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Author Topic: Myrica rubra  (Read 26951 times)

nullzero

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #50 on: March 05, 2012, 04:24:34 PM »
I have a white trash bag over them, lets hope it works.. Not expecting much but if I have a survivor I will be very happy.

You probably know this...but just in case...plastic bag should have some vents or holes at the bottom, you don't want the plant to sweat to death and with no CO2 available either.
Oscar

I have one 3/4 inch diameter hole on the top.
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nullzero

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #51 on: March 13, 2012, 03:32:22 PM »
The two trees are dead  :'(, however great news  ;D. Apparently the last order was cuttings or seedlings of Myrica rubra varieties, not grafted which was communicated to the nursery. Also the tree quality on arrival was subpar. After a resolution and talking with the members of the group order and the nursery, the owner has agreed to send replacement trees!

I may have to drive down to San Diego this weekend and pick up the trees. Will update with pictures, hopefully I have more to show this time around :).
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lycheeluva

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #52 on: March 13, 2012, 03:42:06 PM »
how come the replacement trees will already be here this weekend after taking 3 months or so for the first order to come through.
also you ordered rafted trees and he sent you cuttings? WTF

nullzero

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #53 on: March 13, 2012, 04:29:54 PM »
how come the replacement trees will already be here this weekend after taking 3 months or so for the first order to come through.
also you ordered rafted trees and he sent you cuttings? WTF

Think the 3 months was the paperwork, wire transfer accounts, etc. There must of been a communication issue.... Its been about 2 weeks, so it makes sense to take that long to go through a process of a new order. For the nursery to make good on replacement trees shows that they are looking to make good on the transaction. I will update when I get more news or the trees in.
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TropicalFruitHunters

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #54 on: March 13, 2012, 08:37:31 PM »
Sorry to hear about your plants.  That's rough.  I hope the second shipment turns out to be a better experience for everyone.  Maybe you can convince the dude spearheading this to have a talk with Customs/USDA prior to arrival to hopefully avoid another terrible delay???  Good luck and let us know as soon as you hear anything!

nullzero

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #55 on: March 21, 2012, 02:27:41 PM »
Pick up the new Myrica rubra (grafted replacement) trees today, this time I am getting off work early and heading down to insure the plants survival. Will update with pictures, hopefully I have more to show this time around. Will pick up (1) Dongkui and (1) Ding'ao tree. USDA delayed the pickup by 3 days or so again (figures, at least the weather has been the cool mild side).
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BMc

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #56 on: March 21, 2012, 06:23:20 PM »
What varieties did they offer?
Did anyone mangae to snare a BiQi?
Did you get any male trees?

Felipe

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #57 on: March 21, 2012, 07:46:59 PM »
Good luck with your new plants Nullzy! Remember Jay`s wise words concerning the handling of bare rooted plants ;)

nullzero

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #58 on: March 22, 2012, 03:02:18 AM »
The plants (Green leaves this time!);



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TropicalFruitHunters

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #59 on: March 22, 2012, 06:53:37 AM »
Very nice!  Did you pot those up or were they already done when you picked them up?  I hope by now those plants are being subjected to lots of humidity!  Good luck.  I hope like hell all your plants do well.

So what's the story this time with the USDA?  I can understand a delay of several hours while random plants were being inspected or something like that.  Three days?  From my own experience to others that are close to me...I have a long list of adjectives I could use to describe.

Keep us up to date on the progress of your plants.

Jsvand5

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #60 on: March 22, 2012, 10:14:55 AM »
They look pretty good. Nice sized plants too. These are both grafted this time right?

nullzero

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #61 on: March 22, 2012, 12:34:31 PM »
Both trees are grafted (can see the graft union), one is a Dongkui and the other is Ding'ao. Dongkui produces some male flowers, so both will produce fruit near each other. Dongkui produces ping pong ball sized fruits, where as Ding'ao is a little smaller. Both are rated as excellent fruit quality. Both trees are potted up in 1 gal containers (can control the soil moisture levels better, its a slightly snug fit for the roots but some space to grow), they were bareroot when I received them. Using a organic potting soil mix from OSH (didnt want to spend the time to create a mix, wanted to plant ASAP).

Cold hardiness is good, it has been reported that the tree receives little to no damage from 28 degrees. You can refer to this document to learn more about the varieties and Myrica rubra;
https://rirdc.infoservices.com.au/downloads/05-174.pdf

As for the USDA inspects, its to be expected... they are over vigorous for inspections in CA, because of the massive agriculture industry.

Trees are being left outside in shaded area, location is 3-4 blocks from the ocean. Humidity levels outside are averaging 70-100% day and night. Temps averaging between 50-65 degrees rest of the week. Fog/Marine layer does not seem to be burning off the next few days, rain forecast in a few days. Not worried about evapotranspiration without a humidity dome.

http://www.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/findweather/hdfForecast?query=hermosa+beach%2C+ca
« Last Edit: March 22, 2012, 12:48:14 PM by nullzero »
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lycheeluva

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #62 on: March 22, 2012, 12:55:55 PM »
null, congrats on getting the trees.  please alert me if you hear of a second order. thanks

Jsvand5

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #63 on: March 22, 2012, 12:59:54 PM »
Me too, Wouldnt mind getting a couple of these.

nullzero

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #64 on: March 22, 2012, 01:13:47 PM »
Will update if a second order occurs, a couple people wanting to order from the forums now. If the second order does occur, we can work out the details.
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simon_grow

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #65 on: March 22, 2012, 01:26:28 PM »
Please let me know too.  I would love to pick up some of those Giant/Seedless Lychees.  Thanks in advance!
Simon

murahilin

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #66 on: March 23, 2012, 09:25:06 AM »
Please let me know too.  I would love to pick up some of those Giant/Seedless Lychees.  Thanks in advance!
Simon

A two year USDA Post Entry Quarantine is required for lychees.

nullzero

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #67 on: March 23, 2012, 07:37:48 PM »
Some better day time pictures of the two Myrica rubra trees. What to expect from the shipping from China;

Ding'ao


Ding'ao + Dongkui
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emegar

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #68 on: April 23, 2012, 02:17:48 PM »
Stephen,

Do you have an update for us?  How are your two Myrica rubras doing?  Any signs of growth yet?  Have you heard anything more about a second order?  Do you mind my asking how much they set you back?  Thanks for posting the photos of your trees.

James
James

nullzero

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #69 on: April 23, 2012, 02:25:12 PM »
Stephen,

Do you have an update for us?  How are your two Myrica rubras doing?  Any signs of growth yet?  Have you heard anything more about a second order?  Do you mind my asking how much they set you back?  Thanks for posting the photos of your trees.

James

No sign of new growth, I am getting a little worried. All the green leaves fell off a few weeks back, I still have green on 2 of the plants. However one of the plants looks like it is on the decline, the other is not looking too well as well. I am afraid if they don't sprout new growth it may not end favorably. Should of tried to baby them indoors or give them to someone with a greenhouse. I had a plastic enclosure with a plastic trash bag, but that did not seem to help so I took it off. Just hoping for the best now, after everything.
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Rtreid

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #70 on: April 23, 2012, 11:26:35 PM »
Null,

These are my plants from the  M. rubra order.




When I got them, I combined the method I have always used for bare root roses and fruit trees with Ohiojay's techniques. 


When I got the plants home I soaked them overnight in a bucket of water with very dilute Miracle Gro (1 teaspoon in 5 gallons) then potted them up and put them in a mini-greenhouse (2ft x 4 ft x 5 ft high) on seedling heating mats.  This kept the roots warm and the humidity at 95 - 100%.  I kept 4 of the plants in there for about 4 weeks (I just took them out this weekend) and the one that has just started to bud out is still in there. 


So far they are all looking good, keep me appraised on the status of yours.


Richard

TropicalFruitHunters

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #71 on: April 24, 2012, 07:59:37 AM »
Great job Richard!  I'd keep them in the little greenhouse until they flushed new growth.  The only thing that popped out for me was that you soaked them overnight?  Obviously it worked for you but that length of time seems extreme.  Anybody have some science behind this.  No Adam...jaboticaba habits are the exception!!   ;D

Null...my only suggestion is to get the plants as much humidity as you can and leave them there.  If they are declining, that's hard to reverse.  Hopefully they will turn around for you.

Thanks for posting the pics guys.

TriangleJohn

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #72 on: April 24, 2012, 10:40:48 AM »
My one survivor of the Japan order is doing well with a new flush of growth. My only problem with it is that the new branches are very weak and floppy so I have to rig up all sorts of supports for them. The rootstock has re-sprouted. This time I may let it grow some so that I can determine what they grafted these guys onto.

The one 3 year old seedling that I had planted in the ground died even though our winter was more like a long fall with few frosty nights. The seed came from Taiwan (high elevation) so I guess my zone 7b yard is too cold.

I am not going to attempt to grow these in the ground until someone offers proven hardy varieties. I'll just treat my lone survivor like the vast collection of potted citrus.

nullzero

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #73 on: April 24, 2012, 12:24:35 PM »
I took a quick picture before leaving for work this morning of the stem of the better tree...



Not looking good, I tried a humidity dome made out of a white trash bag outside. It did not seem to work well so I took it off. Anyway I am hoping for the best.
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Rtreid

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #74 on: April 24, 2012, 01:06:20 PM »
Ohiojay,

I have taken your advice and put them back in the greenhouse for a while.  Since this is my first experience with tropical bare root plants I am kind of flying blind with these.

As far as the soaking procedure, I was taught the technique many years ago by a very experienced nurseryman as a method for planting bare-root temperate fruits and roses.  I do not know if he had any science behind it, but the logic was the same as yours.  The plants have experienced quite a shock from being pulled from the ground and losing all their roots.  Even when packed in moist material, the whole packing/transport/unpacking process leaves them quite desiccated and stressed.  So he said that to help them to get rehydrated, soak them for at least 4 hours (6-8 hours being optimum with overnight fine) but not more than 24 hours before planting.  He also recommended adding a very small amount of fish emulsion (I was out of this at the time) or soluble fertilizer to the water.

Now this is for plants destined to be planted directly outside, but since I have never lost a bare root plant before, it seems to help and I figured that it could not hurt with these.

Just to clarify, I was soaking the root zone, not the whole plant.

I was wondering if the root zone heating helped.  That was just the default set up since this is where I sprout my seeds, but once again I figured it could not hurt.

« Last Edit: April 24, 2012, 01:11:02 PM by Rtreid »

 

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