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