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Author Topic: Red lime?  (Read 1225 times)

gnappi

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Red lime?
« on: May 17, 2018, 12:03:15 PM »
At a local garden shop I saw a small bush labeled red lime. I never heard of it and google had different descriptions from rind color green. yellow pink and red with fruit color from orange pink and red.

Are there that many or are descriptions due to various stages of ripeness?
Regards,

   Gary

Marcin

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Re: Red lime?
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2018, 03:56:21 PM »
Rangpurs are sometimes called red limes. Their fruit is actually orange like a mandarin, and sour. There's also a Rangpur hybrid called Excalibur red lime. It is said to be a local Florida variety.
http://www.citrusvariety.ucr.edu/citrus/excalibur.html
Another citrus that is called red lime is the Australian blood lime. These fruits can really turn red. The plant is very characteristic in that it has small leaves and big thorns.

gnappi

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Re: Red lime?
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2018, 08:46:39 PM »
I picked it up because the label said it was a small tree and it had no thorns. It's blooming and I like a bit of citrus in my water so I figured what the heck. I will report back once its fruit character is known.
Regards,

   Gary

brian

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Re: Red lime?
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2018, 01:51:43 PM »
I have both rangpur and Excalibur red lime (thanks to Lorewren).  Rangpur isn't very good.  It has a unique spicy taste but I don't like it much.  The Excalibur red lime appears to be a cross between the rangpur and some kind of kumquat.  The rind is sweet and edible, dark orange, and when left on the tree for a while he whole fruit becomes quite sweet.  I eat them out of hand.  There is a slight but distinct spicy "rangpur" taste.

Millet

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brian

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Re: Red lime?
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2018, 06:51:36 PM »
Millet, that is the lime I'm referring to as excalibur red lime.  I wasn't able to find it anywhere when I was looking a year or two ago.   Thanks for finding a source, others may be interested.  I am hoping to graft a few copies of mine.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2018, 09:55:44 PM by Millet »

gnappi

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Re: Red lime?
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2018, 10:58:33 PM »
Millet, that is the lime I'm referring to as excalibur red lime.  I wasn't able to find it anywhere when I was looking a year or two ago.   Thanks for finding a source, others may be interested.  I am hoping to graft a few copies of mine.

I still do not know what I have but the whole thing is weird. I'm reading from the Amazon ad that the  Citrus x aurantiifolia (This rare find is thought to be a cross between Rangpur and a kumquat) cannot be sold in Florida... ???  Isn't the Excalibur (according to Richard Wilson of Excalibur Nursery, it is a cross between kumquat and Rangpur) the same thing? These U.S.D.A folks and rules States impose on plants are confusing.

At any rate, at only $12 each I'm going to buy a few more to hedge my bets I will have one should one or more die.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2018, 11:00:17 PM by gnappi »
Regards,

   Gary

brian

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Re: Red lime?
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2018, 09:07:29 AM »
Sounds like that is excalibur.   

To tell the difference between rangpur and excalibur red lime, the excalibur leaves are more pointed and thin like other kumquat trees, while the rangpur has more round like a lime or mandarin leaf.

bsbullie

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Re: Red lime?
« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2018, 11:20:35 AM »
Post a picture,  Gary.

As many internet postings, that UCR info is false (in terns if how it explains the origin and connection with Richard and Excalibur...not even sure anyone knows for sure its true parentage).  The Red Lime was not, and I repeat was NOT, created by Richard Wilson and/or Excalibur (Excalibur does not propagate citrus...remember folks, onky certified growers can propagate citrus in Florida).  Excalibur, at one point, was the only retail location selling the Red Lime and people cane to Richard to try and purchase it.  Now, the Red Lime is propagated by Nelsons and Record Buck and delivered to big box stores in and out of the State of Florida.
- Rob

gnappi

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Re: Red lime?
« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2018, 11:43:10 AM »
Thanks Rob. The leaves are a bit over 3 inches long, dark green, shiny, pointed and not aromatic if crushed like a  lime. It has a bushy growth habit. PS I bought them at Orchard supply in Boynton beach.









« Last Edit: May 21, 2018, 12:07:28 PM by gnappi »
Regards,

   Gary

Galka

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Re: Red lime?
« Reply #10 on: May 21, 2018, 12:07:48 PM »

bsbullie

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Re: Red lime?
« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2018, 12:13:43 PM »
That is the Red Lime, like the one that caused the "Excalibur" response above.

In terms if taste, it is best described as a cross with a Tahitian lime and  Centennial Kumquat.  It is bigger than a key lime and smaller than a Tahitian Line.  Flesh is vivid orange, with some seeds and extremely juicy.  Taste is of a fruity almost orangey lime.  Not as sour/bitter as a Tahitian Line.  Best thing about it, there is no pith and the skin is 100% edible and on the noticable sweet side.  It is truly everbearing and precocious.

If you like eating fruits that are a tad tart, you can cut a Red Lime in wedges and eat right out of hand, skin and all (like the Centennial Kumquat).
- Rob

gnappi

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Re: Red lime?
« Reply #12 on: May 21, 2018, 12:57:18 PM »
Thank you Rob I had hoped that was the one that Brian described. In general I do not like citrus as a home plant but these were so intriguing and inexpensive I couldn't resist.

More to come after my blooms mature into ripe fruit.
Regards,

   Gary

gnappi

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Re: Red lime?
« Reply #13 on: May 23, 2018, 09:24:43 AM »
Another Q for Rob... mine do not have any graft marks so I assume these are propagated from the odd seeds found in them, air layering or rooting cuttings?
Regards,

   Gary

bsbullie

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Re: Red lime?
« Reply #14 on: May 24, 2018, 12:10:46 AM »
Another Q for Rob... mine do not have any graft marks so I assume these are propagated from the odd seeds found in them, air layering or rooting cuttings?

If they are bush form, which they appear to be, I have seen Record Buck's bush forms be grafted, with a real low graft, and others from cuttings.  They are not from seed.
- Rob

gnappi

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Re: Red lime?
« Reply #15 on: May 30, 2018, 05:38:29 PM »
Even with all of this rain and the fact that I transplanted them into larger pots (one while it just started flowering) the fruits are holding on and they are pea sized. The other started flowering yesterday, keeping my fingers crossed that they stay on the tree.
Regards,

   Gary

 

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