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Tropical Fruit => Tropical Fruit Discussion => Topic started by: murahilin on April 14, 2012, 10:27:07 AM

Title: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on April 14, 2012, 10:27:07 AM
The goal of this post is for everyone who has a mango pest, disease, or nutritional problem to post the picture here and for it to be diagnosed and be a future reference for others. Please only include your own pics and not pics pulled from the web.

I'll start, I noticed what appears to be eggs on my coconut cream mango tree. Can anyone tell what type of eggs so I know whether to get rid of them?

(http://s13.postimage.org/e3itjvpo3/photo_3.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/e3itjvpo3/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropicalgrower89 on April 14, 2012, 12:18:33 PM
I'm not sure what type of eggs they are, but I would get a napkin and wipe them off.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on April 14, 2012, 09:19:13 PM
I say a heavy dose of malathion, or Sevin mixed with some neem oil or horticultural oil to make sure it suffocates and kill those intruders. While you are at it give that poor tree some copper to get rid of all that anthracnose. I'm done playing Mr. nice guy with pests on my fruit trees.

I think that's over kill. I rather not spray my trees with too many strong pesticides. Since I don't know what type of eggs they are I don't plan on getting rid of them. I try not to spray copper that often either.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on April 16, 2012, 04:01:31 PM
I say a heavy dose of malathion, or Sevin mixed with some neem oil or horticultural oil to make sure it suffocates and kill those intruders. While you are at it give that poor tree some copper to get rid of all that anthracnose. I'm done playing Mr. nice guy with pests on my fruit trees.

Enduser's advice sounds good to me.  Perhaps start off with a pesticide, if that doesn't kill the critters, try something stronger.  The copper makes sense since your tree has anthracnose. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on April 16, 2012, 06:35:34 PM
Enduser's advice sounds good to me.  Perhaps start off with a pesticide, if that doesn't kill the critters, try something stronger.  The copper makes sense since your tree has anthracnose.

Why would I want to kill something I haven't yet identified? Even after identifying it, why would be first choice be to use a pesticide? Why not let the other bugs handle it. Mango trees are pretty good at taking care of themselves. I don't think I have ever had to spray a pesticide on any mango tree I've planted in the ground.

The reason the copper doesn't make sense to me is that over use of copper can be damaging to the environment and unless my tree is flowering and I am possibly going to lose a large amount of fruit I see no need to spray copper on my tree.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on April 16, 2012, 07:42:51 PM
Enduser's advice sounds good to me.  Perhaps start off with a pesticide, if that doesn't kill the critters, try something stronger.  The copper makes sense since your tree has anthracnose.

Why would I want to kill something I haven't yet identified? Even after identifying it, why would be first choice be to use a pesticide? Why not let the other bugs handle it. Mango trees are pretty good at taking care of themselves. I don't think I have ever had to spray a pesticide on any mango tree I've planted in the ground.

The reason the copper doesn't make sense to me is that over use of copper can be damaging to the environment and unless my tree is flowering and I am possibly going to lose a large amount of fruit I see no need to spray copper on my tree.
I agree with you on no heavy dose of pesticide for your tree.  Like you said, better to first find out what they are as it doesn't seem to be causing any damage at the moment.

As for copper, if you are having major anthracnose issues or some other invasive fungal issues I would attack with a strong regime of copper.  Otherwise, once a month or even once every other month should more than suffice.  if you had fruit to "protect", that would be different.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fruitlovers on April 16, 2012, 08:18:27 PM
I agree that it's not wise to spray even before you know what you are spraying for. If you can't ID the eggs just keep close eye on them till start hatching. As for anthracnose i think that the tree can be weakened if it has anthracnose, so it would be good to spray copper on it. You can greatly minimize any soil damage caused by copper foliar spray by just using a tarp under the tree that catches anything that drips to the ground.


Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on April 16, 2012, 11:45:58 PM
Oscar and Rob, I agree about copper for Anthracnose but luckily this tree is not really showing any visible signs. The tree as a whole looks really good so I see no need to spray it. I may hit it with one or two copper sprays during the summer(with a tarp underneath to collect any copper runoff of course).
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on April 17, 2012, 01:31:31 AM
DELETED
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fruitlovers on April 17, 2012, 02:36:07 AM
I think those may be weevil eggs.  See these links.

[url]http://www.scienceboard.net/community/perspectives.239.html[/url] ([url]http://www.scienceboard.net/community/perspectives.239.html[/url])

[url]http://blog.redweevil.com/album-pics/22/[/url] ([url]http://blog.redweevil.com/album-pics/22/[/url])

I don't know why you want to wait and see what hatches before treating it.  From the picture, it looks like several of the eggs hatched.


Palm weevil eggs on mangos? I didn't think mangos are a host plant for palm weevil?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on April 17, 2012, 07:23:08 AM
I think those may be weevil eggs.  See these links.

[url]http://www.scienceboard.net/community/perspectives.239.html[/url] ([url]http://www.scienceboard.net/community/perspectives.239.html[/url])

[url]http://blog.redweevil.com/album-pics/22/[/url] ([url]http://blog.redweevil.com/album-pics/22/[/url])

I don't know why you want to wait and see what hatches before treating it.  From the picture, it looks like several of the eggs hatched.


Palm weevil eggs on mangos? I didn't think mangos are a host plant for palm weevil?

Agreed, plus, that Science Advisory Board does not even list the U.S. as a country affected.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: happyisland on April 17, 2012, 08:06:56 AM
I agree that it's not wise to spray even before you know what you are spraying for. If you can't ID the eggs just keep close eye on them till start hatching. As for anthracnose i think that the tree can be weakened if it has anthracnose, so it would be good to spray copper on it. You can greatly minimize any soil damage caused by copper foliar spray by just using a tarp under the tree that catches anything that drips to the ground.

In everyone's experience, what are the negative effects of spraying copper?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on April 17, 2012, 08:35:50 AM
Palm weevil eggs on mangos? I didn't think mangos are a host plant for palm weevil?


Florida has an infestation of Sri Lanka Weevils; I can't find pictures of their eggs on the internet. http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/UsefulLawnandGardenResources/SriLankaWeevilupdate2008.pdf (http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/UsefulLawnandGardenResources/SriLankaWeevilupdate2008.pdf)

However, I was able to find pictures of another weevil's eggs.  The picture of the eggs look similar to weevil.  The description of the eggs is:  "Eggs:  The eggs are creamy white in color, long and oval in shape. The average size of an egg is 2.6 mm long and 1.1 mm wide." 

Hope noone from Florida mailed anything to Hawaii...the penalties are severe:  http://hawaii.gov/hdoa/pi/pq/penalty (http://hawaii.gov/hdoa/pi/pq/penalty)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on April 17, 2012, 08:49:31 AM
Florida has an infestation of Sri Lanka Weevils; I can't find pictures of their eggs on the internet. [url]http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/UsefulLawnandGardenResources/SriLankaWeevilupdate2008.pdf[/url] ([url]http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/UsefulLawnandGardenResources/SriLankaWeevilupdate2008.pdf[/url])

However, I was able to find pictures of another weevil's eggs.  The picture of the eggs look similar to weevil.  The description of the eggs is:  "Eggs:  The eggs are creamy white in color, long and oval in shape. The average size of an egg is 2.6 mm long and 1.1 mm wide." 

Hope noone from Florida mailed anything to Hawaii...the penalties are severe:  [url]http://hawaii.gov/hdoa/pi/pq/penalty[/url] ([url]http://hawaii.gov/hdoa/pi/pq/penalty[/url])


If you googled Sri Lanka Weevil egg, the first result would show you a picture of the egg: http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/mannion/pdfs/SriLankaWeevil.pdf (http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/mannion/pdfs/SriLankaWeevil.pdf)

It also explains that the egg is laid in the soil.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on April 17, 2012, 08:51:18 AM
In everyone's experience, what are the negative effects of spraying copper?


This post has some info on it: http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=273 (http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=273)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropicalgrower89 on April 17, 2012, 11:10:52 AM
I think those may be weevil eggs.  See these links.

[url]http://www.scienceboard.net/community/perspectives.239.html[/url] ([url]http://www.scienceboard.net/community/perspectives.239.html[/url])

[url]http://blog.redweevil.com/album-pics/22/[/url] ([url]http://blog.redweevil.com/album-pics/22/[/url])

I don't know why you want to wait and see what hatches before treating it.  From the picture, it looks like several of the eggs hatched.


I think Mr. Clean is right. I saw some weevil couples on top of each other... So it's the special time of year.  ;D They were on my ndm #4 so I crushed those horny mofos... lol    Trying to spread your population and eat up my trees? I don't think so....  :P
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: SWRancher on April 17, 2012, 11:38:47 AM
I think those may be weevil eggs.  See these links.

[url]http://www.scienceboard.net/community/perspectives.239.html[/url] ([url]http://www.scienceboard.net/community/perspectives.239.html[/url])

[url]http://blog.redweevil.com/album-pics/22/[/url] ([url]http://blog.redweevil.com/album-pics/22/[/url])

I don't know why you want to wait and see what hatches before treating it.  From the picture, it looks like several of the eggs hatched.


I think Mr. Clean is right. I saw some weevil couples on top of each other... So it's the special time of year.  ;D They were on my ndm #4 so I crushed those horny mofos... lol    Trying to spread your population and eat up my trees? I don't think so....  :P




Very well stated.  ;D
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: adiel on April 17, 2012, 03:40:03 PM
Lizard Eggs ;)  But seriously have you checked the big mango book?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Fruitzilla on April 17, 2012, 06:29:58 PM
I am not sure what eggs those are from, but agree to let nature take its course first.  A balanced garden is a healthy garden.

Regarding the Anthracnose; my mango's had (note past tense  ;D) severe anthracnose because they were uncared for as this property sat empty for four years before I purchased it.  I used a new earthfriendly product from Organic Labs http://www.organiclabs.com/Retail.html  (http://www.organiclabs.com/Retail.html) called Plant Doctor and the Anthracnose cleared up completely!
You can get it at Home Depot .. I also got their Fruit Maker as a folier spray of Potassium.  It was developed at Texas A&M as a form of Potassium that uptakes significantly more than granular. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on April 17, 2012, 06:37:58 PM
I noticed some Anthracnose on my mangoes and sprayed them with copper.  How long does it take for the Anthracnose to clear up?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on April 17, 2012, 08:10:58 PM
Lizard Eggs ;)  But seriously have you checked the big mango book?
Good idea. I will check it later.

Honestly, I don't really care what they are as you can probably tell from my anti spraying attitude. I would probably leave them along regardless. I just posted so others would post stuff to get the thread going so it could be a good reference.


Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tim on April 17, 2012, 08:23:54 PM
Been a bit neglected huh? ;D
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fruitlovers on April 18, 2012, 01:59:19 AM
I think those may be weevil eggs.  See these links.

[url]http://www.scienceboard.net/community/perspectives.239.html[/url] ([url]http://www.scienceboard.net/community/perspectives.239.html[/url])

[url]http://blog.redweevil.com/album-pics/22/[/url] ([url]http://blog.redweevil.com/album-pics/22/[/url])

I don't know why you want to wait and see what hatches before treating it.  From the picture, it looks like several of the eggs hatched.


Palm weevil eggs on mangos? I didn't think mangos are a host plant for palm weevil?

Agreed, plus, that Science Advisory Board does not even list the U.S. as a country affected.


This nasty red palm weevil has already been found in Orange County, California:
http://cisr.ucr.edu/red_palm_weevil.html (http://cisr.ucr.edu/red_palm_weevil.html)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 23, 2012, 08:39:43 PM
One thing to keep in mind here -- copper will not clear up (ie, remove) existing anthracnose damage on leaves / fruit. It will simply prevent anthracnose infection on uninfected leaves / fruit.

I noticed some Anthracnose on my mangoes and sprayed them with copper.  How long does it take for the Anthracnose to clear up?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Fruitzilla on April 24, 2012, 03:18:00 PM
The website states that you can get it at HD, but HD only carries a different product then the one shown on the vendor website. The HD version is a combo product that is not shown in the vendor website.

Do you have a HD sku number for the Organocide™ Plant Doctor?


The sku is on this http://www.organiclabs.com/Images/LabelImages/Plant%20Doctor%20Back%20Label%20Booklet%20Instructions%20for%20Use.pdf (http://www.organiclabs.com/Images/LabelImages/Plant%20Doctor%20Back%20Label%20Booklet%20Instructions%20for%20Use.pdf)
It is at the Home Depot in Jupiter and you can also find it online at Ebay. 
It clears up Anthracnose faster and better than anything I have ever used. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Greg1029 on April 24, 2012, 07:06:12 PM
I am not sure what eggs those are from, but agree to let nature take its course first.  A balanced garden is a healthy garden.

Regarding the Anthracnose; my mango's had (note past tense  ;D) severe anthracnose because they were uncared for as this property sat empty for four years before I purchased it.  I used a new earthfriendly product from Organic Labs [url]http://www.organiclabs.com/Retail.html[/url]  ([url]http://www.organiclabs.com/Retail.html[/url]) called Plant Doctor and the Anthracnose cleared up completely!
You can get it at Home Depot .. I also got their Fruit Maker as a folier spray of Potassium.  It was developed at Texas A&M as a form of Potassium that uptakes significantly more than granular. 

FYI, this is Agri-Fos and you can find it everywhere.  Also, it's not totally organic like they lead you to believe but supposed to be a very effective Fungicide (and fertilizer).  I started using it as a foiler spray when I noticed fungal problems on my mangos. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: puglvr1 on April 24, 2012, 07:32:23 PM
Enduser...the HD SKU # for the Plant Doctor is #659-548 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: demingcr on April 25, 2012, 06:15:16 PM
Hello everyone.

First and foremost sorry for making my first post a question, I've been "lurking" for a bit and stealing all your wonderful opinions and ideas while planting a tropical garden :P. I know its bad forum/internet etiquette.

I live in Cape Coral, or Lee County in SWFL. I've been purchasing and planting over the past few months in an attempt to both have tons of fresh fruit for my family, but also trying to get rid of my 'lawn' (such as FL lawns are without chemicals and regular watering... weed plantations that is). I purchased a "Glenn" variety mango in a 7 gallon from a local nursery here (Top Tropicals retail center, if that matters) and planted it in my back yard. That was around 3 months ago. Since then, it's flowered and set fruit, one is rather large and two are starting to grow. I've noticed that it is getting a concerning amount of browning at the tips of its leaves that my other Mango trees do not seem to exhibit, but otherwise seems like a healthy tree. I'm looking for advice on what it could be and any possible solutions, my initial thoughts are wind burn and/or salt burn due to having to hand water frequently due to our winter drought, and the abnormally windy days we've been having (this past weekend for instance with its 20 mph+ winds).

I have attached 4 pictures, the first 2 are a Nam Doc Mai variety I bought about 1 month after the Glenn. It was a 15 gallon from a different nursery (fruitscapes on pine island in north lee county) and it seems extremely happy with no leaf burn.. some of the leaves are tattered but that was from the truck ride home tearing the leaves a bit. The NDM pictures are for comparison to the Glenn. The NDM is planted in my front yard, where the soil is much sandier. Both locations receive around the same light.
The next 2 pictures are the Glenn, while it is flushing and holding onto three fruit, the leaves shown concern me.

NDM
(http://s16.postimage.org/cvoxw9cip/NDM.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/cvoxw9cip/)
NDM pic #2
(http://s17.postimage.org/hymcl3kmz/NDM2.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/hymcl3kmz/)
Top of the Glenn / new flushes and fruit
(http://s17.postimage.org/5zaudsf23/GLENN2.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/5zaudsf23/)
Example of the browned leaves
(http://s17.postimage.org/h05zit7az/GLENN.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/h05zit7az/)

Thanks for the look at the thread!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 25, 2012, 07:41:03 PM
My take would be minor salt / fert burn. Overall the tree looks quite healthy though.

Hopefully Har will chime in with some wisdom.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on April 25, 2012, 11:19:03 PM
My take would be minor salt / fert burn. Overall the tree looks quite healthy though.

Hopefully Har will chime in with some wisdom.
From what I can see, I am leaning toward Jeff's diagnosis.  While it is common in Florida to see mangoes with brown leaf tips, it also appears to minor burn due to excess fert or mineral burn.  Without knowing more as to your care and conditions, the cause (soil, salt, fert, etc.) would be difficult.  How close to the Gulf are you ?  Do you fertilize the tree, if so, with what and how much and how often ?  Have you applied any other nutritional supplements or soil amendments ?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: demingcr on April 26, 2012, 12:07:59 AM
I'm not far from water, around a mile,  but it is a large river brackish river that feeds into the Gulf called the Caloosahatchee. From the gulf itself I am probably at least 10 miles. However, Cape Coral is known for its massive amounts of water ways and canals that branch off from the river and I'm about 1000 or less feet from one of those. When I planted it i mixed black kow composted manure with the soil at about a 50-50 ratio. The black kow compost was rated as .5/.5/.5, but i'm not sure if fertilizer was added to the compost or not.. it's the typical bag you see in the home improvement stores. The soil was sandy but more compact than what I have out front which seems like loose packed sand, I could take a picture of it if that would help. I fertilized it with a 6-4-6 "citrus / avocado / mango" fert from one of the home improvement stores, I don't quite remember the brand name but it was similar to the Vigo brand (or was Vigo). I fertilized by sprinkling over the top at about 1/2 (or less) the recommended strength for the trunk width as the lady I bought the plant from said it was already fertilized and wouldn't have to fertilize for a month or two, which was the period of time i waited. That was about 1 month ago. From the time i bought it till now it's rained maybe twice, one of which was this past weekend, so I've been hand watering from city tap 2 to 3 times a week.

The only other 'event' between planting and now is that it got a bit cold and windy for 3-4 days in February  (45+ degrees, though) for 3 to 4 days, and it just did the same weather pattern again this past weekend, although it was preceded by about 3 inches of rain.


My take would be minor salt / fert burn. Overall the tree looks quite healthy though.

Hopefully Har will chime in with some wisdom.
From what I can see, I am leaning toward Jeff's diagnosis.  While it is common in Florida to see mangoes with brown leaf tips, it also appears to minor burn due to excess fert or mineral burn.  Without knowing more as to your care and conditions, the cause (soil, salt, fert, etc.) would be difficult.  How close to the Gulf are you ?  Do you fertilize the tree, if so, with what and how much and how often ?  Have you applied any other nutritional supplements or soil amendments ?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Greg1029 on April 27, 2012, 03:39:30 AM
Enduser...the HD SKU # for the Plant Doctor is #659-548

Thanks pug, unfortunately this item is not available in my area.
Enduser,  Maybe you missed my previous post, Agri-Fos is the same thing (EPA 71962-1).  You should have no problem finding it.

Greg
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: puglvr1 on April 27, 2012, 10:05:57 AM
 

[/quote] from Greg1029
FYI, this is Agri-Fos and you can find it everywhere.  Also, it's not totally organic like they lead you to believe but supposed to be a very effective Fungicide (and fertilizer).  I started using it as a foiler spray when I noticed fungal problems on my mangos. 
[/quote]


Hi Greg, I think you're right...

The down side with getting Agri Fos at least for me is the added shipping cost (which I hate paying) but I know sometimes its unavoidable if that's the only way to get it. The large qt. size at HD for Plant Doctor is $17.29 and the cheapest I found online for Agri-fos is $22 with free shipping but its a Pint (16 oz.)I've never  seen agri-fos anywhere around locally sold.

Enduser...since you live in Tampa maybe you can check at a Hydrophonics store and see "if" they have it or can order it for you? Unfortunately, I live in a very small town and don't have one in my area...

Nancy

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on April 30, 2012, 06:07:42 PM
This is a Lemon Zest which was planted 4 or 5 months ago- it was dormant all winter-there is some growth just pushing out- the leaves don't look very healthy- I have watered this-nothing else. None of the other mango tree have this.


(http://s7.postimage.org/9injosvnb/P1040597.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/9injosvnb/)

(http://s7.postimage.org/irppyx4jb/P1040598.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/irppyx4jb/)

(http://s7.postimage.org/cff62tquv/P1040599.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/cff62tquv/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 30, 2012, 06:13:57 PM
Looks like cold wind burn. Either the other trees were slightly more protected, or the LZ happens to be more sensitive.

You planted your best tasting mango near the street, where the mango thieves will strip it bare!

This is a Lemon Zest which was planted 4 or 5 months ago- it was dormant all winter-there is some growth just pushing out- the leaves don't look very healthy- I have watered this-nothing else. None of the other mango tree have this.


([url]http://s7.postimage.org/9injosvnb/P1040597.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/9injosvnb/[/url])

([url]http://s7.postimage.org/irppyx4jb/P1040598.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/irppyx4jb/[/url])

([url]http://s7.postimage.org/cff62tquv/P1040599.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/cff62tquv/[/url])
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on April 30, 2012, 06:18:16 PM
Looks like cold wind burn. Either the other trees were slightly more protected, or the LZ happens to be more sensitive.

You planted your best tasting mango near the street, where the mango thieves will strip it bare!

This is a Lemon Zest which was planted 4 or 5 months ago- it was dormant all winter-there is some growth just pushing out- the leaves don't look very healthy- I have watered this-nothing else. None of the other mango tree have this.


([url]http://s7.postimage.org/9injosvnb/P1040597.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/9injosvnb/[/url])

([url]http://s7.postimage.org/irppyx4jb/P1040598.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/irppyx4jb/[/url])

([url]http://s7.postimage.org/cff62tquv/P1040599.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/cff62tquv/[/url])



Thank You Jeff  :)

Interesting that none of the other trees have it.   Maybe the cold burn is why this tree is behind the others in growth flushes?
Do I need to do anything?

I know its close to the street-I'm attaching security cameras to it.  The HOA will be the first to debow my mangos, I'm sure...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: zands on April 30, 2012, 06:42:39 PM
Are you fertilizing it? Here are the standard Zill directions http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6015/5905298900_05f84f80ee_b.jpg (http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6015/5905298900_05f84f80ee_b.jpg) I tuck the fertilizer under the mulch and try to mix it in a bit with the soil there....by hand. 8-3-9 from Excalibur will do the trick





Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on April 30, 2012, 06:49:35 PM
Are you fertilizing it? Here are the standard Zill directions [url]http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6015/5905298900_05f84f80ee_b.jpg[/url] ([url]http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6015/5905298900_05f84f80ee_b.jpg[/url]) I tuck the fertilizer under the mulch and try to mix it in a bit with the soil there....by hand. 8-3-9 from Excalibur will do the trick


I have been guilty of over-fertilization so I was waiting . I'm planning on doing it this coming weekend.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 30, 2012, 06:49:49 PM
Cold wind burn is hit and miss. For example, my lancetilla got it but not the PSM right beside it. I'd leave it alone, unless Har or one of the other forum wizards thinks that it's something different.

The LZ appears to be a vigorous / upright grower, so it will no doubt catch up with your other trees :-).

Thank You Jeff  :)

Interesting that none of the other trees have it.   Maybe the cold burn is why this tree is behind the others in growth flushes?
Do I need to do anything?

I know its close to the street-I'm attaching security cameras to it.  The HOA will be the first to debow my mangos, I'm sure...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on April 30, 2012, 06:53:45 PM
Cold wind burn is hit and miss. For example, my lancetilla got it but not the PSM right beside it. I'd leave it alone, unless Har or one of the other forum wizards thinks that it's something different.

The LZ appears to be a vigorous / upright grower, so it will no doubt catch up with your other trees :-).

Thank You Jeff  :)

Interesting that none of the other trees have it.   Maybe the cold burn is why this tree is behind the others in growth flushes?
Do I need to do anything?

I know its close to the street-I'm attaching security cameras to it.  The HOA will be the first to debow my mangos, I'm sure...

Thanks for the advice :)

I was planning to fertilize this weekend-should I hold off on this tree, because of the damaged leaves? 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 30, 2012, 07:03:12 PM
If it was me, I'd go ahead and give it some fert.

Thanks for the advice :)

I was planning to fertilize this weekend-should I hold off on this tree, because of the damaged leaves?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: zands on April 30, 2012, 07:14:12 PM


I have been guilty of over-fertilization so I was waiting . I'm planning on doing it this coming weekend.


I have not burned any young mangoes or citrus while fertilizing at the Zill rates. Plus we are talking about high quality NPK fertilizer with minor elements. These type fertilizers always have a coated time release nitrogen. So harder for the nitrogen to burn anything.... it can be done but you have to make an effort. I once burned a nice ornamental vine with cheap 10-10-10 fertilizer. The nitrogen in that just goes into action, not a time release nitrogen. For kicks I feed bananas that cheap 10-10-10 or 6-6-6. Papayas would also probably benefit. No minor elements in them. Just N and P and K.

Also it is much easier to burn a plant in a pot than one in the ground.......The vine I burned was in a pot

You can also spray your mangoes with Southern Ag citrus foliar found at Home Depot. This really gets the minor elements into your young trees. Even better is Keyplex foliar but I have never used it.

This dewd dude Patrick has a really good fertilization plan http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/tropicalfruits/msg1222445314042.html?38 (http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/tropicalfruits/msg1222445314042.html?38)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 30, 2012, 07:45:05 PM
hehe that's Patrick. He apparently has awesome soil like mrs Nat. Jealousy detected.

This dude has a really good fertilization plan [url]http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/tropicalfruits/msg1222445314042.html?38[/url] ([url]http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/tropicalfruits/msg1222445314042.html?38[/url])
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on April 30, 2012, 07:51:23 PM
hehe that's Patrick. He apparently has awesome soil like mrs Nat. Jealousy detected.

This dude has a really good fertilization plan [url]http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/tropicalfruits/msg1222445314042.html?38[/url] ([url]http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/tropicalfruits/msg1222445314042.html?38[/url])


Yeah he mixes some concoction in his caldron that his plants love...I have heard they can be seen glowing at night  ;) ;D :o
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: pj1881 (Patrick) on April 30, 2012, 08:07:04 PM
Thats funny, the first thing I thought of when I started reading this post was (hmmmm... Time for 10lbs 8-3-9, 2:1 SoAg Foliar (1gal), 1lb Sequestrene 138fe, and a bag of Epsom salts for good measure! Just kidding of course..

I do tend to get a little out of control with the nutrition, if only I would apply it to myself and not just my plants..

As for a glow, I have noticed some of the smaller neighborhood animals with strange growths!

Fact is I do have sandy soil, the only rock I have found in my yard in the first five feet is small pieces of concrete from the original construction back in the early 50's, most of the nutrition goes right through the soil to the water table.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on April 30, 2012, 08:27:03 PM
Those mixes are a bit too complicated for me-although Patrick's plants are beautiful

I have some Excalibur Fertilizer...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: pj1881 (Patrick) on May 01, 2012, 03:27:31 PM
Thanks Nat! Actually, the Rare Fruit Council "Fruitilizer" that Excalibur sells is my primary fertilizer..
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 01, 2012, 09:43:22 PM
Lots of good advice already given.  I go with minor salt burns also. 

[Potassium deficiency usually shows more extensive marginal burning up the sides of leaves, not just the tips.]

In case you didn't catch it from the link Zands provided showing the planting directions on the back side of a Zill name tag,

freshly planted MANGOS DO NOT LIKE BLACK COW!  And big ones don't need it.  Mangos like sand.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on May 01, 2012, 10:55:23 PM
May be a dumb question, but is there any benefit ( or downside) to planting while its raining a lot? 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on May 02, 2012, 12:40:20 AM
May be a dumb question, but is there any benefit ( or downside) to planting while its raining a lot?
you get wet   ;D
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on May 02, 2012, 01:31:34 AM
May be a dumb question, but is there any benefit ( or downside) to planting while its raining a lot?

The upside is you won't have to irrigate as much during the rainy season to get your new trees established.   This may save you time.  :)  The downside is that by not irrigating as often, you won't see your trees as often and be able to provide updates on the forum as often.   ;)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fruitlovers on May 02, 2012, 04:57:11 AM
May be a dumb question, but is there any benefit ( or downside) to planting while its raining a lot?

Big benefit with most fruit trees, as they don't even notice they're being transplanted: no transplant shock. But mangos are so hardy, roots not so sensitive, and drought tolerant, that this doesn't seem to apply to them. Transplanting in cloudy or rainy weather is big plus with almost everything else.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on May 02, 2012, 10:02:12 AM
My thought was with a lot of rain, the fertilizer will get washed down much more quickly. I was wondering if it really mattered.

One benefit, for me anyway, is that I love to garden while its raining-it keeps me cool...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Pancrazio on May 06, 2012, 05:20:49 PM
As some of you may know, i have had two flowering flushes on my mango. The first one reached its peak during the end of march, while my mango was still covered by my removable structure. Some flowers of this early bloom died in febrauary, before actually bloom, and the plant grew another flush of flower that is blooming right now.

However, during march, i discovered that the flowers formed in january weren't healty at all. First i discovered what now looks like a mango malformation disease on a panicle (and even if i still hope that it was just a retarded effect of the cold, i have little hope left), panicle wich i removed as soon as i realized (or suspected) what was going on. Not much later, one of the panicles seemed to get a little black spot, that increase in size in the following days. Since there weren't fruits set on this panicle, i also removed it.
Now, the bad news is that pruning the panicle hasn't stopped the black disease/necrosis. This is what i have now on the twig:

(http://i.imgur.com/Zb1II.jpg?1)

What do you think i should do? The black disease is slowly but steadly spreading. As you can see the plant has already been sprayed with sulphur/copper (i have sprayed it during all the winter because i feared fungal attacks)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on May 06, 2012, 05:24:01 PM
I think if you cut they wood back to a healthy part of the branch, it will be fine...and also if u leave it alone, it should be fine.

It looks like a mango that wanted to bloom, but got hit by cold...or maybe bloomed, and spikes fell, and got hit by cold..

Hope it pulls through! I'm sure it will leaf out nicely soon!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 06, 2012, 10:11:20 PM
It may be a bacterial infection inside the tender wood.  I recommend cutting off the affected part, cutting a couple of inches below the bottom edge of the rot.  If there is any dark stain inside the wood where you cut it, sanitize the clippers with alcohol or pinesol or chlorox, then cut another inch or two off.  Then spray or drench with a systemic bactericide / fungicide.  Copper and sulfur work mainly on the surface.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on May 06, 2012, 10:25:25 PM
It may be a bacterial infection inside the tender wood.  I recommend cutting off the affected part, cutting a couple of inches below the bottom edge of the rot.  If there is any dark stain inside the wood where you cut it, sanitize the clippers with alcohol or pinesol or chlorox, then cut another inch or two off.  Then spray or drench with a systemic bactericide / fungicide.  Copper and sulfur work mainly on the surface.

on second thought, I think it's best to take guanabanus's advice on this one!

better safe than sorry!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Pancrazio on May 07, 2012, 07:14:20 PM
Thank you guys. I have done as told. I used alcool on scissors and on the twig just before cutting. But i havent any systemic fungicide at hand right now.
Let's hope it will stop spreading. Im pretty sure it comes from the pretty rainy spring we are having here. A bless after the very dry winter, but a serius problem for the tropical plants that need sun and heat after having spent last 6 months in a cold dark environment.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomandan on May 08, 2012, 01:28:42 PM
So far every Rosigold mango I've picked has shown significant (disgusting) stem-end rot as it ripens.

Does anyone know of a post-harvest treatment of the fruit that would be practical for a  home grower to try?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on May 10, 2012, 08:20:21 PM
Any thoughts:


(http://s14.postimage.org/he5j6hrwt/Plants_5_10_12_005.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/he5j6hrwt/)

(http://s7.postimage.org/611qgqvyf/Plants_5_10_12_006.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/611qgqvyf/)


Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fruitlovers on May 10, 2012, 11:22:44 PM
Any thoughts:


([url]http://s14.postimage.org/he5j6hrwt/Plants_5_10_12_005.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/he5j6hrwt/[/url])

([url]http://s7.postimage.org/611qgqvyf/Plants_5_10_12_006.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/611qgqvyf/[/url])


Looks like you recently sprayed the leaves? Is it copper sulfate? Looks like leaf burn from the spray. You don't have any sucking insect on the leaves?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 11, 2012, 12:27:34 AM
Did you look at those leaves with a magnifier?  It might be damage from thrips.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on May 11, 2012, 12:32:40 AM
Ya,
looks like this is a member of the blue man-go group,

or Somebody beat this plant with the copper stick.


Any thoughts:


([url]http://s14.postimage.org/he5j6hrwt/Plants_5_10_12_005.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/he5j6hrwt/[/url])

([url]http://s7.postimage.org/611qgqvyf/Plants_5_10_12_006.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/611qgqvyf/[/url])
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 11, 2012, 12:37:21 AM
More likely it is bacterial leaf spot.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on May 11, 2012, 12:40:17 AM
I think Oscar has it. Looks like phytotoxicity due to copper. The copper was either too strong and/or was applied with zinc sulphate.

Any thoughts:


([url]http://s14.postimage.org/he5j6hrwt/Plants_5_10_12_005.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/he5j6hrwt/[/url])

([url]http://s7.postimage.org/611qgqvyf/Plants_5_10_12_006.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/611qgqvyf/[/url])


Looks like you recently sprayed the leaves? Is it copper sulfate? Looks like leaf burn from the spray. You don't have any sucking insect on the leaves?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on May 11, 2012, 06:54:12 AM
From the "blu-evidence" I would agree it was recently copperized however I just received this plant and did not perform the application.  In all fairness, I won't say where it came from other than not Zills or Excalibur).

This damage is only on the leaves on the top portion of the plant (it is about 3+ feet tall in a 3 gallon).  The leaves on the lower portion do not have this damage.

I will break out the magnifying glass and check for thrips.  Assuming its not, anything to do but let it grow thru the dose of copper?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: ShowmeyourKeitts on May 11, 2012, 08:10:16 AM
Looks suspicious for spider mites to me...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 11, 2012, 08:20:04 AM
Thrips is easy to spray for (thrips-damaged leaves are usually worse off than yours);  the bacterial leaf spot is not so easy.  I did an elaborate controlled experiment at Zill's, using half-a-dozen or more treatments, none of which worked.  That was in the mid-1990's.  I assume someone has come up with something by now.

After I remembered to open up your pictures to full size, I noticed that some of the spots have distinct boundaries along secondary or terciary veins.  This is not characteristic of spray damage or of insect damage or of fungal infections, but it is typical of bacterial leaf spot.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on May 11, 2012, 09:33:00 AM
What are the best avenues to tackle this problem.  If its a bacterial thing and spraying will not help, since it is a small tree and the lower portion is not affected, should I cut it back?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on May 11, 2012, 11:28:40 AM
Ohh OK. I thought that bacterial blackspot was a bit darker and penetrated through to the top side of the leaf but trust your judgement.

After I remembered to open up your pictures to full size, I noticed that some of the spots have distinct boundaries along secondary or terciary veins.  This is not characteristic of spray damage or of insect damage or of fungal infections, but it is typical of bacterial leaf spot.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on May 11, 2012, 11:31:02 AM
Does not look like bacterial black spot (which would call for copper treatments) but of course I could be wrong.

Should I not prune and spray (and copper fungicide, from Southern Ag) or prune below the damaged area and spray as normal ?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on May 11, 2012, 01:16:06 PM
What variety of mango is the one that has this?

I get this on my Kent and Irwin mostly and sometimes on my Keitt. Most other mangoes seem to be free of this problem.

Not all copper products work on this infestation. You must make sure that it says for use on bacterial spot. I would think that a systemic type fungicide would be a better product.
Its a Frances Hargrave (according to Fairchild, parentage is a Haden seedling).
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on May 11, 2012, 01:21:25 PM
OK I know where it's from :-).

What variety of mango is the one that has this?

I get this on my Kent and Irwin mostly and sometimes on my Keitt. Most other mangoes seem to be free of this problem.

Not all copper products work on this infestation. You must make sure that it says for use on bacterial spot. I would think that a systemic type fungicide would be a better product.
Its a Frances Hargrave (according to Fairchild, parentage is a Haden seedling).
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on May 11, 2012, 02:56:28 PM
What variety of mango is the one that has this?

I get this on my Kent and Irwin mostly and sometimes on my Keitt. Most other mangoes seem to be free of this problem.

Not all copper products work on this infestation. You must make sure that it says for use on bacterial spot. I would think that a systemic type fungicide would be a better [url]http://m.tsn.ca/[/url] ([url]http://m.tsn.ca/[/url]) product.

Its a Frances Hargrave (according to Fairchild, parentage is a Haden seedling).



There you have it: A. highly susceptible - MA 162, MA 165, MA 152 (Kent), MA 151 (Keitt), MA 150 (Irwin), and MA 146 (Haden);

I just checked my Kent, and Irwin mangoes and they both have it on the older leaves. None of my other mangoes have it. When I first saw it I did an alternating soil drench using Cleary 3336F, and Dithane M-45, and also sprayed the tree from top to bottom including the underside of leaves. Both these fungicides are broad spectrum systemic types. This will stop it from spreading but it will not remove it from the older leaves. In other words it will kill the bacteria but it will not remove the damage that it caused on the older leaves. But since you don't see it happening on the new leaves you know it did the job.

The ratios to use to combat rust and bacterial spot are as follows for planted trees. If growing in a pot, pour the mix slowly until runoff at the bottom occurs then stop and save any leftover mix for the next time or apply to another plant. Notice that the ratios are different depending on the type of fungicide used.

-Cleary 3336f

Soil drench: 1 tsp to 1 gallon of water.
Foliage spray: 1 tsp to 1 gallon of water.

-Dithane M-45

Soil drench: 2 Tbls to 1 gallon of water.
Foliage spray: 2 Tbls to 1 gallon of water.

Apply only one type of fungicide per treatment cycle. Reapply after 10-14 days but this time use the second fungicide. After the 10-14 day period has lapsed now go back to the previous fungicide again. Repeat this cycle until you have used each fungicide two times or applied this treatment four times.

Should I otherwise continue care as normal with fertilizer, etc.?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 11, 2012, 11:34:10 PM
Enduser,
Thank you for the info on copper oxychloride.  I have never used that.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on May 22, 2012, 09:07:52 AM
My Harvest Moon mango has finally put out some new growth. However, it looks a bit droopy- Its not dry ( It been raining heavily here) and my soil is sandy so I doubt its too wet. What's wrong, if anything is? Does anyone have much experience with the tree?

(http://i1112.photobucket.com/albums/k495/nsobgyn/temporary-6.jpg)

(http://i1112.photobucket.com/albums/k495/nsobgyn/temporary-5.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Sleepdoc on May 22, 2012, 09:34:35 AM
My Harvest Moon mango has finally put out some new growth. However, it looks a bit droopy- Its not dry ( It been raining heavily here) and my soil is sandy so I doubt its too wet. What's wrong, if anything is? Does anyone have much experience with the tree?



Looks good to me ...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 22, 2012, 09:40:49 AM
Normal
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on May 22, 2012, 09:52:43 AM
That's good to hear- interesting how the growth looks so different compared to my other trees.- It really is droopy compared to all the others... Guess to each tree, its own.  :)

I know the variety is relatively new. Has anyone had this tree for more than one year? Is it a vigorous grower?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on May 22, 2012, 10:15:13 AM
That's good to hear- interesting how the growth looks so different compared to my other trees.- It really is droopy compared to all the others... Guess to each tree, its own.  :)

I know the variety is relatively new. Has anyone had this tree for more than one year? Is it a vigorous grower?
Yuo realize you have planted this far to close to the street...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on May 22, 2012, 10:17:18 AM
Yuo realize you have planted this far to close to the street...

Doesn't look too close to the street to me.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on May 22, 2012, 10:21:18 AM
That's good to hear- interesting how the growth looks so different compared to my other trees.- It really is droopy compared to all the others... Guess to each tree, its own.  :)

I know the variety is relatively new. Has anyone had this tree for more than one year? Is it a vigorous grower?
Yuo realize you have planted this far to close to the street...

Its about 14+ft from the street, although still in reach of the mango thieves... my husband wanted it  there...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: cbss_daviefl on May 28, 2012, 08:09:32 PM
Here is my Kent.  My uneducated guess is potasium deficiency.  Can someone please confirm?  Also note all the chunks missing from the new growth from root weevils.

(http://s16.postimage.org/4r95qzbgx/Kent_120528_Nutritional.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/4r95qzbgx/)

Here is my blotchy Dot.  PPK is similar.

(http://s13.postimage.org/eitv9muqr/Dot_120528_Nutritional.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/eitv9muqr/)

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: BestDay on June 02, 2012, 03:13:32 PM
Hi guys, I found these under the leaves of the growth flush on my NDM#4.  The new leaves are curling with these bugs under most of the upper new leaves.  Should I worry about them or will they go away when the new leaves harden up?

(http://i1145.photobucket.com/albums/o518/BestDay23/bugslg.jpg)

Thanks,
Bill
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on June 02, 2012, 05:58:38 PM
those aphis can be sprayed off with hose!!

also sucking insects cause leaf deformations!!!

good luck to u and your trango mee
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on June 02, 2012, 11:32:26 PM
It may take more than just water to remove them...before any pesticides are used I would try the soap water spray.  I would also check out your other plants/shrubs in your hard as aphids are very common and they may have originated elsewhere.  As always, you must eliminate the source/host to fix the problem outright.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on June 03, 2012, 01:17:13 PM
It may take more than just water to remove them...before any pesticides are used I would try the soap water spray.  I would also check out your other plants/shrubs in your hard as aphids are very common and they may have originated elsewhere.  As always, you must eliminate the source/host to fix the problem outright.

 I have tried soap sprays-a number of homemade concoctions ( found on Garden Web) and some commercial products-I have found that they don't work at all- that's just my experience.  What do you use? What does it work for?

Nat
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on June 03, 2012, 02:44:10 PM
It may take more than just water to remove them...before any pesticides are used I would try the soap water spray.  I would also check out your other plants/shrubs in your hard as aphids are very common and they may have originated elsewhere.  As always, you must eliminate the source/host to fix the problem outright.

 I have tried soap sprays-a number of homemade concoctions ( found on Garden Web) and some commercial products-I have found that they don't work at all- that's just my experience.  What do you use? What does it work for?

Nat
While I was just commenting on the use of water vs soap water solution, aphids can be very stubborn and potentially problematic.  While I know some are against pesticides, it could call for a sevin treatment.  For those thinking of an oil application, as we are entering summertime and the sun is strong/temps are high, be very mindful it is not a good time to apply at the risk of burn/damage to the foliage.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fruitlovers on June 03, 2012, 11:59:53 PM


 I have tried soap sprays-a number of homemade concoctions ( found on Garden Web) and some commercial products-I have found that they don't work at all- that's just my experience.  What do you use? What does it work for?

Nat

Hi Nat, you're definitely wrong about that. Soap sprays do work on aphids. Will kill them right on contact. My guess is that you did not use a strong enough concentration. You can use any dishwashing liquid soap, like Ivory, and experiment with the correct concentration. In my opinion aphids are the easiest of all pest to kill and control because they are very soft bodied. Often you have to get rid of the ants which mine them, and are the main source of the problem.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on June 04, 2012, 12:24:20 AM
Hi Nat, you're definitely wrong about that. Soap sprays do work on aphids. Will kill them right on contact. My guess is that you did not use a strong enough concentration. You can use any dishwashing liquid soap, like Ivory, and experiment with the correct concentration. In my opinion aphids are the easiest of all pest to kill and control because they are very soft bodied. Often you have to get rid of the ants which mine them, and are the main source of the problem.

Exactly! Many people don't realize they need to control the ants to control the aphids.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on June 04, 2012, 12:31:56 AM
Yes on the liquid dish soap (not liquid hand soap).

Generally the recommendations run 1 to 1.5 fluid ounces per gallon of water to kill soft-bodied insects.  If you want to kill tougher insects like hymenopterans, they say one cup per gallon (this might kill plants).
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: puglvr1 on June 04, 2012, 09:05:52 AM
Here is my Kent.  My uneducated guess is potasium deficiency.  Can someone please confirm?  Also note all the chunks missing from the new growth from root weevils.

([url]http://s16.postimage.org/4r95qzbgx/Kent_120528_Nutritional.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/4r95qzbgx/[/url])

Here is my blotchy Dot.  PPK is similar.

([url]http://s13.postimage.org/eitv9muqr/Dot_120528_Nutritional.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/eitv9muqr/[/url])


Brandon, I bet spraying your trees with something like "Citrus Nutritional Spray" by Southern Ag http://www.centralgarden.com/brands/southern-ag/southern-ag-insecticides-citrus-nutritional-spray-12ea-1pt.html (http://www.centralgarden.com/brands/southern-ag/southern-ag-insecticides-citrus-nutritional-spray-12ea-1pt.html)
I'm sure there are many different ones out there that will work as well. Just remember to spray it after sunset so the leaves have a chance to completely dry so you don't sunburn the leaves.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: cbss_daviefl on June 04, 2012, 09:49:30 AM
I have been using Fer-A-Gro, which is Magnesium 2.64%, Sulfer 2.9, Boron 0.01, Chelated Iron 1.59, Chelated Manganese 1.53, Molybdenum .001, and Chelated Zinc 0.94. 

Here is the history of what I have done with the pictured trees:

I sprayed Fer-A-Gro on 2/16, 4/23, and last night.  On 3/3 and 5/5, I applied 3 pounds of 8-3-9-3 to that tree with a 5" truck diameter.  On 4/14, I did a Seq 138 chelated iron drench, 8 tablespoons.  On 5/31, I got a PH tester and got a reading a hair below 6 so I applied 4 cups of dolomite, trying to get it to 6.5.

Anyone see something wrong with dosages or frequency or anything I am missing?

Here is my Kent.  My uneducated guess is potasium deficiency.  Can someone please confirm?  Also note all the chunks missing from the new growth from root weevils.

([url]http://s16.postimage.org/4r95qzbgx/Kent_120528_Nutritional.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/4r95qzbgx/[/url])

Here is my blotchy Dot.  PPK is similar.

([url]http://s13.postimage.org/eitv9muqr/Dot_120528_Nutritional.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/eitv9muqr/[/url])


Brandon, I bet spraying your trees with something like "Citrus Nutritional Spray" by Southern Ag [url]http://www.centralgarden.com/brands/southern-ag/southern-ag-insecticides-citrus-nutritional-spray-12ea-1pt.html[/url] ([url]http://www.centralgarden.com/brands/southern-ag/southern-ag-insecticides-citrus-nutritional-spray-12ea-1pt.html[/url])
I'm sure there are many different ones out there that will work as well. Just remember to spray it after sunset so the leaves have a chance to completely dry so you don't sunburn the leaves.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Pancrazio on June 07, 2012, 06:36:39 PM
([url]http://i.imgur.com/Zb1II.jpg?1[/url])


After i cutted it seemed to disappear, but during last days it has appeared again lower in the twig, just under the cut, and on another twig.
I sprayed with aliette and tebuconazole. We will see, but i'm somewat scared.   :-[
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on June 07, 2012, 11:57:21 PM
Alliette drench on the roots is good too.  Check label:  some products say not to spray and drench with same product in close succession, because may overdose.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on August 10, 2012, 01:02:58 AM
I was in my yard wearing a LED white headlamp and noticed that the white weevils were very visible at night.  The contrast of their white bodies, the green leaves, and the darkness really made them very visible.  So I decided to remove some weevils.  The technique that worked best for me was cupping one hand under the weevil on the leaf, then using the other hand to knock the weevil off of the leaf into my other hand.  Then immediately smoosh them.  I wore leather gloves.   My mango trees are relatively small, so this was easy to do.

I noticed several things:

The vast majority of weevils were on mango trees going thru growth flushes (for me those were Coconut Cream, Carrie, and Sunrise).  Perhaps trees going thru growth flushes taste better?
A majority of single weevils were on the underside of the leaves.
A majority of single weevils were on or near the tip of the leaves.
A majority of the time only a single weevil occupied a single leaf (like it was their territory).
A majority of single weevils were on the west side of the tree.
A majority of couple weevils (weevils fornicating) were on the northeast side of the tree.  This was only on my Sunrise.
A majority of couple weevils were closer to the middle of the leaf.

Based on this small sampling...it appears the weevils have a sort of social culture where the single weevils hang out in a certain part of the tree on the underside of tips of leaves.  Couple weevils go to a different part of the tree and occupied a middle part of the leaf.  This was a relatively small sampling, so you may not be able to draw any conclusions. 

Hope this helps in your weevil erradication or at least gets you thinking of ways to get rid of them.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: zands on August 10, 2012, 08:43:16 AM
Put a blue tarp under your tree or part of your tree. Shake some branches. Then you see how many weevils you really have. I was shocked.


----Also spraying with rubbing alcohol plus a little dish detergent.....some say this dries out these weevils and they die. Weevils have a hard shell making them immune to other tricks like insecticidal soap.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on August 10, 2012, 08:48:30 AM
I was in my yard wearing a LED white headlamp and noticed that the white weevils were very visible at night.  The contrast of their white bodies, the green leaves, and the darkness really made them very visible.  So I decided to remove some weevils.  The technique that worked best for me was cupping one hand under the weevil on the leaf, then using the other hand to knock the weevil off of the leaf into my other hand.  Then immediately smoosh them.  I wore leather gloves.   My mango trees are relatively small, so this was easy to do.

I noticed several things:

The vast majority of weevils were on mango trees going thru growth flushes (for me those were Coconut Cream, Carrie, and Sunrise).  Perhaps trees going thru growth flushes taste better?
A majority of single weevils were on the underside of the leaves.
A majority of single weevils were on or near the tip of the leaves.
A majority of the time only a single weevil occupied a single leaf (like it was their territory).
A majority of single weevils were on the west side of the tree.
A majority of couple weevils (weevils fornicating) were on the northeast side of the tree.  This was only on my Sunrise.
A majority of couple weevils were closer to the middle of the leaf.

Based on this small sampling...it appears the weevils have a sort of social culture where the single weevils hang out in a certain part of the tree on the underside of tips of leaves.  Couple weevils go to a different part of the tree and occupied a middle part of the leaf.  This was a relatively small sampling, so you may not be able to draw any conclusions. 

Hope this helps in your weevil erradication or at least gets you thinking of ways to get rid of them.
This has been highly researched/analyzed by the university of Florida *this is nothing new to the area)...Google is a wonderful thing.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomandan on August 10, 2012, 08:52:16 AM
Sir Cleanliness,  what did you notice about the flying ability of the weevils?

The ones at my house are not "weak" flyers; they're pretty good at flying.   I guess that explains why I haven't had much luck with the tanglefoot on the trunk method.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropicalgrower89 on August 10, 2012, 11:00:36 AM
The best way of destroying white weevils..


(http://s15.postimage.org/beyvannnr/flame_thrower3.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/beyvannnr/)

Even though the trees would be destroyed, so I wouldn't recommend it.  ;D  :P  ;)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on August 10, 2012, 11:19:27 AM
Sir Cleanliness,  what did you notice about the flying ability of the weevils?

The ones at my house are not "weak" flyers; they're pretty good at flying.   I guess that explains why I haven't had much luck with the tanglefoot on the trunk method.
Yes, they are very good with their wings...flying is not a problem for them.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on August 10, 2012, 11:21:33 AM
I'm aware that due to the high PH of my soil, (7.6), here in central Broward County, that the mango tree's ability to absorb iron is blocked.  Thus, my tree exhibits signs of chlorosis. 
I purchased Southern Ag's Chelated Liquid Iron.  About 10 days ago I applied it as a soil drench.  Yesterday I applied it as a foliar spray.  I haven't yet seen any improvement.  How long should it take to see an improvement in the tree?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: TnTrobbie on August 10, 2012, 12:09:15 PM
When I apply a soil drench (3Tbs/gal...6 yr old tree), I see a change in about 1-2 weeks. The Southern AG Citrus Foilar spray however, is see a change before the end of the day (very diluted chelated liq FE spray stains my leaves). How old is the tree and what volume of Chelated FE did you use per gallon on your tree.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on August 10, 2012, 12:14:09 PM
I'm aware that due to the high PH of my soil, (7.6), here in central Broward County, that the mango tree's ability to absorb iron is blocked.  Thus, my tree exhibits signs of chlorosis. 
I purchased Southern Ag's Chelated Liquid Iron.  About 10 days ago I applied it as a soil drench.  Yesterday I applied it as a foliar spray.  I haven't yet seen any improvement.  How long should it take to see an improvement in the tree?
Are you sure its iron deficiency?  Pictures would help if you can...

You might want to try IronPlex by KeyPlex.  I have had mixed results with SouthernAg products.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on August 10, 2012, 12:51:02 PM
When I apply a soil drench (3Tbs/gal...6 yr old tree), I see a change in about 1-2 weeks. The Southern AG Citrus Foilar spray however, is see a change before the end of the day (very diluted chelated liq FE spray stains my leaves). How old is the tree and what volume of Chelated FE did you use per gallon on your tree.
It's a Cogshall that went from a 3 gallon pot to the yard about 4 years ago.  Produced it's first fruits this season and is currently undergoing some serious growth flush. 
The recommended rate is 1 tablespoon/gal.  Preferring to err on the side of caution, the soil drench was at half that.  Yesterday's foliar spray was at the recommended rate, however.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on August 10, 2012, 12:52:53 PM
. . .Are you sure its iron deficiency?  Pictures would help if you can...

You might want to try IronPlex by KeyPlex.  I have had mixed results with SouthernAg products.
I believe it is an iron deficiency judging by the symptoms.  I'll try and post a pic or two later on as there is a monsoon outside right now.  :o
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on August 10, 2012, 01:07:59 PM
Some pics. . .

(http://s11.postimage.org/out3hjor3/20120810_125432.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/out3hjor3/)


(http://s9.postimage.org/vgf22k2u3/20120810_125505.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/vgf22k2u3/)


(http://s15.postimage.org/xvke75pqf/20120810_125631.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/xvke75pqf/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: TnTrobbie on August 10, 2012, 05:35:22 PM
Are those pics of recent flushes? If yes, on my tree it takes about 2-3 weeks for them to fully green out. Looks like you got some FE staining when the water dries on the leaves in the 2nd and 3rd pic.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on August 10, 2012, 07:03:51 PM
Looks like iron / manganese deficiency. It can take weeks and more than one application to fully correct.

Some pics. . .

([url]http://s11.postimage.org/out3hjor3/20120810_125432.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/out3hjor3/[/url])


([url]http://s9.postimage.org/vgf22k2u3/20120810_125505.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/vgf22k2u3/[/url])


([url]http://s15.postimage.org/xvke75pqf/20120810_125631.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/xvke75pqf/[/url])
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on August 10, 2012, 07:30:50 PM
Are those pics of recent flushes? If yes, on my tree it takes about 2-3 weeks for them to fully green out. Looks like you got some FE staining when the water dries on the leaves in the 2nd and 3rd pic.
Robbie, those spots aren't FE stains.  It's some discoloration that has appeared on many of the leaves.  I have no idea what causes them.  I've asked around and was told it's normal.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on August 10, 2012, 07:32:39 PM
Looks like iron / manganese deficiency. It can take weeks and more than one application to fully correct.
Thanks, Jeff.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 10, 2012, 11:56:45 PM
Manganese deficiency and mango bacterial leaf spot.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fruitlovers on August 11, 2012, 05:59:21 AM
The best way of destroying white weevils..


([url]http://s15.postimage.org/beyvannnr/flame_thrower3.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/beyvannnr/[/url])

Even though the trees would be destroyed, so I wouldn't recommend it.  ;D  :P  ;)


Isn't that one of the forum members starting up the barbecue at the last S. Florida gathering?   ;)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on August 11, 2012, 07:16:14 AM
Manganese deficiency and mango bacterial leaf spot.
Manganese deficiency?  Surprising to hear that. . .or shouldn't I be?  How can you tell the difference between that and iron deficiency?  I've been fertilizing with Vigoro 6-4-6 plus minors approx every 5 weeks or so this summer.
Bacterial leaf spot:  what's the cause, what's the cure?

Thank you!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on August 11, 2012, 08:44:26 AM
Manganese deficiency and mango bacterial leaf spot.
Manganese deficiency?  Surprising to hear that. . .or shouldn't I be?  How can you tell the difference between that and iron deficiency?  I've been fertilizing with Vigoro 6-4-6 plus minors approx every 5 weeks or so this summer.
Bacterial leaf spot:  what's the cause, what's the cure?

Thank you!
Your Vigror 6-4-6 has .05 percent manganese, Excalibur's 8-3-9 has .49 percent manganese.

Bacterial leaf spot -- spray with copper fungicide.  Also, be careful, "as is" it could spread to your other mangoes.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on August 11, 2012, 09:47:31 AM
Your Vigror 6-4-6 has .05 percent manganese, Excalibur's 8-3-9 has .49 percent manganese.

Bacterial leaf spot -- spray with copper fungicide.  Also, be careful, "as is" it could spread to your other mangoes.
From my understanding, Excalibur sells only 50 lb bags of their fertilizer.  Way too much for my needs.  I have only this one Cogshall.  Is there another way to add manganese to the soil?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on August 11, 2012, 10:42:07 AM
Your Vigror 6-4-6 has .05 percent manganese, Excalibur's 8-3-9 has .49 percent manganese.

Bacterial leaf spot -- spray with copper fungicide.  Also, be careful, "as is" it could spread to your other mangoes.
From my understanding, Excalibur sells only 50 lb bags of their fertilizer.  Way too much for my needs.  I have only this one Cogshall.  Is there another way to add manganese to the soil?
Correct, its a 50il bag but it can be used all any plants in your yard (ornamental hedges, palms and even turf).  Your other option is a goo minor element spray.  Do you have a supply house near you that sells KeyPlex?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on August 11, 2012, 05:23:34 PM
Southern Ag has this new product I think might be worth a try:  http://www.southernag.com/docs/labels_msds/eme.pdf (http://www.southernag.com/docs/labels_msds/eme.pdf).  It's their Essential Minor Elements in granular form.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on August 11, 2012, 07:44:20 PM
Southern Ag has this new product I think might be worth a try:  [url]http://www.southernag.com/docs/labels_msds/eme.pdf[/url] ([url]http://www.southernag.com/docs/labels_msds/eme.pdf[/url]).  It's their Essential Minor Elements in granular form.

I would go with go with liquid as long as you need to supplement...plus KeyPlex is a better product.  Not even sure if that SouthernAg product is available locally and I have never heard of anybody using it.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on August 12, 2012, 12:57:50 PM
Southern Ag has this new product I think might be worth a try:  [url]http://www.southernag.com/docs/labels_msds/eme.pdf[/url] ([url]http://www.southernag.com/docs/labels_msds/eme.pdf[/url]).  It's their Essential Minor Elements in granular form.

I would go with go with liquid as long as you need to supplement...plus KeyPlex is a better product.  Not even sure if that SouthernAg product is available locally and I have never heard of anybody using it.


Rob- what form of miconutrients does Excalibur fertilizer use? I was under the impression that it was enough

Nat
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on August 12, 2012, 03:23:30 PM
Southern Ag has this new product I think might be worth a try:  [url]http://www.southernag.com/docs/labels_msds/eme.pdf[/url] ([url]http://www.southernag.com/docs/labels_msds/eme.pdf[/url]).  It's their Essential Minor Elements in granular form.

I would go with go with liquid as long as you need to supplement...plus KeyPlex is a better product.  Not even sure if that SouthernAg product is available locally and I have never heard of anybody using it.


Rob- what form of miconutrients does Excalibur fertilizer use? I was under the impression that it was enough

Nat

depends on the needs/price/availability and the type of plant. 

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomandan on August 12, 2012, 09:13:55 PM
The best way of destroying white weevils..


([url]http://s15.postimage.org/beyvannnr/flame_thrower3.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/beyvannnr/[/url])

Even though the trees would be destroyed, so I wouldn't recommend it.  ;D  :P  ;)


Isn't that one of the forum members starting up the barbecue at the last S. Florida gathering?   ;)


I remember hearing about the dueling flame thrower barbecue.  It started with a careless remark about Lemon Zest. There was an ill-considered retort along the lines of "Maha yo Mama!"  Fruit Punches were about to be thrown when someone's significant other thought to cut open a nicely ripened Crunchy Lemon jackfruit.  In the end a good time was had by all.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 13, 2012, 11:29:27 PM
In Iron deficiency only the veins stay green.

In Manganese deficiency the veins and a narrow strip of tissue to either side of the veins stay green.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on August 14, 2012, 06:04:30 AM
In Iron deficiency only the veins stay green.

In Manganese deficiency the veins and a narrow strip of tissue to either side of the veins stay green.
Thank you.  That helps.  I have to assume, then, the tree has manganese deficiency, which explains why the iron treatments have made no difference in the tree's appearance.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on August 14, 2012, 09:09:28 AM
Southern Ag has this new product I think might be worth a try:  [url]http://www.southernag.com/docs/labels_msds/eme.pdf[/url] ([url]http://www.southernag.com/docs/labels_msds/eme.pdf[/url]).  It's their Essential Minor Elements in granular form.

I would go with go with liquid as long as you need to supplement...plus KeyPlex is a better product.  Not even sure if that SouthernAg product is available locally and I have never heard of anybody using it.


Rob- what form of miconutrients does Excalibur fertilizer use? I was under the impression that it was enough

Nat

depends on the needs/price/availability and the type of plant.


Rob
??  not sure what you are talking about.
 My question is - is Excalibur Fertilizer enough in terms of nutrition, for most tropical trees we are growing here? I see quite a few people using supplements with it.  What is your take on using Excalibur alone, like they recommend.

 Also, Carbo- the 50 pound bag actually goes pretty quick - its not as big a bag as you might think.  It also has no specific expiration date. And its a bargain. Just my opinion

nat
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: zands on August 14, 2012, 09:53:00 AM
My question is - is Excalibur Fertilizer enough in terms of nutrition, for most tropical trees we are growing here? I see quite a few people using supplements with it.  What is your take on using Excalibur alone, like they recommend.

Very simple answer. My high ph soil blocks absorption (all or in part) of certain minor elements via roots...So must apply them via foliar spray. I don't think your soil has such a bad or any high ph problem. You can ask your local ag agent extension or local master gardeners.
Even if your soil ph is OK you can still help fruit trees with foliars

PJB is probably (I don't know his soil) a very good example of a guy with much better than average fruit trees due to his extensive foliar spray program. His are growing and branching out faster and fruiting faster with good fruit set going by his photos

PJB is actually also applying NPK via foliar. It gets into plant quicker. It is what the pros and citrus orchards might be using because money is on the line and they want their trees to produce! They cannot afford to be casual like a guy with fruit trees in his backyard

In school did you want to be an average student or an excellent student?   8)    Me...so far my fruit trees are average students because I don't use foliars nearly as much as PJB. But I am looking into it for my younger/recently planted fruit trees. I have a ragged avocado (Lula)....just planted last month and can use a PJB intensive and dittos for a new Coc mango tree planted that looks great but I want it to come along fast and produce fast. Because it is centerpiece in my front yard

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: TnTrobbie on August 19, 2012, 04:31:01 PM
Pim Saen Mun. Chlorosis?! Never seen patterns like these  ???

(http://img40.imageshack.us/img40/5136/img1320eq.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/40/img1320eq.jpg/)
(http://img31.imageshack.us/img31/365/img1322d.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/31/img1322d.jpg/)
(http://img839.imageshack.us/img839/8725/img1325h.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/839/img1325h.jpg/)

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 19, 2012, 10:38:49 PM
I don't think these are signs of a deficiency.  Looks more like some chemical exposure.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Pancrazio on September 05, 2012, 06:48:41 PM
My potted mangos are going trought what i think it is the last growt flush of the season.
Unluckly they are showing what seems to be some mineral deficencies. It understandable, I watered them all the summer long with just my well water wich is pretty rich in carbonates.
Now, if someone can tell me what mineral I should give them, I would be grateful. I'm not sure if it is the usual iron issue.

Kensington Pride; just grafted:
(http://i.imgur.com/0vwc9.jpg?1)

Mun (Nam doc mai type):
(http://i.imgur.com/FbSkg.jpg?1)

Both have taken copious amount of heat over the 100F with very low umidity, during their flushes, while the plant were relatively small. I don't know if this may have made the thing worse. Anyhow they aren't recovering right now while the daily max doesn't go over 77F.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: MangoFang on September 05, 2012, 07:05:02 PM
Hi Pan - I'm no expert in this, but the first picture could have some mineral dificiency  - though it doesn't look too bad to me, but the second one simply looks like the lighter color of a new growth flush - which then darkens with age....

Let's see what some other people say....

Gary
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: amaqeq on September 05, 2012, 07:38:35 PM
iron and to lesser extent manganese and zinc can cause almost similar symptoms of yellowing ( chlorosis ) that affects new growth first
with iron chlorosis the veins should look bit darker than the rest of the leaf
sometime over watering and damage to the roots can cause that look
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on September 06, 2012, 12:40:33 AM
Pan,
The first picture appears to show deficiency of Sulfur.

The second shows deficiency of Zinc.

Give them both some wettable sulfur and some Zinc sulfate.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on September 06, 2012, 10:48:26 AM
Good job, Har. You're a plant doctor :-).

Pan,
The first picture appears to show deficiency of Sulfur.

The second shows deficiency of Zinc.

Give them both some wettable sulfur and some Zinc sulfate.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Pancrazio on September 06, 2012, 03:41:52 PM
Thank you guys for your quick and useful answers.
I mixed today some wettable suphur to the water i used for irrigation, and i hope to see some sign of recovery soon.
Zinc sulphur is pretty hard to find! But i'll find that somewhere.
Honestly, i really should look for some ineherently acidic fertilizer (i was thinking about ammonia sulphate) because, on the long run, my pot become filled with carbonates.
Usually this isn't an issue on hardier plants because the winter rain "wash away" the excess of carbonates, but mangos during winter stay under cover, so basically they receve carbonates all year long.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: anaxel on September 08, 2012, 08:49:48 AM
I have a problem on the lower leaves of the tree, it becomes yellow with white dots, the tree grows and seem healthy, she made ​​flowers in July and now with more flowers. :-[
where is the problem leaves?

j'ai un problème sur les feuilles du bas de l'arbre,elle devienne jaune avec des points blancs,l'arbre grandit et parais bonne santé ,elle à fait des fleures  en juillet  et maintenant avec beaucoup plus fleuri.
où est le problème des feuilles? :-[


(http://s10.postimage.org/kcy20pi91/P1200363.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/kcy20pi91/)
(http://s13.postimage.org/bdzjiak5f/P1200364.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/bdzjiak5f/)
(http://s13.postimage.org/dvfw3atfn/P1200366.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/dvfw3atfn/)
(http://s17.postimage.org/j07en1t7v/P1200368.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/j07en1t7v/)                      (http://s12.postimage.org/lo69s6cp5/P1200367.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/lo69s6cp5/)


Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on September 09, 2012, 07:48:47 AM
Please check on the Underside of the leaves, with a magnifying glass.  You will probably find an infestation of mites or thrips.   If so, spray with insecticidal soap and neem oil or spray oil.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Pancrazio on September 09, 2012, 08:18:43 AM
Another question. Not a true issue because both of those damages are healing, but i fear that on the next winter i'll have to deal with it once more.
My plant overall overwintered fine. There were some exception, obviously, with some leaf edges burned, but i would have defined that kind of damage "minor".

Still on 2 plants i have experienced some bark dieback. The first one (and the most dangerous one) has been the dieback on my plant in ground. The bark died on half trunk, well below the graft point, but oddly enough on the south half of the trunk. This is important because it died where it received more sun and overall heat (keep in mind that my north side of the cover i use for my plant is well insulated, so there is really a small irradiation from that side).
The second plant is a seedling Kensignton Pride. Even this plant died on the south side of the trunk, i discovered it just in spring. As you can see, even in this case, the damage is very low on the trunk.
Now, i'm clueless. Since this damage showed just after winter i would assume that it must have been cold damage but:
1)It is suspect that on both plant it showed on the south side of the trunk. This is tipical of scorches.
2)The Kensington Pride plant has been inside my home during the coldest day of the winter, so id didn't experienced all the cold the other plant experienced.
3)I have never heard from anyone of you about scorches on you mangos. But indeed, most mangos don't get the dark environment my plants get.
4)I need to understand if it has been cold damage or a scorch because they have differnt ways to be prevented.
5)The leaf damage of my plant has been, as i said, very minima. I don't know if bark should be affected by some frezzing weater unable to damage the leaves.
So, what do you think?
Can a mango bark be so badly scorched after a winter in a dark envoriment? And if it isn't scorch, what is it? Something biological maybe?

In-ground plant:
(http://i.imgur.com/b73lT.jpg?1)

Kensington Pride:
(http://i.imgur.com/cra7Q.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on September 09, 2012, 09:16:58 AM
Another question. Not a true issue because both of those damages are healing, but i fear that on the next winter i'll have to deal with it once more.
My plant overall overwintered fine. There were some exception, obviously, with some leaf edges burned, but i would have defined that kind of damage "minor".

Still on 2 plants i have experienced some bark dieback. The first one (and the most dangerous one) has been the dieback on my plant in ground. The bark died on half trunk, well below the graft point, but oddly enough on the south half of the trunk. This is important because it died where it received more sun and overall heat (keep in mind that my north side of the cover i use for my plant is well insulated, so there is really a small irradiation from that side).
The second plant is a seedling Kensignton Pride. Even this plant died on the south side of the trunk, i discovered it just in spring. As you can see, even in this case, the damage is very low on the trunk.
Now, i'm clueless. Since this damage showed just after winter i would assume that it must have been cold damage but:
1)It is suspect that on both plant it showed on the south side of the trunk. This is tipical of scorches.
2)The Kensington Pride plant has been inside my home during the coldest day of the winter, so id didn't experienced all the cold the other plant experienced.
3)I have never heard from anyone of you about scorches on you mangos. But indeed, most mangos don't get the dark environment my plants get.
4)I need to understand if it has been cold damage or a scorch because they have differnt ways to be prevented.
5)The leaf damage of my plant has been, as i said, very minima. I don't know if bark should be affected by some frezzing weater unable to damage the leaves.
So, what do you think?
Can a mango bark be so badly scorched after a winter in a dark envoriment? And if it isn't scorch, what is it? Something biological maybe?

In-ground plant:
([url]http://i.imgur.com/b73lT.jpg?1[/url])

Kensington Pride:
([url]http://i.imgur.com/cra7Q.jpg[/url])


The second picture looks like potential sunburn, which you would treat with painting the trunk with diluted white latex paint to reflect some of the heat.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: anaxel on September 09, 2012, 10:57:26 AM
I looked at the leaves under the magnifying glass, I found that there were small red spider (mite) on the leaves, are small red spots on the photos.

(http://s17.postimage.org/klsp25wyj/P1200392.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/klsp25wyj/)
(http://s16.postimage.org/bi091iez5/P1200391.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/bi091iez5/)
(http://s16.postimage.org/uuvqlitzl/P1200390.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/uuvqlitzl/)
(http://s18.postimage.org/5ih3bnoqt/P1200387.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/5ih3bnoqt/)
sorry for the blurry pictures. :-[
I immediately treated with black soap (olive).

thank you guanabanus. ;) 8)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on September 09, 2012, 10:40:06 PM
Pan,

I am not sure about your mango trunks, but consider that sun on frost worsens the damage.

Also, where there is more moisture in the air, frost crystals form, and penetrate, at a warmer temperature than drier air.  At an educational woodsy garden that I used to manage, in 2010 we had light frost damage, all of it precisely in the places that I had considered most protected, downwind from ponds and waterfalls.

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: amaqeq on September 10, 2012, 12:24:12 AM
Pancrazio
about the second photo in your first question
the mango with bleached top
there are different approaches to deal with trace element deficiency
and it depends also on what scale are you dealing with
orchard owners will have 25kg bags of metal sulfates like Manganese Zinc Copper
Magnesium and Iron, mostly sulfate salts are cheep in big quantities has good solubility and are less hygroscopic they are distributed individually to correct specific deficiency
you can buy them at agriculture warehouses at 25kg bags each (mostly no less)
in chemical supply stores per kilo
or ask in nearby nursery or local farmer

just for zinc there is even simpler method:
buy an aa zinc charcoal battery, open it take out the zinc dust and wash it
or scrape bit of zinc from galvanized steel upper surface
mix the salvaged Zinc with kitchen vinegar and let stand for few days
after concentrating the solution it start to crystallize
those crystals of zinc acetate are great zinc source for plants
 
the approach of dealing with every deficiency individually might not suit everyone
sometime such deficiency is only the first sign of brother soil or root problem
in other times an deficiency can mimic other one or be the first one in a row

if you are only growing few trees and few of them are in pots
you can be better of buying an mix of Chelated micro elements
the good ones are suited for very broad pH level, possible to use as foliar spray
or drench and compatible with most other fertilizers
in Italy there are few mixes from at least two different companies that i know of:
AkzoNobel Micronutrients (AkzoNobel have few types)
labin micromix (labin also have few types)
each mix has slightly different percentage of trace elements
and might use different chelating agent, in any case it is safe way to solve and prevent
problems of micro elements shortages, acute ones and and the ones who are just cooking
mostly those mixes are also soled in 1kg dry packages
or as a solution at 1, 5, 10,liters packages
the dry powder if kept close and dry has very good shelf life

regarding ammonium sulphate, sometime potted plants are not so happy with ammoniacal form of nitrate that is of course it you are referring to potted plants

that all subject can be debated by different experience and approach
mine is just one of them

 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Pancrazio on September 11, 2012, 07:55:42 AM
Guys, thank you very much for all the attention you gave to my messages!

@Guanabanus: It's very hard to tell what happened, i know. Simply because under my cover the plant has been exposed to every single hazardous condition that can happen! But with a minium outside of the cover of 19F, i can't avoid to put it on. Yet, the thermometer i putted inside the cover didn't show any temperature under 37F so i would exclude the ice crystals, even more because, obviuosly, inside the air was stagnant, so no wind chill for me. But indeed under the covere there were a lot of water, so humidity was high.

@amaqeq: Thank you for your long and exhaustive explanation. Indeed i have few tropical plants, wich i grow basically for fun. I own also several temperate fruit plants in ground but they don't give me any nutritional problem, because luckly i have a very good soil in my orchard. Probably 25kg of sulfate would last for a couple of decades here. :) So i have got to find someone wich sell them in little amounts. I think, if i'm not going to solve this with any method involving sulphates, i'll switch to chelated. So far i have used only EDTA chelated of iron (for lemons and azaleas), but i don't have any chelated at hand right now, even if i know that is very easy to find in any nursery here.
Regarding zinc, anyhow, i have some iron wire treated with zinc to avoid rust. Can i use it to extract zinc with vinegar?? I haven't AA batteries, i use only rechargeable ones.
I will look for the companies you mentioned, having at hand some chelated can be useful. Thank you!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on September 11, 2012, 09:34:57 AM
Amaqeq,
Very good points.

Another manufacturer of excellent chelated micronutrients, in Italy, is BREXIL.  I buy some of their products here in Florida.  I agree that these would work well for Pan.

In northern Florida and southern Georgia, Zinc sulfate is easy to find, because every pecan grower needs it.  But here in south Florida one usually has to order it on the internet.


Pancrazio,

In calm conditions with high humidity, 37-degrees Fahrenheit is the highest temperature at which frost crystals can form.  Frost is less likely to form when there is breeze or wind.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on September 16, 2012, 12:01:17 PM
DELETED
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on September 16, 2012, 12:13:10 PM
Probably Powdery Mildew damage during the prolonged high humidity. 

On the other hand, it also looks like damage from excessive fertilizer salts.  If fertilizer is put down when the ground is soggy, it can all dissolve at once.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on September 16, 2012, 01:33:35 PM
Wow, Har, you're the boss. You should setup an internet tree consulting biz :-).

Probably Powdery Mildew damage during the prolonged high humidity. 

On the other hand, it also looks like damage from excessive fertilizer salts.  If fertilizer is put down when the ground is soggy, it can all dissolve at once.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on September 16, 2012, 08:25:03 PM
Thanks Har and Jeff.  So what is the recommendation?  Lots of water?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on September 16, 2012, 09:03:13 PM
I assume you already are getting enough water in this weather. 

If it was fertilizer damage, and you don't see more damage developing, you can just hope that a brief spike of excess happened and is already past.  If it is getting worse, you can apply Calcium sulfate or even lime to calm down some of the salts.  You can also spray or drench with silicates or humates.

Safer Soap, spray oils, and many other things are useful against Powdery Mildew.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on September 17, 2012, 08:03:02 AM
I assume you already are getting enough water in this weather. 

If it was fertilizer damage, and you don't see more damage developing, you can just hope that a brief spike of excess happened and is already past.  If it is getting worse, you can apply Calcium sulfate or even lime to calm down some of the salts.  You can also spray or drench with silicates or humates.

Safer Soap, spray oils, and many other things are useful against Powdery Mildew.
Be careful spraying oils with clear skies and full, hot sun.  Sulfur fungicide works well for powdery mildew.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: anaxel on September 25, 2012, 04:49:13 AM
hi friends,
I have a big problem with my langra mango tree, rootstock is very good, the problem is the graft.
anyone can view photos, help me urgently and tell me what to do.
thank you very much.

(http://s15.postimage.org/6ts2bq013/P1200554.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/6ts2bq013/)
(http://s7.postimage.org/77n71l9x3/P1200544.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/77n71l9x3/)
(http://s9.postimage.org/r1rs1brnv/P1200556.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/r1rs1brnv/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on September 25, 2012, 08:40:17 AM
It looks like Powdery Mildew damage, possibly combined with Thrips damage.  Have you looked at the underside of the leaves with a magnifier?

Also, if the rootstock has no leaves and no seed left to feed it, the roots may be starving.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: anaxel on September 25, 2012, 09:21:36 AM
thank you for the answer, ;)
photos were taken yesterday, today, there are over leaf on mango tree, they are all brown and dry.
the rootstock has no leaf, it is naked, but green, the problem is at the top of the mango tree.
I looked at the underside of the leaf with a magnifying glass, there was nothing.
 :'( :-[

( I should let it grow a few leaves of rootstock, to promote the growth of the graft and root or not? )
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on September 25, 2012, 11:29:05 AM
thank you for the answer, ;)
photos were taken yesterday, today, there are over leaf on mango tree, they are all brown and dry.
the rootstock has no leaf, it is naked, but green, the problem is at the top of the mango tree.
I looked at the underside of the leaf with a magnifying glass, there was nothing.
 :'( :-[

( I should let it grow a few leaves of rootstock, to promote the growth of the graft and root or not? )

You probably should not have cut off the top of the roostock until the growth from the graft had hardened.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: anaxel on September 25, 2012, 12:39:35 PM
hi murahilin, ;)
to the top of the rootstock, I did not cut., he broke with the wind and I arranged with my chisel.
my luck is there still had an eye on the graft.
since it rot in the graft. :-[
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: anaxel on September 26, 2012, 10:32:42 AM
I was recommended to remove the soil and the roots dry, replace the present earth by peat.
after cutting the leaves 3/4 and put a transparent bag on top of the mango tree + light for new growth, appears.
What do you think? :-[
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on September 26, 2012, 10:45:56 AM
I was recommended to remove the soil and the roots dry, replace the present earth by peat.
after cutting the leaves 3/4 and put a transparent bag on top of the mango tree + light for new growth, appears.
What do you think? :-[
Not sure why you would have been advised to bare root it...I highly doubt that bare rooting it will help any (and actually may take even more away from a struggling/dying scion.  Cutting what leaves back by 3/4?

Also, unless you were to actually cut the rootstock back (which of course would mean cutting BELOW the graft), I doubt your rootstock will push any leaves at this point.  So with the graft struggling/dying and the rootstock possibly doing the same, you may be fighting an ultimate losing battle.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: anaxel on September 26, 2012, 11:13:46 AM
hi bsbullie,
ok,
thank you very much for your help everyone.
bye bye my langra mango tree  :'( :'( :'( :'(.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on September 27, 2012, 06:26:43 PM
Hi everybody! I have a little problem with my mango tree. It has some dark spots on the leaves, but this really located nothing serious. No leaves fell also. I just don't know what it is and I would like your help to remove those.

Here's some pictures:

(http://i1087.photobucket.com/albums/j469/Samuelforest/DSC04413.jpg)

(http://i1087.photobucket.com/albums/j469/Samuelforest/DSC04414.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on September 28, 2012, 07:13:44 AM
Nobody?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on September 28, 2012, 07:30:34 AM
Nobody?

You've given it less than a day for people to respond.  I'm not an expert, but I would guess anthracnose and would spray with copper sulfate solution.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on September 28, 2012, 07:51:33 AM
I was seeing the post getting down on list, so I thought nobody saw it. Thanks for the input! I'll get some copper sulfate.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on September 28, 2012, 08:15:07 AM
While spraying copper fungicide won't hurt I am pretty sure that is not anthracnose.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on September 28, 2012, 06:22:22 PM
What do you think it is Rob? I watched some pictures and it doesn't not look like anthracnose, I have no spots on the fruits and flowers look healthy.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: CoPlantNut on September 28, 2012, 06:50:40 PM
What do you think it is Rob? I watched some pictures and it doesn't not look like anthracnose, I have no spots on the fruits and flowers look healthy.

I'm not a mango expert at all, but I bet those spots are caused by the dramatic change in conditions from when the leaf had initially hardened-- specifically in your case, I'm guessing it is the reduced humidity, new artificial lighting conditions, and possibly warmer temperatures (at least more consistently warm, day and night) the plant is now getting in your indoor plant room.  I've seen it on mango seedlings I've grown before when I move them outside (I have high humidity inside, low outside), but I see it all the time on other plants like plumeria, carambola, acerola and others.  I don't think it is anything to worry about; the leaf may not look perfect but it is still working to give the plant energy.  I really doubt it is anything fungal in your indoor setup, unless you're keeping the humidity high using ultrasonic humidifiers- and my experience has been that mold will grow on your walls before it does on the plants in that situation.

   Kevin
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on September 28, 2012, 09:49:43 PM
Thanks Kevin, it release pressure on me :). I have only saw it on my Carrie, not pickering...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on September 29, 2012, 08:13:28 AM
As the spots mostly are not bordered by veins, I don't think it is bacterial leaf spot.  I'm not sure what.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on September 29, 2012, 09:08:07 AM
So, I shouldn't worry? Only if the spots begin to affect all the leaves?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on September 30, 2012, 10:37:13 AM
It started to get worse! That leaf I showed you is now completely affected...Other leaves start to be inffected also. What should I do?
Please Help!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on September 30, 2012, 10:44:10 AM
I am not sure what it is at this point either.  What are you feeding it and how often?  If the leaves have gotten worse, please post new pictures as that MIGHT help.

Are the plants now indoors?  If they are indoors now, did this first appear while outdoors or not till you moved them indoors?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on September 30, 2012, 01:52:17 PM
The tree is indoor and I fertilized it with half the strenght of miracle grow each week.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on September 30, 2012, 01:54:34 PM
The tree is indoor and I fertilized it with half the strenght of miracle grow each week.
What kind of miracle grow (liquid/granular), how did yo apply it?  Each week, for how many weeks in a row?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: CoPlantNut on September 30, 2012, 02:44:55 PM
The tree is indoor and I fertilized it with half the strenght of miracle grow each week.

How close are the leaves to your 1000W light?  Any idea what the humidity is in your plant room?

One suggestion I would have is to get a cheap, lightweight strip thermometer (they sell them at pet shops for use on the outside of fish tanks, usually $5 or less) that you can lay on one of the leaves to see how hot it is getting under your light.  The leaves may be getting hotter than the ambient temperature in your plant room, and while your pictures aren't typical of leaf burn from way too much heat, it could be that they are getting a little too warm.  A cheap strip thermometer will tell you if this is happening, and if it is, you can either move the plants further from the light or get a small oscillating fan to help move air around and cool the leaves off.

   Kevin
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on September 30, 2012, 07:26:04 PM
Quote
What kind of miracle grow (liquid/granular), how did yo apply it?  Each week, for how many weeks in a row?

I use the all purpose fertilizer. I used it maybye for 4 weeks now, but it doesn't look like fertilizer burn. My Pickering gets the same water with the same concentration of fertilizer and don't have the symptoms of the Carrie.

Quote
How close are the leaves to your 1000W light?  Any idea what the humidity is in your plant room?

The light 26 inches away from the plants and the humidity ranges between 40-50%.

Quote
One suggestion I would have is to get a cheap, lightweight strip thermometer (they sell them at pet shops for use on the outside of fish tanks, usually $5 or less) that you can lay on one of the leaves to see how hot it is getting under your light.  The leaves may be getting hotter than the ambient temperature in your plant room, and while your pictures aren't typical of leaf burn from way too much heat, it could be that they are getting a little too warm.  A cheap strip thermometer will tell you if this is happening, and if it is, you can either move the plants further from the light or get a small oscillating fan to help move air around and cool the leaves off.

What is the perfect temperature close to the leaves? I have already 2 fans. Should I get a exhaust fan to cool the room down?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: CoPlantNut on October 01, 2012, 12:43:48 PM
Quote
What kind of miracle grow (liquid/granular), how did yo apply it?  Each week, for how many weeks in a row?

I use the all purpose fertilizer. I used it maybye for 4 weeks now, but it doesn't look like fertilizer burn. My Pickering gets the same water with the same concentration of fertilizer and don't have the symptoms of the Carrie.

Quote
How close are the leaves to your 1000W light?  Any idea what the humidity is in your plant room?

The light 26 inches away from the plants and the humidity ranges between 40-50%.

Quote
One suggestion I would have is to get a cheap, lightweight strip thermometer (they sell them at pet shops for use on the outside of fish tanks, usually $5 or less) that you can lay on one of the leaves to see how hot it is getting under your light.  The leaves may be getting hotter than the ambient temperature in your plant room, and while your pictures aren't typical of leaf burn from way too much heat, it could be that they are getting a little too warm.  A cheap strip thermometer will tell you if this is happening, and if it is, you can either move the plants further from the light or get a small oscillating fan to help move air around and cool the leaves off.

What is the perfect temperature close to the leaves? I have already 2 fans. Should I get a exhaust fan to cool the room down?

26 inches from a non-moving, un-shielded 1000W light might be a little close, but the pictures you've posted don't really look like heat stress, and every setup is different...  Having the fans running in your plant room is good, and 40-50% humidity is pretty decent too-- both should help to keep the leaves from getting too hot.  If the Pickering is a similar distance from the light and isn't showing these issues, I would think it is not heat stress...  But in the absence of any other suggestions you might try moving the affected plant another 20-30cm away from the light and see if the problem stops.

I don't know what a maximum temperature for the leaves is; in my plant room the air temperature is 86F / 30C but thermometers mounted at the highest leaf level read 95F / 35C and I don't have issues with burning (unless I just sprayed the plants down with oil); I would guess 100F / 38C or above might start to be a problem if it is kept that warm all day long.  I wouldn't worry about an exhaust fan unless air temperatures get above 90F / 32C on a regular basis.

   Kevin
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: CoPlantNut on October 01, 2012, 12:52:18 PM
One more thing I should add: if it is only the top-most leaves closest to the light that are showing these issues, then it could be heat / light stress and the stuff I said earlier might apply.  If it is only showing up on lower leaves then it probably isn't heat stress.  From the pictures it isn't clear which leaves are affected.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on October 01, 2012, 05:20:41 PM
They are leaves that started to burn, the one I showed everybody. The back turned crispy brown and top also. I guess it is due to excessive heat.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: CoPlantNut on October 01, 2012, 06:17:05 PM
They are leaves that started to burn, the one I showed everybody. The back turned crispy brown and top also. I guess it is due to excessive heat.

If that's the case, moving the plant further from the light, or putting the light on a (constantly moving) light mover are the only fixes.  Cooling the air in your room will help some, but it won't prevent burns caused by infrared radiation coming from the bulb.  Obviously, moving the plant away from the bulb is the cheapest option...

   Kevin
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on October 01, 2012, 07:14:00 PM
What I don't understand is that it doesn't affect the top leaves? I guess it is not due to the light to be too close. The temperature went up to 36C and I guess it cooked the leaves. What should I do to reduce heat?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on October 01, 2012, 07:18:49 PM
So what parts f the plant were affected?  Top leaves are fine and lower leaves look bad?  What about the other plants on the room, any problems on those?

Your room was close to 100 degrees, for what duration?  How long do you run the lights?  How big is the room?

I have had plants in a room with both a 1000 MH and 1000W HPS with no burning.

Please post more. new pictures.  I do not think it has anything to do with the light.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on October 01, 2012, 08:22:50 PM
Some at the bottom and some also on top. Not a lot of leaves are affected, maybye 5-7 leaves. No problem with the other plants in the grow room. Only with the lychee today which lost 2 leaves due to the hot temperatures, but nothing like the mango tree, which has leaves with black spots that turns crips brown. I run the lights for 12 hours a day. The room is 6'8'' by 8' and the top touches about 10'.

How far your lights were?

I'll post pictures tomorrow. I opened my grow room and opened my garage door about 2'', so it should cool down.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on October 02, 2012, 05:23:39 PM
Here's some pictures of a leaf.

(http://i1087.photobucket.com/albums/j469/Samuelforest/DSC04415.jpg)
(http://i1087.photobucket.com/albums/j469/Samuelforest/DSC04416.jpg)

It is burned, but I can really see some little black spot. They are really small. Some top leaves also look super healthy.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 03, 2012, 12:25:11 AM
It does look like sunburn to me.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: TnTrobbie on October 07, 2012, 05:32:43 PM
(http://imageshack.us/a/img825/9130/56227986.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/825/56227986.jpg/)
(http://imageshack.us/a/img840/9738/23947808.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/840/23947808.jpg/)
Nutritional or *gulp* pest ?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropicalgrower89 on October 07, 2012, 05:41:13 PM
([url]http://imageshack.us/a/img825/9130/56227986.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/825/56227986.jpg/[/url])
([url]http://imageshack.us/a/img840/9738/23947808.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/840/23947808.jpg/[/url])
Nutritional or *gulp* pest ?


Looks like the leaves are all stained-up by sprinkler well water.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: TnTrobbie on October 07, 2012, 05:46:19 PM
Yeah. The trunk that faces the sprinkler has the red iron well water stains. I'm more concerned with the wrinkling, curling, and "soft body" light green look of these young leaves. Did a soil acidifier chelate drench.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: MarinFla on October 14, 2012, 12:45:27 PM
WHAT Do I need to do differently???  I have been dealing with this stuff on and off  for a year now. I thought I just about had it beat and now it seems to be spreading to other trees. I guess I need to be more aggressive. It has up until now only been on my mango trees. Now I just found it just starting on my Jackfruit and Abui. Even after aggressively spraying with Copper, Dawn dish soap and Foliage Pro... it dried up and flaked some on my Carrie tree but it never completely went away and now it seems to be spreading.

Pictures below....need suggestions!

Glenn
(http://s14.postimage.org/qitg1zi2l/2012_10_14_11_59_49.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/qitg1zi2l/)

Carrie
(http://s12.postimage.org/cfyngng1l/2012_10_14_11_58_50.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/cfyngng1l/)

Keitt
(http://s13.postimage.org/tyf6g5bw3/2012_10_14_11_58_14.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/tyf6g5bw3/)


Jackfruit
(http://s14.postimage.org/3u8ug5q2l/2012_10_14_12_00_03.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/3u8ug5q2l/)

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on October 14, 2012, 03:39:55 PM
It is tough with some mangoes, especially.  The tree will out grow it, but it can spread and hinder the overall health of the tree.  I have used both Copper and Neem Oil with some success.  What works best is a high pressure hose spray.  I treat with neem or copper and then it the young trees with the hose.  The larger trees, I just let be.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: zands on October 14, 2012, 04:22:46 PM
This has to be ye old common black mold you see on roofs etc. I have some on a banana and it showered down this black gunk onto other plants. I will try to blast it off with water as Harry did
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on October 14, 2012, 04:39:42 PM
This has to be ye old common black mold you see on roofs etc. I have some on a banana and it showered down this black gunk onto other plants. I will try to blast it off with water as Harry did
Do you have any evidence that the mold that "shows up" on roofs effects plants?

Marin - are there any pests (scale, aphids, mealys, etc.) around?  Looks more like sooty mold to me.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on October 14, 2012, 05:03:42 PM
Do you have any evidence that the mold that "shows up" on roofs effects plants?

Marin - are there any pests (scale, aphids, mealys, etc.) around?  Looks more like sooty mold to me.


Yup, definitely looks like sooty mold to me.

Here is some info on sooty mold: http://baker.ifas.ufl.edu/Horticulture/documents/BlackSootyMoldonLandscapePlants.pdf (http://baker.ifas.ufl.edu/Horticulture/documents/BlackSootyMoldonLandscapePlants.pdf)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on October 14, 2012, 05:08:05 PM
It's coming from one one of t00 sources: 0) sooty mold from scale / aphids on the plants themselves, 1) a coconut tree, banana, etc above all your potted plants which has an infestation of evil spiraling white fly.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: TnTrobbie on October 14, 2012, 05:46:04 PM
Looks like sooty mold. I had that on a couple of lower branches of my NDM. It followed a scale infestation and it got so thick that some peices started to molt off the leaf. 3 apps of Ortho Volck oil (Lowes) did the trick. Scales died, sooty mold left.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: MarinFla on October 14, 2012, 06:52:58 PM
It's coming from one one of t00 sources: 0) sooty mold from scale / aphids on the plants themselves, 1) a coconut tree, banana, etc above all your potted plants which has an infestation of evil spiraling white fly.

I inspected all the trees when I took these pics and I found no scale at all, no mealy bugs anywhere, no aphids except for last week on the one tree that has no 'sooty mold' ---> last week my barbados cherry had yellow aphids and one spray of malathion and it was all cleared up. You may be onto something with the spiraling white fly as there are ficus hedges all around the perimeter of my yard and there are coconut palms hovering over top mingled along the property lines  ......The affected trees are pushing lots of new growth right now but it did stunt the Carrie for a whole season as it just started flushing in the last couple of weeks. I am not sure what to do at this point..... should I just douse everything with ______?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on October 14, 2012, 09:06:12 PM
Spiraling whitefly sucks badly. They poop out like 10x more sooty mold than scale. I have a coconut palm that bathes my car and driveway in black gunk :-(.

It's coming from one one of t00 sources: 0) sooty mold from scale / aphids on the plants themselves, 1) a coconut tree, banana, etc above all your potted plants which has an infestation of evil spiraling white fly.

I inspected all the trees when I took these pics and I found no scale at all, no mealy bugs anywhere, no aphids except for last week on the one tree that has no 'sooty mold' ---> last week my barbados cherry had yellow aphids and one spray of malathion and it was all cleared up. You may be onto something with the spiraling white fly as there are ficus hedges all around the perimeter of my yard and there are coconut palms hovering over top mingled along the property lines  ......The affected trees are pushing lots of new growth right now but it did stunt the Carrie for a whole season as it just started flushing in the last couple of weeks. I am not sure what to do at this point..... should I just douse everything with ______?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on October 14, 2012, 09:17:11 PM
It's coming from one one of t00 sources: 0) sooty mold from scale / aphids on the plants themselves, 1) a coconut tree, banana, etc above all your potted plants which has an infestation of evil spiraling white fly.


I inspected all the trees when I took these pics and I found no scale at all, no mealy bugs anywhere, no aphids except for last week on the one tree that has no 'sooty mold' ---> last week my barbados cherry had yellow aphids and one spray of malathion and it was all cleared up. You may be onto something with the spiraling white fly as there are ficus hedges all around the perimeter of my yard and there are coconut palms hovering over top mingled along the property lines  ......The affected trees are pushing lots of new growth right now but it did stunt the Carrie for a whole season as it just started flushing in the last couple of weeks. I am not sure what to do at this point..... should I just douse everything with ______?

The ficus whitefly is NOT the Spiraling Whitefly.  Look at the coconut as well as any bananas, birds of paradise, gumbi limbo and many other palm species the the spiraling whitefly affect (closely check all of your mangoes as the spiraling whitefly WILL make a mango tree their home).  The evidence of the spiraling whitefly is easily seen.  The bad thing if it is there is to rid the area of it can be a battle and expensive.  While I know some will disagree (good luck ridding them with washing/soaps/oils/Sevin if they are established), the chemicals to truly treat for spiraling whitefly are expensive and potent.  You will find some companies using commercial strength Imidacloprid (not Bayer Advanced but the real deal) but there is a lot of concern that that is not that effective.  The most effective seems to Safari or its generic equivalent.  Another problem is that if you only use the washing method and or soaps/oils and the infestation is beyond your property, you will not be ridding of them and they will most likely return.

You can check for the ficus whitefly but it will not be your source of the sooty mold.  If the ficus does have the whitefly and it is not treated correctly, it is a goner.

ficus whitefly  http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/mannion/pdfs/Ficus%20Whitefly%20%28Feb2010%29%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf (http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/mannion/pdfs/Ficus%20Whitefly%20%28Feb2010%29%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf)

spiraling whitefly  http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/mannion/pdfs/Rugose%20Spiraling%20Whitefly%20Nov2011.pdf (http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/mannion/pdfs/Rugose%20Spiraling%20Whitefly%20Nov2011.pdf)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: MarinFla on October 14, 2012, 09:22:13 PM
Spiraling whitefly sucks badly. They poop out like 10x more sooty mold than scale. I have a coconut palm that bathes my car and driveway in black gunk :-(.

It's coming from one one of t00 sources: 0) sooty mold from scale / aphids on the plants themselves, 1) a coconut tree, banana, etc above all your potted plants which has an infestation of evil spiraling white fly.

I inspected all the trees when I took these pics and I found no scale at all, no mealy bugs anywhere, no aphids except for last week on the one tree that has no 'sooty mold' ---> last week my barbados cherry had yellow aphids and one spray of malathion and it was all cleared up. You may be onto something with the spiraling white fly as there are ficus hedges all around the perimeter of my yard and there are coconut palms hovering over top mingled along the property lines  ......The affected trees are pushing lots of new growth right now but it did stunt the Carrie for a whole season as it just started flushing in the last couple of weeks. I am not sure what to do at this point..... should I just douse everything with ______?

Jeff,   Any heavy duty spray treatment I could hit it with? I have worked so hard this last 6 months to get everything healthy and lush that this is doubly  pissing me off!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: zands on October 14, 2012, 09:27:38 PM
@ bsbullie

The best way to get mold off roofs is not blasting each year via pressure cleaning your concrete tiles. Far better is the peroxide compound found in oxy-clean. You can find this powder on ebay and the internet. It amounts to being a powder version of H2O2. Prepare it right and use a one gallon garden sprayer on your roof problem. Let sit for hours or a day then rinse off with a garden hose. I have done this but with copper sulfate once and pool cleaner grade bleach another time. The better method is with the oxy-clean equivalent and there are reasons why.

Unless a roof is very neglected you never see such ugly black buildup you can find on plants, with me mostly bananas. So roof mold is not extensive enough to spread out and foul up plant leaves. My opinion is with our warm wet climate (SE Florida) there is always mold in the air looking for something to zero in on and build infestation on. This is how you can get an opportunistic black mold build up on your plants in one part of your yard
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: MarinFla on October 14, 2012, 09:29:30 PM
It's coming from one one of t00 sources: 0) sooty mold from scale / aphids on the plants themselves, 1) a coconut tree, banana, etc above all your potted plants which has an infestation of evil spiraling white fly.


I inspected all the trees when I took these pics and I found no scale at all, no mealy bugs anywhere, no aphids except for last week on the one tree that has no 'sooty mold' ---> last week my barbados cherry had yellow aphids and one spray of malathion and it was all cleared up. You may be onto something with the spiraling white fly as there are ficus hedges all around the perimeter of my yard and there are coconut palms hovering over top mingled along the property lines  ......The affected trees are pushing lots of new growth right now but it did stunt the Carrie for a whole season as it just started flushing in the last couple of weeks. I am not sure what to do at this point..... should I just douse everything with ______?

The ficus whitefly is NOT the Spiraling Whitefly.  Look at the coconut as well as any bananas, birds of paradise, gumbi limbo and many other palm species the the spiraling whitefly affect (closely check all of your mangoes as the spiraling whitefly WILL make a mango tree their home).  The evidence of the spiraling whitefly is easily seen.  The bad thing if it is there is to rid the area of it can be a battle and expensive.  While I know some will disagree (good luck ridding them with washing/soaps/oils/Sevin if they are established), the chemicals to truly treat for spiraling whitefly are expensive and potent.  You will find some companies using commercial strength Imidacloprid (not Bayer Advanced but the real deal) but there is a lot of concern that that is not that effective.  The most effective seems to Safari or its generic equivalent.  Another problem is that if you only use the washing method and or soaps/oils and the infestation is beyond your property, you will not be ridding of them and they will most likely return.

You can check for the ficus whitefly but it will not be your source of the sooty mold.  If the ficus does have the whitefly and it is not treated correctly, it is a goner.

ficus whitefly  [url]http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/mannion/pdfs/Ficus%20Whitefly%20%28Feb2010%29%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf[/url] ([url]http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/mannion/pdfs/Ficus%20Whitefly%20%28Feb2010%29%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf[/url])

spiraling whitefly  [url]http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/mannion/pdfs/Rugose%20Spiraling%20Whitefly%20Nov2011.pdf[/url] ([url]http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/mannion/pdfs/Rugose%20Spiraling%20Whitefly%20Nov2011.pdf[/url])


Thanks Rob.....Now that I have checked out those links YES I have seen those spiraling white flies  :'(
I think I am going to call my pest control guy and get him to spray my entire yard for it before my mango trees get any more damage.
In the mean time...what is the most effective way to hit this sooty mold HARD???
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on October 14, 2012, 09:37:02 PM
@ bsbullie

The best way to get mold off roofs is not blasting each year via pressure cleaning your concrete tiles. Far better is the peroxide compound found in oxy-clean. You can find this powder on ebay and the internet. It amounts to being a powder version of H2O2. Prepare it right and use a one gallon garden sprayer on your roof problem. Let sit for hours or a day then rinse off with a garden hose. I have done this but with copper sulfate once and pool cleaner grade bleach another time. The better method is with the oxy-clean equivalent and there are reasons why.

Unless a roof is very neglected you never see such ugly black buildup you can find on plants, with me mostly bananas. So roof mold is not extensive enough to spread out and foul up plant leaves. My opinion is with our warm wet climate (SE Florida) there is always mold in the air looking for something to zero in on and build infestation on. This is how you can get an opportunistic black mold build up on your plants in one part of your yard
You are correct that pressure washing roofs is not the way to clean them...mostly as the person/company doing the cleaning usually damages the roof tiles, causing more money to be spent.

I am the president of my community (responsible for cleaning and maintaining roofs) and I have been on the roof-a-cide program for years now with no problems.

I still doubt that the dirt/mold that effects roofs is also a direct attacker of plants.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on October 14, 2012, 09:41:37 PM
It's coming from one one of t00 sources: 0) sooty mold from scale / aphids on the plants themselves, 1) a coconut tree, banana, etc above all your potted plants which has an infestation of evil spiraling white fly.


I inspected all the trees when I took these pics and I found no scale at all, no mealy bugs anywhere, no aphids except for last week on the one tree that has no 'sooty mold' ---> last week my barbados cherry had yellow aphids and one spray of malathion and it was all cleared up. You may be onto something with the spiraling white fly as there are ficus hedges all around the perimeter of my yard and there are coconut palms hovering over top mingled along the property lines  ......The affected trees are pushing lots of new growth right now but it did stunt the Carrie for a whole season as it just started flushing in the last couple of weeks. I am not sure what to do at this point..... should I just douse everything with ______?

The ficus whitefly is NOT the Spiraling Whitefly.  Look at the coconut as well as any bananas, birds of paradise, gumbi limbo and many other palm species the the spiraling whitefly affect (closely check all of your mangoes as the spiraling whitefly WILL make a mango tree their home).  The evidence of the spiraling whitefly is easily seen.  The bad thing if it is there is to rid the area of it can be a battle and expensive.  While I know some will disagree (good luck ridding them with washing/soaps/oils/Sevin if they are established), the chemicals to truly treat for spiraling whitefly are expensive and potent.  You will find some companies using commercial strength Imidacloprid (not Bayer Advanced but the real deal) but there is a lot of concern that that is not that effective.  The most effective seems to Safari or its generic equivalent.  Another problem is that if you only use the washing method and or soaps/oils and the infestation is beyond your property, you will not be ridding of them and they will most likely return.

You can check for the ficus whitefly but it will not be your source of the sooty mold.  If the ficus does have the whitefly and it is not treated correctly, it is a goner.

ficus whitefly  [url]http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/mannion/pdfs/Ficus%20Whitefly%20%28Feb2010%29%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf[/url] ([url]http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/mannion/pdfs/Ficus%20Whitefly%20%28Feb2010%29%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf[/url])

spiraling whitefly  [url]http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/mannion/pdfs/Rugose%20Spiraling%20Whitefly%20Nov2011.pdf[/url] ([url]http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/mannion/pdfs/Rugose%20Spiraling%20Whitefly%20Nov2011.pdf[/url])


Thanks Rob.....Now that I have checked out those links YES I have seen those spiraling white flies  :'(
I think I am going to call my pest control guy and get him to spray my entire yard for it before my mango trees get any more damage.
In the mean time...what is the most effective way to hit this sooty mold HARD???

Be very careful when having your pest company treat the spiraling whitefly.  Without being accusatory, many will take your money and the problem will not be gone.  I would even call around to get quote and methods/types of applications.  Just be prepared, it will not be cheap.

As f the sooty mold...get rid of the best and the sooty mold will stop.  I have posted this link before I believe but in any event, here you go...  http://baker.ifas.ufl.edu/Horticulture/documents/BlackSootyMoldonLandscapePlants.pdf (http://baker.ifas.ufl.edu/Horticulture/documents/BlackSootyMoldonLandscapePlants.pdf)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: zands on October 14, 2012, 09:50:39 PM
As f the sooty mold...get rid of the best and the sooty mold will stop.  I have posted this link before I believe but in any event, here you go...  http://baker.ifas.ufl.edu/Horticulture/documents/BlackSootyMoldonLandscapePlants.pdf (http://baker.ifas.ufl.edu/Horticulture/documents/BlackSootyMoldonLandscapePlants.pdf)

The free floating black mold that is always in the air feeds on the insect excreted honey dew (explained at your link) and grows explosively. Looks awful
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on October 14, 2012, 10:09:58 PM
As f the sooty mold...get rid of the best and the sooty mold will stop.  I have posted this link before I believe but in any event, here you go...  [url]http://baker.ifas.ufl.edu/Horticulture/documents/BlackSootyMoldonLandscapePlants.pdf[/url] ([url]http://baker.ifas.ufl.edu/Horticulture/documents/BlackSootyMoldonLandscapePlants.pdf[/url])

The free floating black mold that is always in the air feeds on the insect excreted honey dew (explained at your link) and grows explosively. Looks awful

Not really sure what you are truly saying but unless you have insect infested plants that could be causing sooty mold on your roof, your roof is just plain dirty.

From the IFAS link I posted, "Sooty mold grows on a substance called “honeydew” which is excreted from certain insects such as aphids, soft scales, whiteflies and mealybugs. These insects feed on a variety of landscape plants and
can be found on the leaves and stems where they use special mouthparts to pierce plant tissues and suck
out the juices from within. During this time these insects excrete large amounts of a sticky, sugary
substance commonly called “honeydew”. The excreted honeydew coats leaves, stems, and fruit,
stimulating the growth of sooty mold."

I do not think most people have insects causing honeydew on their roofs.  The most common causes of dirty roofs are dirt, tar, acid, jet fuel, and algae.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: zands on October 14, 2012, 10:18:01 PM
@bsbulie


good luck
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on October 14, 2012, 10:35:53 PM
@bsbulie

  • there is plenty of black mold in the air here
  • it will latch onto and feed on whatever it can
  • it can be the "honey dew" on plants
  • it can be on roof tiles and shingles
  • black mold can sink roots into roof concrete tiles....somehow this is food for it
  • black mold can also infest asphalt roof shingles....blast those with a pressure cleaner and you are really asking for trouble ..... you will wear them down considerably

good luck
Not all black mold is sooty mold...there is more than one type of mold.  Yes, sooty mold can be found on non-plant surfaces but it is due to an infected plant above or in the specific area (as in an overhead tree affected by an insect causing honeydew).

As I stated, I have 320 roofs to keep clean...they are never hit with any type of pressure washer.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: zands on October 14, 2012, 11:06:28 PM

Not all black mold is sooty mold...there is more than one type of mold.  Yes, sooty mold can be found on non-plant surfaces but it is due to an infected plant above or in the specific area (as in an overhead tree affected by an insect causing honeydew).

As I stated, I have 320 roofs to keep clean...they are never hit with any type of pressure washer.


Here is what you need the H2O2 equivalent for removing black and green from roofs>>  http://compare.ebay.com/like/200618412450?var=lv&ltyp=AllFixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar&_lwgsi=y&cbt=y (http://compare.ebay.com/like/200618412450?var=lv&ltyp=AllFixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar&_lwgsi=y&cbt=y) but I think you already have the situation under control.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: MarinFla on October 15, 2012, 04:09:09 PM
It IS DEFINITELY Spiralling White Fly and it is VERY BAD. The Coconut Palms are tall and dripping honeydew on everything. The infestation is spreading to my fruit trees. I need to do something drastic!!

I am thinking soil drench of imidacloprid (commercial strength) and then spray all the trees with malathion. Thoughts?

Someone told me I have to 'inject' the coconut palms to treat them....is this true??

Someone posted a link to commercial imidacloprid ....Murahilin? PJ ? I need it and I should have saved it :(



Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on October 15, 2012, 04:50:17 PM
It IS DEFINITELY Spiralling White Fly and it is VERY BAD. The Coconut Palms are tall and dripping honeydew on everything. The infestation is spreading to my fruit trees. I need to do something drastic!!

I am thinking soil drench of imidacloprid (commercial strength) and then spray all the trees with malathion. Thoughts?

Someone told me I have to 'inject' the coconut palms to treat them....is this true??

Someone posted a link to commercial imidacloprid ....Murahilin? PJ ? I need it and I should have saved it :(

I am having the same problem with my coconut trees and other trees. I don't think imidacloprid is the way to go though. A strong stream of water will remove the spiraling white fly from your trees. If you add some soap to that strong stream of water it will kill the white flys while also removing them. Then after a few weeks of weekly spraying, when the population has been reduced, you could purchase some beneficial bugs that parasitize spiraling white fly eggs and then your problem could possibly be controlled. Using chemicals like imidacloprid is generally not good for the environment and you should consider trying out alternative safer treatments before you go the systemic pesticide route.

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on October 15, 2012, 05:11:52 PM
As much as i do not like the chemical nuking, this is one of the times it is warranted.  I have gone through an infestation on 320 properties and there was no option but chemicals.  There is a reason why these buggers are infesting plants everywhere and not reducing by number.  If a nice soap spray with beneficial bugs were an easy and reliable fix, these guys would no be considered an epidemic.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Californiatropicals on October 15, 2012, 10:37:25 PM
Hey everyone, Thought I'd post some pics and try and get some feedback on my mango trees.

(http://i1243.photobucket.com/albums/gg545/dvaldez1286/MangotreeManila_zps4de2862b.jpg)

These two are my manila mangoes.. they've been outside the past 3 years even in winter with zero protection..  the stems have grown thick and they had a lot of good growth!

This year most of the growth seems to be from the roots.. and not on the top  of the growth.. Does anyone know why  it's doing this?  I've pruned back all the lower growth a few times this year.. but it seems to keep coming back.. anyone know why? 
(http://i1243.photobucket.com/albums/gg545/dvaldez1286/mangogrowthroots_zps6ce98458.jpg)

On the bright side.. I recently got a beautiful valencia pride mango from florida just about a month ago.. it's grown more in a month than my manila mangoes grow in a year! I have great expectations of VP here!

(http://i1243.photobucket.com/albums/gg545/dvaldez1286/valenciapridemango_zps1370aa37.jpg) This is when i got it a month ago

(http://i1243.photobucket.com/albums/gg545/dvaldez1286/MangoVPgrowth_zpsf163e6fc.jpg) this is it today..  ;D





Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on October 16, 2012, 07:36:25 AM
Your mango trees that are growing mostly from the roots are doing what almost all grafted mangoes want to do.....that is the rootstock wants to grow from itself rather than supporting the foreign grafted tree above.  If you want to maintain the variety that you purchased the tree for, you best trim off the new growth from the roots.  Otherwise, before long the root sprouts will overtake the tree and the roots will stop sending nutrients to the grafted portion of the tree.  The new tree grown from the roots will be a seedling and its own individual mango with its own characteristics.  Those characterics will likey be substantially inferior to the grafted portion that you purchased the tree for.

Edited for spelling errors...at least the one I spot so far.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: MarinFla on October 16, 2012, 08:08:07 AM
It IS DEFINITELY Spiralling White Fly and it is VERY BAD. The Coconut Palms are tall and dripping honeydew on everything. The infestation is spreading to my fruit trees. I need to do something drastic!!

I am thinking soil drench of imidacloprid (commercial strength) and then spray all the trees with malathion. Thoughts?

Someone told me I have to 'inject' the coconut palms to treat them....is this true??

Someone posted a link to commercial imidacloprid ....Murahilin? PJ ? I need it and I should have saved it :(

I am having the same problem with my coconut trees and other trees. I don't think imidacloprid is the way to go though. A strong stream of water will remove the spiraling white fly from your trees. If you add some soap to that strong stream of water it will kill the white flies while also removing them. Then after a few weeks of weekly spraying, when the population has been reduced, you could purchase some beneficial bugs that parasitie spiraling white fly eggs and then your problem could possibly be controlled. Using chemicals like imidacloprid is generally not good for the environment and you should consider trying out alternative safer treatments before you go the systemic pesticide route.

The problem I have  is that the coconut palms are 35-45 ft tall so the hose spray isn't strong enough trying to reach that high. All  the hedges that are on my neighbors property are also now infested and it is too much to eradicate with natural predators. I am worried at how fast the sooty mold completely covered my mango trees and the flies have moved onto my  other healthy fruit trees to cause trouble.
I need to treat this aggressively.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on October 16, 2012, 09:50:16 AM
Not sure what happened to my post from yesterday but, here goes again in a simplified form.

I would use Safari or its generic over Imidacloprid for the spiraling whitefly.  Both Safari and commercial/professional strength  Imidacloprid are available at Howard Fertilizer on Atlantic Avenue in Delray Beach (just east of 441).
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: MarinFla on October 16, 2012, 03:19:56 PM
Not sure what happened to my post from yesterday but, here goes again in a simplified form.

I would use Safari or its generic over Imidacloprid for the spiraling whitefly.  Both Safari and commercial/professional strength  Imidacloprid are available at Howard Fertilizer on Atlantic Avenue in Delray Beach (just east of 441).

Thanks Rob. I am on it. I have our pest guy coming to check my house. The association may pay him to do the hedges but those coconut palms are not in the scope of his association duties. He wanted like $50 to inject each one x3 trees=$150.. For that much I can buy the stuff and treat it myself with a soil drench.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on October 16, 2012, 03:56:57 PM
The Safari will cost you over $300.  The generic will be a little cheaper.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on October 16, 2012, 07:32:06 PM
Hi guys :). I might be annoying, but I still have the same problem on my mango tree, but it got worse. I really don't know what to do...Should I prune it back? I would like to keep the fruits!

Here's some pictures:

This one of the leaves that are affected. It should not be sunburn since it is a the bottom. All my other trees are looking great. The mango tree who is affected is also flushing where it was pug.

(http://i1087.photobucket.com/albums/j469/Samuelforest/DSC04424.jpg)

(http://i1087.photobucket.com/albums/j469/Samuelforest/DSC04423.jpg)

It looks like it is only affected in the back. I have about 20 leaves or more like that.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on October 16, 2012, 07:34:32 PM
Samuel, what you have looks like some cold damage.  Has there been a large swing in temps or humidity for this mango? 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on October 16, 2012, 07:47:27 PM
Not really, it have been indoors for about a month. I think the lowest temperature it have been through was 6 degrees celsius. the humidity is also pretty low, les than 50%.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on October 16, 2012, 08:06:10 PM
6 C is about 42 F and with lowered relative humdity, could cause that kind of damage, especially if the growth was not completely hardened off and had been growing at much higher temps or relative humdity than it is experiencing now. In any case, if it gets no worse, I would not be concerned.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on October 16, 2012, 08:11:43 PM
You think it is caused by too much temperature variation?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on October 16, 2012, 08:14:09 PM
That's my theory. Has it encountered wide temp or humidity swings?  It wold only take one timed correctly to cuase some leaf discoloration.  Could be something else, but I am at a loss to say what else it may be.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on October 16, 2012, 08:18:06 PM
It could have. It might be the variation from outdoors to indoors?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Californiatropicals on October 16, 2012, 11:39:33 PM
Your mango trees that are growing mostly from the roots are doing what almost all grafted mangoes want to do.....that is the rootstock wants to grow from itself rather than supporting the foreign grafted tree above.  If you want to maintain the variety that you purchased the tree for, you best trim off the new growth from the roots.  Otherwise, before long the root sprouts will overtake the tree and the roots will stop sending nutrients to the grafted portion of the tree.  The new tree grown from the roots will be a seedling and its own individual mango with its own characteristics.  Those characterics will likey be substantially inferior to the grafted portion that you purchased the tree for.

Edited for spelling errors...at least the one I spot so far.

Thanks for your response! My concern though is this is not a grafted mango, it is a seedling Manila Mango which are polyembronic..  I wish I could figure out why it's growing from the roots.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 17, 2012, 10:11:35 PM
Samuel,

The leaf underside mis-coloring and drip-tip burning could be from spray damage.   Even soap spray can do this, at too high a concentration or staying wet with spray for too many hours.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 17, 2012, 10:20:53 PM
CaliforniaTropicals,
Did you plant a whole polyembrionic seed there?  Or did you separate out the other plants.  It could be that you have several plants in each pot, which need to be pulled out as weeds.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on October 17, 2012, 10:47:01 PM
Samuel,

The leaf underside mis-coloring and drip-tip burning could be from spray damage.   Even soap spray can do this, at too high a concentration or staying wet with spray for too many hours.
That was my initial thought...posted a page or two back...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: jc on November 03, 2012, 06:08:11 AM
My Valencia Pride, Rosigold, Mahachanok, and Lancetilla are all suffering from some sort of leaf tip "burn" (for lack of an accurate term).  All of the burn is on the second flush or older. 

All were purchased this past summer as 3 gal trees. They were planted in late August / early September.  I have low organic matter, sandy soil that drains well. Soil ph ranges from 6.5 to about 8. Since the summer rains have subsided, I water only when the soil is fairly dry. Well water has a ph of about 6.  I've fertilized once so far with excalibur's 8-3-9 w micros. I have also foliar sprayed once with Southern Ag citrus nutritional spray (no NPK). 

Is the last pic whitefly evidence?

I have a Dot, 2 Pickerings, Beverly, Ice Cream, and a BKM that don't show any symptoms yet. My avocados and carambola are happy and flushing nonstop.

Any suggestions?  Thanks.


Mahachanok
(http://s8.postimage.org/p8acxl4w1/IMAG0441.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/p8acxl4w1/)
Rosigold
(http://s8.postimage.org/dlq8wghkx/IMAG0442.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/dlq8wghkx/)
Rosigold
(http://s8.postimage.org/9qmutvyf5/IMAG0443.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/9qmutvyf5/)
Lancetilla
(http://s8.postimage.org/92e0axzpd/IMAG0444.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/92e0axzpd/)
Lancetilla
(http://s8.postimage.org/x7epsnk01/IMAG0445.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/x7epsnk01/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: OrganicJim on November 03, 2012, 09:16:10 AM
If you do not have many trees as I do and are totally organic use hydrpgen peroxcide on things like this. I use it on U-tips in places and always have a small spray bottle to use.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 03, 2012, 10:39:02 PM
I don't recall seeing signs like that on the first 'Lancetilla' picture.  The others look as though they have been sprayed with soap or oil when the spray took too long to dry.

Has any "Weed n' Feed" been used near there?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: jc on November 04, 2012, 06:06:23 AM
I have sprayed some soap when I found some what looked like spiraling whiteflys. Otherwise, my copper has a sticker that is soapy.

No weed n feed from me, but maybe the landscaping crew.  I'll check into them.  I saw my neighbor spraying his weeds about 2 weeks ago. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: anaxel on November 10, 2012, 03:28:51 PM
Hello to everybody, :D
I have a small problem with my choc anon.
Somebody few to help me to solve this problem, I would not like to lose my mango tree. :-[ :'(
That to make? :-[


(http://s13.postimage.org/7m1aslyhv/P1200869.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/7m1aslyhv/)

(http://s18.postimage.org/wnbefsqph/P1200870.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/wnbefsqph/)

(http://s14.postimage.org/hxzaj7jlp/P1200876.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/hxzaj7jlp/)

(http://s11.postimage.org/lyfjc4urj/P1200877.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/lyfjc4urj/)

Sorry, for the quality of photos.
thank you. ;) 8)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on November 10, 2012, 07:59:49 PM
Took a good look at my mango tree lately and couldn't help but notice that the sooty mold has really taken hold.  My understanding of this is that it is caused by the sticky secretions of aphids, which then turns black from bacteria in the air.  Correct?
Today I decided to take a soft brush and warm water with a squirt of dish detergent and do some clean up.  Pain in the butt to be sure, but the cleaning was effective.  I'd rather not have to do this again, so I'm guessing the issue is to control aphids.  How best to do this?  And for future cleanups, is there an easier way than the old school manual scrubbing I went through today?
Thank you.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on November 10, 2012, 08:10:07 PM
Scale may also cause the sooty mold and not just aphids. The sooty mold grows on the excess carbohydrates caused by the aphids and scale feeding on the leaves.

Aphids and scale are often farmed and protected by ants so if you control the ants you will also be able to control the aphids/scale easier. I control them with the occasional spraying of farm soap. For whitefly I just spray the bottom of the leaves with the hose.

Oh, whitefly will also cause sooty mold. Basically any leaf sucking insect can cause sooty mold because of the excess carbs.

I've found that the sooty mold goes away after a while on its own once you control the insect.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: TnTrobbie on November 10, 2012, 08:17:28 PM
I've found agriculture oil (like Ortho's Volck) to be very effective on mites, ahpids and scale- which inturn eliminates sooty mold in the process. Two consecutive applications, 24hrs apart on both sides of the leaves in the evening when it's cool and preferable not too windy and the pests are good as gone. Dilute per instructions, and apply it using a fine mist, portable pump sprayer....its pretty easy. Used it on my two Sapodillas, NDM, Maha for sooty mold from scale, and some ficus and hedges that had white fly problems (tiny white flies), and it just smothers those suckers and they are dead. The finer the mist/spray the better. I'm really impressed with it and it sells for less than $6.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on November 12, 2012, 08:06:46 AM
I've found agriculture oil (like Ortho's Volck) to be very effective on mites, ahpids and scale- which inturn eliminates sooty mold in the process. Two consecutive applications, 24hrs apart on both sides of the leaves in the evening when it's cool and preferable not too windy and the pests are good as gone. Dilute per instructions, and apply it using a fine mist, portable pump sprayer....its pretty easy. Used it on my two Sapodillas, NDM, Maha for sooty mold from scale, and some ficus and hedges that had white fly problems (tiny white flies), and it just smothers those suckers and they are dead. The finer the mist/spray the better. I'm really impressed with it and it sells for less than $6.
Keep an eye on things as this will not usually act a a cure all.  Also, it does not and will not rid whitefly, ficus or spiraling.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 12, 2012, 09:34:03 AM
The leaves show serious micro-nutrient deficiency.  Add Iron and Manganese and Sulfur.

The black spots look like anthracnose.  Many products are labeled to treat this, including ones containing Copper or Potassium Phosphite.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 12, 2012, 09:41:06 AM
Mealybugs will also contribute to sooty mold.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: anaxel on November 12, 2012, 10:15:42 AM
Hi Guanabanus, :D 8) ;)
 thank you very much to have answered me, I waited for a solution to be able to look after the plant.
I am going to treat leaves and to look after the plante(treat).
thank you all.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Bonakyon on November 22, 2012, 12:17:34 AM
I have a Golden Queen mango seedling that was spouted from seeds that were sent to me from Hong Kong. The seedling started out fine but after about a month one of the young leaves started browning on the edges. After a couple more weeks the other top leaves started browning as well. Now it looks as thought I might lose the plant and I really don’t want to lose this mango tree. I have no clue as to what’s wrong or what to do. I live in the Caribbean, and in my area mango trees grow like weeds… In fact after mango season we have to “mow” the seedling to stop more trees from coming up all over the place. Is this variety different in needs than all other varieties in the Caribbean..? I added a bit of sheep manure to the starter mix but the amount was negligible. After seeing the browning I decided to put the tree in the ground to see if it would fare any better but it seems to be getting worst… what should I do…?



(http://s13.postimage.org/acjwshooz/IMG_20121010_00296.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/acjwshooz/)

(http://s7.postimage.org/wabs85w5z/IMG_20121115_00340.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/wabs85w5z/)

(http://s11.postimage.org/71ibhz5pr/IMG_20121121_00344.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/71ibhz5pr/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on November 24, 2012, 08:09:19 AM
Hard to really say what is going on with your seedling with any certainty.  I would consider several things.  First I note that the problem is with the new growth and not the older established growth.  I have seen new growth burn off with wind and temperature issues, but that would presumably not be your issue in your location. I suppose wind heavily laden with salt could cause this type of burn.  I don't think it is a root problem as that would affect all the leaves and not the newer ones only.  Manure can burn a plant and even in small quantities, cause damage. That could be the issue. I have also seen new growth burn off with lack of water.  Has the water supply been constant.  My experience with mangoes is that in warmer climates, the more water the better.  I'd would wash the manure away from the roots and water heavily.  The plant should respond unless there is something else going on.  If there is something else going on, I am sorry to say I don't know what it would be nor how you would treat it.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Charlie23 on December 01, 2012, 10:36:10 AM
noticed several leaves got some black powdery stuff, and even spread to branches.... any idea?  Fungicide spread works?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: TnTrobbie on December 01, 2012, 11:14:22 AM
Sooty mold. A result of insects that secrete sugary substance. Volck agri oil can kill suffocate the insects, thus ridding of the sooty mold. Or sulfur fungicide application. Do either when it is cool outside (evenings).
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 01, 2012, 10:55:54 PM
Yes.  Just be sure not to mix sulfur and oil, and don't even spray them within three weeks of each other.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: BestDay on December 04, 2012, 06:18:51 PM
Help out a new guy and tell me what this is.  There is scale here that I think is dead but there is also what looks like fungus or mold.

Thanks
Bill

(http://i1145.photobucket.com/albums/o518/BestDay23/Rosigold12-3-12.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on December 04, 2012, 07:00:01 PM
looks like Flight why or Bealy mugs.

I'm sorry, white fly or mealy bugs.

quite a few sap sucking insects produce a white waxy substance to deter predators.

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Rtreid on December 04, 2012, 07:13:02 PM
It is hard to tell from the photo, but it looks as if it could be wooly whitefly or mealybug.  If there are small white flying insects around, then it might be whitefly. If there are any hibiscus plants around this tree take a look at them as they are a magnet for the wooly whitefly.  If the spots on the plants look like soft many legged buggers then they are likely to be mealybug. The two spots on the upper part of the right hand branch do look a lot like scale.

Richard
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: TREESNMORE on December 04, 2012, 07:21:55 PM
Spray with oil looks like scale
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on December 04, 2012, 07:31:13 PM
Darn you Mods  :-*, I had just made a post when you switched to this thread and my post was lost...third time today  >:( >:(  :blank:

Being the leaves look clean, I would say no to it being whitefly.  As this is a pretty bad infestation, I would use something a little more potent than an oil.  While I know some of you do not like or believe in pesticides and also think oil is a cure all,,,I am not one of those people.  Sometimes you need to use something with a little power behind it.

Oh, I would also isolate this tree from the rest of your plants/trees till you have this infestation well under control.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on December 05, 2012, 09:06:02 AM
Yes.  Just be sure not to mix sulfur and oil, and don't even spray them within three weeks of each other.

Why is that?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 05, 2012, 08:30:37 PM
Leaf burn.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: tropical66 on December 06, 2012, 01:25:46 AM


    Please read this article

    http://www.jbiopest.com/users/LW8/efiles/Vol_5_0_72_76F.pdf (http://www.jbiopest.com/users/LW8/efiles/Vol_5_0_72_76F.pdf)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on December 14, 2012, 07:20:55 PM
My mango tree lost 10 leaves this week! It has some new growth, but some of it wilts and dies... What should I do?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomandan on December 14, 2012, 11:46:14 PM
This morning I noticed a lot of leaves on an otherwise robust young CC mango tree have a bronzed look to them.
Any idea what this might be?   I usually go with benign neglect unless a problem seems serious.  But I don't want this to spread to other trees if I can avoid it.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on December 15, 2012, 12:01:53 AM
pictures people, please post pictures so we can help you...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on December 15, 2012, 08:54:38 AM
pictures people, please post pictures so we can help you...

Pictures? To help diagnose a plant problem? I've never heard of such a thing.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomandan on December 15, 2012, 09:11:45 AM
Sorry.  I'll try to post pics when I get home Sun night or Monday.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on December 15, 2012, 02:08:57 PM
I just discovered that my tree had root rot... :( I repotted it in the gritty mix. I hope it will survive.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 15, 2012, 08:39:53 PM
Mangomandan,

Thrips is a common problem under mango leaves in cool weather.  The leaves often look bronzed and then burnt.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomandan on December 16, 2012, 07:07:48 PM
Thanks, Har.  I'll do some googling to learn about thrips.

Meanwhile I can post pics of the affected Coco Cream and Lemon Zest.
(http://s9.postimage.org/n2mhlu1uz/also_Coconut_Cream.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/n2mhlu1uz/)

(http://s9.postimage.org/qaqyyvo4r/Coco_Cream.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/qaqyyvo4r/)

(http://s9.postimage.org/3nbpsq8kr/Lemon_Zest.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/3nbpsq8kr/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on December 16, 2012, 09:02:32 PM
My Cogshall has the same appearance.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on December 24, 2012, 02:38:32 PM
DELETED
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on December 24, 2012, 02:56:39 PM
Yes it is, it only means that flowering signal wasn't big enough. I mean the variation of temperature that introduced blooms.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on December 24, 2012, 03:15:12 PM
My nam doc mai, which for the past 7 years has been green leafed and beautiful, started to look badly this year starting around August. Is this powdery mildew? On some leaves, it looks like it has a nutrient deficiency, but it's planted in giant compost pit and has never shown signs of deficiency like this.

(http://s14.postimage.org/fx911yffx/DSC01216.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/fx911yffx/)

(http://s8.postimage.org/6pmo9oskx/DSC01217.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/6pmo9oskx/)

(http://s13.postimage.org/txk6abz6b/DSC01218.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/txk6abz6b/)

(http://s7.postimage.org/4a3gio87b/DSC01219.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/4a3gio87b/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on December 24, 2012, 05:09:07 PM
Thanks, Har.  I'll do some googling to learn about thrips.

Meanwhile I can post pics of the affected Coco Cream and Lemon Zest.
([url]http://s9.postimage.org/n2mhlu1uz/also_Coconut_Cream.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/n2mhlu1uz/[/url])

([url]http://s9.postimage.org/qaqyyvo4r/Coco_Cream.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/qaqyyvo4r/[/url])

([url]http://s9.postimage.org/3nbpsq8kr/Lemon_Zest.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/3nbpsq8kr/[/url])


Strange combination of symptoms, but I don't think there is anything to worry about.  Something is eating and something has burned the leaves.  Either way, it'll rebound without any problem.  Could the burn have occurred from lack of water and windy conditions?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on December 25, 2012, 09:39:00 AM
Yes it is, it only means that flowering signal wasn't big enough. I mean the variation of temperature that introduced blooms.
?????
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on December 25, 2012, 09:43:46 AM
My nam doc mai, which for the past 7 years has been green leafed and beautiful, started to look badly this year starting around August. Is this powdery mildew? On some leaves, it looks like it has a nutrient deficiency, but it's planted in giant compost pit and has never shown signs of deficiency like this.

([url]http://s14.postimage.org/fx911yffx/DSC01216.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/fx911yffx/[/url])

([url]http://s8.postimage.org/6pmo9oskx/DSC01217.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/6pmo9oskx/[/url])

([url]http://s13.postimage.org/txk6abz6b/DSC01218.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/txk6abz6b/[/url])

([url]http://s7.postimage.org/4a3gio87b/DSC01219.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/4a3gio87b/[/url])

do not see any signs of powdery mildew, which usually occurs in the cooler months.  I have, however, seen damage similar to that but do not have any answers.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on December 25, 2012, 10:17:52 AM
That looks like potassium deficiency.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on December 25, 2012, 12:14:20 PM
The strange thing is that I've been giving it 0-0-50, and this is the first year that it's done this. It did seem to start not long after pruning, so I wonder if it's some sort of bacterial or fungal infection.

That looks like potassium deficiency.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on December 25, 2012, 12:23:47 PM
Yes it is, it only means that flowering signal wasn't big enough. I mean the variation of temperature that introduced blooms.
?????

What SamuelForest said is correct. The half bloom half leaf growth is usually a result of temperature changes. I've posted links to books and articles that explained the process a few times in other posts.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on December 25, 2012, 02:33:51 PM
The strange thing is that I've been giving it 0-0-50, and this is the first year that it's done this. It did seem to start not long after pruning, so I wonder if it's some sort of bacterial or fungal infection.

That looks like potassium deficiency.

Ya, bacterial infections can exhibit similar symptoms.

Time to send out the Har signal! I'm sure he doesn't have better things to be doing on Christmas ;)

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 25, 2012, 11:03:22 PM
Cookiemonster,

Powdery mildew.  The cool temperature requirement for growth of Powdery Mildew is 76 degrees Fahrenheit or below.

Appears deficient in Magnesium and possibly in Zinc.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on December 26, 2012, 07:07:19 AM
Powdery Mildew also tends to occur in the Spring.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vh048 (http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vh048)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mike T on December 26, 2012, 07:28:49 AM
Telling a nutrient deficiency from leaves is quite easy with some of the tables of ID pictures around.Old leaves showing symptoms,young leaves showing symptoms,yellow veins or interveinal yellowing, general yellowing,bunching small  or yellow veins etc can let you pick which nutrients are deficient.Secondary deficiencies induced by excess of one nutrient in fertilizer and multiple deficiencies are hard to pick. Excesses and toxicities can also be hard to identify and seperate from some diseases.Excess chlorides burn leaf edges and especially tips and excess Na bronzes leaves and these are easy excesses to identify..
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on December 26, 2012, 12:05:32 PM
Thanks, Har. I had a feeling it was powdery mildew. Can I just wait it out, or do I need to treat with dreaded sulfur?

Cookiemonster,

Powdery mildew.  The cool temperature requirement for growth of Powdery Mildew is 76 degrees Fahrenheit or below.

Appears deficient in Magnesium and possibly in Zinc.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropicdude on December 26, 2012, 01:05:01 PM
Thanks, Har. I had a feeling it was powdery mildew. Can I just wait it out, or do I need to treat with dreaded sulfur?

Cookiemonster,

Powdery mildew.  The cool temperature requirement for growth of Powdery Mildew is 76 degrees Fahrenheit or below.

Appears deficient in Magnesium and possibly in Zinc.

I am noticing a few leaves with Powdery Mildew again, I seem to get it during this time of year on a couple of my mango trees, , when temps cool down a bit.  in the summer it tends to clear up.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bangkok on December 28, 2012, 02:12:03 AM
Does anybody know what this is and how i can control it?

I think it is the mealy bug because i see the ants near them all the time but this kills my small mangofruits and whole flowers.

I sprayed neem oil with Spruzzit and dishwashingsoap  allready some days ago but it is still there. What is a better way to get rid of it?


(http://s13.postimage.org/t742rmswz/mangoflower.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/t742rmswz/)

(http://s8.postimage.org/mxzv7tddd/mangotree.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/mxzv7tddd/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 28, 2012, 11:43:20 PM
Bangkok,
It looks like powdery mildew on your mango blossoms, not mealy bug.  So you need a curative fungicide.  Make sure the label doesn't forbid spraying on open blooms (full flower).

Cookie Monster.
Sulfur is fine when temperatures won't be above about 80 degrees Fahrenheit.  Make sure that you haven't sprayed oil within the last three weeks, and don't spray oil for three or four weeks after sulfur.

Or you might try Plant Doctor, which is labeled for anthracnose on mangos and for powdery mildew on other plants.  ??

Insecticidal soap also kills hyphae of powdery mildew when it is applied when they are actively growing.

Presence of enough oil to repel water also prevents powdery mildew growth.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bangkok on December 29, 2012, 06:59:08 AM
Then powdery mildew can even grow in the full sun here in Bangkok. I will spray something because it ruined many flowers allready.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: jc on December 29, 2012, 09:42:11 AM
Any ideas as to what this cayenne pepper looking stuff is?  It's on my Rosigold, Lancetilla, and Lula avocado leaves.  Smears easily and looks like wet rust streaks.

How can I get rid of it?

(http://s9.postimage.org/kkc3fv96z/IMAG0480.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/kkc3fv96z/)

(http://s13.postimage.org/jgtcq3g9v/IMAG0481.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/jgtcq3g9v/)

(http://s7.postimage.org/pz7gd259j/IMAG0482.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/pz7gd259j/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropicalgrower89 on December 29, 2012, 02:04:18 PM
Red spider mites. I just give the tree a good soak of water since the spider mites hate water and moisture.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on December 30, 2012, 09:46:19 AM
I would go with something just a little stronger than H2O.  Volck oil should rid the tree of mites.  Just keep in mind of any sulfur application if/when spraying oil.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on December 31, 2012, 02:25:15 PM
This is the only tree in my yard which has this:  Lemon Zest

Please Help!

(http://i1112.photobucket.com/albums/k495/nsobgyn/001-6.jpg)

(http://i1112.photobucket.com/albums/k495/nsobgyn/002-6.jpg)

(http://i1112.photobucket.com/albums/k495/nsobgyn/003-5.jpg)

(http://i1112.photobucket.com/albums/k495/nsobgyn/004-5.jpg)

(http://i1112.photobucket.com/albums/k495/nsobgyn/005-3.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropicdude on December 31, 2012, 06:36:18 PM
Does the white rub off ? or is it lack of chlorophyll in the leaf cells. ?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 31, 2012, 09:09:46 PM
Mites.  See above.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on December 31, 2012, 10:03:45 PM
Thanks. High temp supposed to be 79 tommorrow. Too warm for oil? Anything else effective?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on January 01, 2013, 11:10:22 AM
On hardened mango leaves any temperature below 80 Fahrenheit should be OK to spray heavy dormant oil like Volck Oil.  Some of the highly refined light summer oils can be sprayed on hardened mango leaves even above 90 degrees.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on January 02, 2013, 09:35:06 AM
On hardened mango leaves any temperature below 80 Fahrenheit should be OK to spray heavy dormant oil like Volck Oil.  Some of the highly refined light summer oils can be sprayed on hardened mango leaves even above 90 degrees.

sprayed the entire tree yesterday- does this need to be repeated?  thanks
Nat
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on January 02, 2013, 09:44:21 PM
When you see live mites walking around, spray again.  Preferably before they have had time to lay eggs.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: jc on January 06, 2013, 10:35:00 PM
Red spider mites. I just give the tree a good soak of water since the spider mites hate water and moisture.
I would go with something just a little stronger than H2O.  Volck oil should rid the tree of mites.  Just keep in mind of any sulfur application if/when spraying oil.

Thanks for the diagnosis and treatment options.  Picked up some Organocide 3 in 1, gonna give it shot. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropicdude on January 24, 2013, 08:26:08 PM
Been wanting to get these up, I have a problem with a few of my potted mango trees, hope someone can identify the problem.

I have looked at probably a hundred photos online of mango problems but cannot seem to pin down one that looks similar, closest I could find was a sulfur deficiency.

notice that the chlorosis is not just between the veins, its patchy randomly scattered , although it seems to concentrate  towards the outer part of the leaf away from the stem.   also,  doesn't seem to matter if leaf is new or old.   My lemon Zest, Coconut Cream, and Maha Chanok have similar conditions.  although the MC is only slight.  the rest of my mangoes are ok.

Coconut Cream
(http://i1239.photobucket.com/albums/ff510/William_Crowley/DSCI1308_zpsd20c8efd.jpg)

Close up
(http://i1239.photobucket.com/albums/ff510/William_Crowley/DSCI1309_zps4fcb5afa.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on January 25, 2013, 07:48:26 PM
I don't know.

Possibilities:  chemical exposure (herbicide), virus, and perhaps sunburn.  In case it is viral, sanitize clippers after use on these plants.
It might also be light damage from mites or thrips or lacebugs.

I don't see Sulfur deficiency.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropicdude on January 25, 2013, 09:51:03 PM
I don't know.

Possibilities:  chemical exposure (herbicide), virus, and perhaps sunburn.  In case it is viral, sanitize clippers after use on these plants.
It might also be light damage from mites or thrips or lacebugs.

I don't see Sulfur deficiency.

I do not use herbicide, except for neem on occasion, but not on this plant,  usually the citrus, and the bigger tree that has a bit of powdery mildew and those trees do not have this.  something microscopic maybe. or something that came then went.  in the same picture you can see a small Kesar just below, that one is healthy as can be.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Herman on February 27, 2013, 11:38:59 PM
Hello mango experts!  The "new" leaves on my mallika mango has been yellow since it flushed in December 2012, and still has not turned green.  Also, it started as yellow-green instead of the red I see in other pics around the internet.  Is this normal or is it some deficiency?  Also I watered it this morning and when I came home from work I noticed some browning at the tips of the new leaves.  I have attached pics.

Thanks for your help!

Herman

(http://s22.postimage.org/rzyl3svst/IMAG0712.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/rzyl3svst/)

(http://s18.postimage.org/5xzupdq1x/IMAG0713.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/5xzupdq1x/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on February 28, 2013, 07:54:19 AM
Definitely a mineral deficiency.  I never know, by the color and mottling of the leaf alone, which of the mineral(s) it is missing.  I would apply a time released, balanced fertilizer containing minor elements and see how it responds.  What kind of soil are using and what type of fertilizer are you using? Har (Guanabanas) is much better than me at deciphering the look of the particular mineral lacking by the look of the leaf.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 28, 2013, 10:37:36 AM
Harry is right, as it does look like a multiple deficiency, presumably including of Iron and Potassium, and possibly Nitrogen, Sulfur, Magnesium, Zinc, Manganese....
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomandan on February 28, 2013, 12:21:15 PM
Are there good fungicide options available in Florida for mango trees?   The Organocide Plant Doctor doesn't seem to be helping my Dot this year, and it rains every single time I apply copper.

I'm finally beginning to understand the wisdom of choosing cultivars that are more resistant to anthracnose.

So, have any of the following varieties been around long enough to give some idea of their relative resistance to anthracnose?

Angie, Coconut Cream, Lemon Zest, Maha Chanok, Po Pyu Kalay, or Spirit of 76
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on February 28, 2013, 01:30:33 PM
it rains every single time I apply copper

Tell me about it......
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on February 28, 2013, 01:30:58 PM
I'm finally beginning to understand the wisdom of choosing cultivars that are more resistant to anthracnose.
So, have any of the following varieties been around long enough to give some idea of their relative resistance to anthracnose?

Angie, Coconut Cream, Lemon Zest, Maha Chanok, Po Pyu Kalay, or Spirit of 76

Maha Chanok, PPK and Angie all have excellent resistance.

Spirit of 76 I would classify as average fungal resistance.

Coconut Cream I can't comment yet, but my small tree has tried to set fruit and they have not demonstrated good holding power so far....but the jury is out (at least it has bloomed and is blooming again).

Lemon Zest.....no blooms on two trees.  The tree itself seems highly susceptible to black sooty mold so I am very skeptical about its overall fungal resistance.

Stay tuned for further updates.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomandan on February 28, 2013, 01:41:11 PM


Maha Chanok, PPK and Angie all have excellent resistance.



Thanks, Harry. It sounds like I will eventually have some tasty mangos at my disposal.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: puglvr1 on February 28, 2013, 02:12:09 PM
"Are there good fungicide options available in Florida for mango trees?   The Organocide Plant Doctor doesn't seem to be helping my Dot this year, and it rains every single time I apply copper."


Dan, how often are you spraying the Dot mango tree...I was reading the directions for mango trees on the Plant Doctor and it says:

"Spray tree every 14 days
during blossom period, then
monthly until harvest."

Wasn't sure...but, it sounds a little excessive and didn't want to apply it that often? Afraid of the long term affects. Any thoughts?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on February 28, 2013, 02:54:28 PM
I have never heard of being resistant to sooty mold as sooty mold is a byproduct of actual pests, whether on the specific plant or on some other plant not an actual fungus that is attacking the plant.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on February 28, 2013, 03:23:20 PM
You never heard of it?  Probably with good reason.  I may have partially mis-spoke......or mis-stated what I was trying to communicate. 
Black sooty mold is, for sure,  a by product of pests.  In my yard it seems some trees have a perennial problem with it.  So is it that the pests like that tree more than others and so there is more sooty mold on the selected trees?  I imagine most of my trees have the same issues with pests due to their close proximity.  Yet, many do not seem to have an issue with black sooty mold.  So how would I better say what I have observed?  Lemon Zest seems highly susceptible to the insects that bring about black sooty mold?   Is that better? Bottom line, for newly planted trees, there is a wicked case of black sooty mold on both of my Lemon Zest trees, while there is none on many other trees contemporaneously planted.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomandan on February 28, 2013, 06:43:23 PM


Dan, how often are you spraying the Dot mango tree...I was reading the directions for mango trees on the Plant Doctor and it says:

"Spray tree every 14 days
during blossom period, then
monthly until harvest."

Wasn't sure...but, it sounds a little excessive and didn't want to apply it that often? Afraid of the long term affects. Any thoughts?

I have sprayed it on the Dot every two weeks, more or less.  I've been assuming that it's harmless, at least compared to some of the popular/effective fungicides from the olden days. The limited Googling I've done on Plant Doctor and another brand with the same stuff in it has not turned up any negative long-term effects.  (But then I thought copper was utterly benign until I read otherwise on the forum.)

 But the small fruit on Dot are quite speckled, so I started with copper recently on the whole tree, which has some new blossoms.  As I said, the weather has dampened my enthusiasm for non-systemic fungicides.

I only started with the Plant Doctor last year, so don't have an overall sense of how effective it is.  However, it does at least seem that the Plant Doctor got rid of powdery mildew on Rosigold both last year and this year.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on February 28, 2013, 07:49:15 PM
Some trees do seem to be more highly favored by scale, lemon zest being one. I think it has to do with a couple of factors: 0) how 'sweet' the sap is and 1) how slowly the tree grows. I theorize that scale likes sweet sap and slow growing trees. Amount of sunlight also influences severity of scale problem (but the underlying cause could potentially be slow growth due to lack of sunlight). My glenn only gets sooty mold only on the north side every winter.

That said, I've seen lemon zest trees with and without sooty mold issues -- probably a factor of how established and therefore how fast it grows.

However, they seem to be fairly resistant to anthracnose. I'll see if I can take some snaps of my LZ flowers and fruit.

I have a cute little 1gallon LZ that's starting to flower at about 18 inches tall :-)

You never heard of it?  Probably with good reason.  I may have partially mis-spoke......or mis-stated what I was trying to communicate. 
Black sooty mold is, for sure,  a by product of pests.  In my yard it seems some trees have a perennial problem with it.  So is it that the pests like that tree more than others and so there is more sooty mold on the selected trees?  I imagine most of my trees have the same issues with pests due to their close proximity.  Yet, many do not seem to have an issue with black sooty mold.  So how would I better say what I have observed?  Lemon Zest seems highly susceptible to the insects that bring about black sooty mold?   Is that better? Bottom line, for newly planted trees, there is a wicked case of black sooty mold on both of my Lemon Zest trees, while there is none on many other trees contemporaneously planted.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: DuncanYoung on February 28, 2013, 07:59:19 PM
it rains every single time I apply copper

Tell me about it......

Maybe change it up and spray the copper after it rains  :)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomandan on February 28, 2013, 11:06:40 PM
Dang!  I guess I should have read the label.....  ;D
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: puglvr1 on March 01, 2013, 12:49:31 PM
Thanks Dan!! Good luck with your Dot  :)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Herman on March 01, 2013, 10:08:58 PM
Harry is right, as it does look like a multiple deficiency, presumably including of Iron and Potassium, and possibly Nitrogen, Sulfur, Magnesium, Zinc, Manganese....

Thanks Harry and Har!  Yeah, so I do foliar spray chelated iron, zinc, calcium, magnesium, as well as dynagro foliage pro once every week, alternating.  I also give it epsom salt when I water the roots along with dynamite all purpose fert.  The soil is just what came with it from the nursery.  I have not repotted it yet.  Now I did add some bonemeal last year, but I think I added too much of it.  Perhaps there is nutrient lockout?

Thanks!

Herman
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 02, 2013, 09:49:46 PM
If you are really going to spray this often, the dosage should be very light.  Sometimes you could just use seaweed extract/kelp, in your alternating program.  This would guarantee the various trace elements.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on March 03, 2013, 02:10:05 PM
elp! What the hack is this? Is this just a super severe iron deficiency? Younger leaves are most affected.

(http://s7.postimage.org/wuo0l1ih3/DSC01425.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/wuo0l1ih3/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 03, 2013, 10:28:39 PM
Not an Iron deficiency.

I don't know what it is.  It is very strange to see healthy green at margins and paled out veins.

In Iron deficiency the veins are the last parts to lose their green.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mario on March 03, 2013, 10:33:31 PM

(http://s12.postimage.org/dx5wr6u7d/20130303_115321.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/dx5wr6u7d/)
What could this be?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on March 04, 2013, 12:42:47 AM
elp! What the hack is this? Is this just a super severe iron deficiency? Younger leaves are most affected.

([url]http://s7.postimage.org/wuo0l1ih3/DSC01425.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/wuo0l1ih3/[/url])

Anything on the underside?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on March 04, 2013, 12:46:16 AM

([url]http://s12.postimage.org/dx5wr6u7d/20130303_115321.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/dx5wr6u7d/[/url])
What could this be?

That could be iron deficiency.  What are you fertilizing with?  Looks like it could use a proper fert program, including a good minor element foliar spray. What is the composition of the soil it is in?  It looks like its filled of a lot of rock...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 04, 2013, 09:33:40 AM
Mario,

Zinc deficiency and Iron deficiency, and probably other deficiencies.  As BSBullie recommends, give it good mixed granular fertilizer plus foliar nutritional spray.

Also do a soil drench with Sequestrene 138 or with Ferrilene.  Use several light doses, a week or two apart, as one can easily cause damage with too much iron.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mario on March 04, 2013, 11:26:29 AM
Ok will do that. I purchased the tree like this from hd. Its on a clay type doil,ofcourse i amended the soil
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on March 04, 2013, 01:01:05 PM
Thanks for your input, Har. That's what's confusing me too. This year in particular I've been seeing several trees in my neighborhood with that problem. It's also photo-affected; the shaded out portions of the leaf get it less. This morning, Dr Campbell said that he thinks it could be severe iron deficiency. I'm going to go ahead and try an iron drench.

Not an Iron deficiency.

I don't know what it is.  It is very strange to see healthy green at margins and paled out veins.

In Iron deficiency the veins are the last parts to lose their green.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: jc on March 05, 2013, 06:40:37 PM
My little Angie definitely needs some micronutrients. Do you think its safe to give it a spritz?  I was thinking of mixing a 1/2 strength batch of chelated micros in a spray bottle.  Yea, nay?


(http://s10.postimage.org/d4gbik42d/Image1.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/d4gbik42d/)

(http://s10.postimage.org/c3g2tfn2t/Image2.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/c3g2tfn2t/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on March 05, 2013, 07:14:05 PM
Yea!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: DuncanYoung on March 05, 2013, 07:54:52 PM
Yea, and a pinch of osmocote will help as well.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on March 05, 2013, 08:16:51 PM
If it were me, I'd just give it an osmocote equivalent with minors. Iron doesn't absorb very well through the leaves, so you're better off putting it in the soil (via osmocote). Wouldn't hurt anything to spray though.

Looks like a pine island graft.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: jc on March 05, 2013, 09:12:03 PM
Ok cool. I've never used osmocote. I have had some good success with chelated foliars though.  I'll have to look for osmocote w micros.

No idea whose label is on the tree, but I got it a couple of weeks ago from Mike Bender. Coincidently, Mike now works for PIN.  ???
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on March 05, 2013, 09:44:27 PM
I think Home Cheapo and Lows both carry Dynamite timed release with minors.

Ok cool. I've never used osmocote. I have had some good success with chelated foliars though.  I'll have to look for osmocote w micros.

No idea whose label is on the tree, but I got it a couple of weeks ago from Mike Bender. Coincidently, Mike now works for PIN.  ???
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: jc on March 05, 2013, 09:57:41 PM
Thank you fine Sir.

Love the new avatar. Priceless!!!

I think Home Cheapo and Lows both carry Dynamite timed release with minors.

Ok cool. I've never used osmocote. I have had some good success with chelated foliars though.  I'll have to look for osmocote w micros.

No idea whose label is on the tree, but I got it a couple of weeks ago from Mike Bender. Coincidently, Mike now works for PIN.  ???
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: DuncanYoung on March 05, 2013, 10:17:33 PM
Bonide Iron Drench, has all your minors, applied as a soil drench, along with osmocote granules should perk it right up.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on March 06, 2013, 08:48:56 PM
HAHAHAHA Thanks :-)

Thank you fine Sir.

Love the new avatar. Priceless!!!

I think Home Cheapo and Lows both carry Dynamite timed release with minors.

Ok cool. I've never used osmocote. I have had some good success with chelated foliars though.  I'll have to look for osmocote w micros.

No idea whose label is on the tree, but I got it a couple of weeks ago from Mike Bender. Coincidently, Mike now works for PIN.  ???
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on March 06, 2013, 08:51:43 PM
I got another input from Dr Crane -- who believes it to be solarization, where cold temps and high light cause cell damage. Interesting. It must be a combination of iron deficiency and solarization.

elp! What the hack is this? Is this just a super severe iron deficiency? Younger leaves are most affected.

([url]http://s7.postimage.org/wuo0l1ih3/DSC01425.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimage.org/image/wuo0l1ih3/[/url])
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on March 06, 2013, 08:54:01 PM
Dr. Crane is on point!  You are smart to get his input!!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on March 06, 2013, 09:18:19 PM
I thought Dr. Crane was a ficticious sitcom character.  You mean Frasier was really a doctor?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on March 06, 2013, 09:19:43 PM
:-) He's pretty dang smarty pants ain't he. I figured between the 3 gurus (Har, Dr Crane, and Dr Campbell) I'd get a pretty good diagnosis :-).

Dr. Crane is on point!  You are smart to get his input!!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mario on March 20, 2013, 08:06:09 PM
I planted this tree about 3weeks ago and it seems to be doing good i would think but it has some leaves that are looking like this.any ideas?
(http://s21.postimage.org/n1h1p9e83/20130320_165609.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/n1h1p9e83/)

(http://s4.postimage.org/qwhgg8ugp/20130320_165616.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/qwhgg8ugp/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on March 20, 2013, 08:25:33 PM
Would need to see the condition of the entire tree, but that leaf looks indicative of normal spring leaf drop, where older leaves yellow and drop.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mario on March 20, 2013, 08:28:47 PM
Would need to see the condition of the entire tree, but that leaf looks indicative of normal spring leaf drop, where older leaves yellow and drop.


(http://s11.postimage.org/thw67noq7/20130320_172655.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/thw67noq7/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 20, 2013, 10:32:34 PM
Correct.  Old leaves drop during new growth flush, especially during dry weather.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mario on March 20, 2013, 11:06:32 PM
Thanks so much. Now i can stay calm
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Californiatropicals on March 22, 2013, 10:56:11 PM
Hello all, I was hoping to take advantage of the knowledge of some of the mango experts in here.. I wanted to know if this is a deficiency ?

(http://i1243.photobucket.com/albums/gg545/dvaldez1286/mangoleaf_zps8de7a51d.jpg)

I just drenched and foliar fed today with Ironite plus ( best I could find) has chelated iron, zinc, magnesium, and boron.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 23, 2013, 10:34:36 PM
Severe Manganese deficiency.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Californiatropicals on March 23, 2013, 11:21:09 PM
Severe Manganese deficiency.

thanks for your response! Maganese or magnesium? What is a good way to provide it??
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: jc on March 25, 2013, 08:55:00 PM
This is my neighbor's coconut cream. It looks pretty bad any ideas?  Fertilizer burn and ?



(http://s21.postimg.cc/ki48xj3pv/image.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/ki48xj3pv/)

(http://s23.postimg.cc/ivjmq1h2f/image.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/ivjmq1h2f/)

(http://s3.postimg.cc/58irvpsb3/image.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/58irvpsb3/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FRUITBOXHERO on March 25, 2013, 09:05:32 PM
Does anyone know what this bug is and if its a good bug or should start killing them
(http://s7.postimg.cc/6q5jzu2rb/image.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/6q5jzu2rb/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: zands on March 25, 2013, 09:16:55 PM
good he/she/it  is spreading pollen around........pollinating    People are saying he is harmful....I'll take a closer look
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Seadation on March 25, 2013, 09:57:24 PM
I have been killing them I am pretty sure those beetles are bad and they eat the baby mangos. Search Asian Mango Flower Beetle
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: JeffDM on March 25, 2013, 10:19:23 PM
I'm not an expert, but that thing looks like it's related to my ex-wife.
You guys in Florida sure have a lot of bugs.
First thing I noticed when I moved to San Diego 40+ years ago was the absence of bugs - in warm weather, we can leave the sliding glass door out to our patio open all day without the screen.  Only have to close the screen door at night when the inside lights attract moths.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FRUITBOXHERO on March 25, 2013, 10:50:08 PM
They are also on the leaves of the tree, it's an odd looking beetle and it flys pretty damn good. I'll post some pics of the leaves it is eating (or I think he's eating it) just the edge of the leafs are eaten
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on March 26, 2013, 12:13:52 AM
I think fertilizer burn.

This is my neighbor's coconut cream. It looks pretty bad any ideas?  Fertilizer burn and ?



([url]http://s21.postimg.cc/ki48xj3pv/image.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/ki48xj3pv/[/url])

([url]http://s23.postimg.cc/ivjmq1h2f/image.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/ivjmq1h2f/[/url])

([url]http://s3.postimg.cc/58irvpsb3/image.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/58irvpsb3/[/url])
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 26, 2013, 12:14:16 AM
Magnesium deficiency.

The tip burn may be from an episode of water-logging, from excess sea salt, or fertilizer burn.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Dangermouse01 on March 26, 2013, 05:29:15 AM
Euphoria sepulcralis
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/IN/IN75000.pdf (http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/IN/IN75000.pdf)

DM
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: jc on March 26, 2013, 06:35:27 AM
Thanks, Har!

Magnesium deficiency.

The tip burn may be from an episode of water-logging, from excess sea salt, or fertilizer burn.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: jc on March 26, 2013, 06:43:28 AM
Found some on my trees.

Another lovely gift from the East. Hopefully the lizards like them.  ???
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: zands on March 26, 2013, 07:19:09 AM
I'm not an expert, but that thing looks like it's related to my ex-wife.
You guys in Florida sure have a lot of bugs.
First thing I noticed when I moved to San Diego 40+ years ago was the absence of bugs - in warm weather, we can leave the sliding glass door out to our patio open all day without the screen.  Only have to close the screen door at night when the inside lights attract moths.

Humid climates means more bugs, more fungus, more plant diseases. Much of California commercial agriculture is done in dry areas that water is brought to. It depends on this irrigation. So commercial growers in California can cut back on pesticides...at least that's my theory.

In Florida our water comes from the sky. In California you have to bring the water to the tree or other plant
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on March 26, 2013, 10:45:24 AM
HAHAHAHAHA

I'm not an expert, but that thing looks like it's related to my ex-wife.
You guys in Florida sure have a lot of bugs.
First thing I noticed when I moved to San Diego 40+ years ago was the absence of bugs - in warm weather, we can leave the sliding glass door out to our patio open all day without the screen.  Only have to close the screen door at night when the inside lights attract moths.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropicdude on March 27, 2013, 02:22:13 AM
Euphoria sepulcralis
[url]http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/IN/IN75000.pdf[/url] ([url]http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/IN/IN75000.pdf[/url])

DM


I see he is a bad guy for sure.   almost looks like the nasty fellow that was nibbling on my mangosteen roots, except he had smooth shell, not this Klingon forehead looking beetle.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: rusahlynn on March 28, 2013, 05:07:11 PM
I need help with my mango, but can't seem to get my pictures to post :( I used the "add image to post" button, and upload my picture, but it won't copy anything to here. I am on a different forum that uses the exact same system of posting pictures and it works just fine there...what am I missing?!

My issue with my little mango plant (approximately 8" tall) is that the leaves are curling and brown, and it's tiny trunk has split in one spot. Also, some leaves came off and there's a "scab" (for lack of a better word) where they were, does this prevent new growth? (It happened on the sides and the top, there were three tiny (1/2") leaves coming out the top, and they got knocked off :( ) it was planted last June, and grew well until about 4 months ago, and hasn't grown at all since. (Besides those three leaves that got knocked off a couple weeks ago). I do live in Canada, and we have very cold winters, but it's been in a pot in my (cool) house the whole time. Any idea on why it could be going brown? (And I realize its hard to tell without photos)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 28, 2013, 09:59:14 PM
Extremely low air humidity could be stressing the leaves.

There could be a nutritional deficiency, such as not enough Potassium.

There could be microscopic bud-mites.  Or thrips.

There could be powdery mildew if the air in the house is ever of high humidity and cool.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: rusahlynn on March 29, 2013, 12:22:44 AM
Extremely low air humidity could be stressing the leaves.

There could be a nutritional deficiency, such as not enough Potassium.

There could be microscopic bud-mites.  Or thrips.

There could be powdery mildew if the air in the house is ever of high humidity and cool.

How could I tell which it is? And I looked, and there is tiny specks of white stuff on the backs of the leaves, would that be bugs? If so, how would I get rid of them?
And I have no idea if its humid or not in my house....generally the area I live in is quite dry...but my house might be more humid...but I don't think so.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: rusahlynn on April 01, 2013, 04:05:37 PM
Last year my sister planted a mango seed from a store bought mango (so I have no idea what variety it is!), and once it started growing, she gave it to me. That was last July. It grew well for the next couple months (it was in a small pot on my windowsill), but then seemed to stop growing and the leaves started going brown :( I thought maybe it just needed a bigger pot, so I moved it to a little bit larger of a pot, but it didn't seem to help :( I am wondering if it was just the cold and lack of much sunlight that stopped its growth? I had a couple leaves fall off, and the stalk appears to have had a split down it, as there's a hard brown like running down it. Now, I'm seeing what appears to be new growth in places, which is very exciting as it means its still alive! But I'm wondering what to do about the brown leaves? And is it ok to keep it indoors? Or should I move it outside at some point?

I realize it'll be hard to "diagnose" the problem without seeing pictures, but I can't seem to get the post an image link to work :(
If it helps, the brown appears to have started on the edges of the leaves and has worked it's way toward the middles. I looked under the leaves and there a tons of tiny white specks, but I don't have a magnifying glass so I can't tell if its bugs or dust  :-\

Oh and I live in Canada, and it gets very hot in the summer (100+ degrees F) and very cold in the winter (well below freezing).
(http://i1106.photobucket.com/albums/h373/rusahlynn/DSCN5261.jpg)
(http://i1106.photobucket.com/albums/h373/rusahlynn/DSCN5270.jpg)
(http://i1106.photobucket.com/albums/h373/rusahlynn/DSCN5275.jpg)
(http://i1106.photobucket.com/albums/h373/rusahlynn/DSCN5279.jpg)
(http://i1106.photobucket.com/albums/h373/rusahlynn/DSCN5283.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on April 01, 2013, 04:09:43 PM
low humidity is a big problem...turns leaves brown.

good luck with your mango!  Youre courageous!

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on April 01, 2013, 06:22:50 PM
I realize it'll be hard to "diagnose" the problem without seeing pictures

Hard?  I would say near impossible.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: rusahlynn on April 09, 2013, 03:05:24 PM
I realize it'll be hard to "diagnose" the problem without seeing pictures

Hard?  I would say near impossible.

Pictures added :)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on April 09, 2013, 03:10:27 PM
I really can't say what caused the browning of your leaves.  What I can say is that if new leaves are forming, ansd those leaves have no issue with the browning, then you needn't worry about it.  Mango leaves can drop for various reasons and can get burned by chemicals, salt, sun, cold, low humidity and probably a host of other things. So, I would watch the new leaves, keep humidity and light up, stay away from chemical applications and see what happens.  Good luck.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: adiel on April 09, 2013, 03:12:40 PM
Have you added anything to the soil?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: cwojo on April 09, 2013, 03:18:37 PM
My pickering had leaves that looked exactly like that. it also lived in a pot. couple weeks after the brown spots appeared the leaves smelled rotten, they started to drop, and the limb was actually dead. very surprising because it was doing great! the whole tree dried and rotted, dropped all leaves, and is now just a small stick in a pot :(
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: rusahlynn on April 09, 2013, 03:29:00 PM
My pickering had leaves that looked exactly like that. it also lived in a pot. couple weeks after the brown spots appeared the leaves smelled rotten, they started to drop, and the limb was actually dead. very surprising because it was doing great! the whole tree dried and rotted, dropped all leaves, and is now just a small stick in a pot :(

That happened to my sisters avocado too :( she figured out it was some kind of big (I can't remember what it's called....black something or other!), and she found a spray that killed it. Also apparently the bug doesn't like sand so she covered the top of the soil in sand. As did I, thinking it might be the same thing....but it doesn't seem to be....

And no, I haven't added anything to the soil.
I will keep an eye on the new leaves and see if they turn brown as well...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: demingcr on April 09, 2013, 03:39:38 PM
what soil is it potted in, it looks like ash?

There seems to be a dish underneath the pot which can cause water to pool at the feet of the plant and eventually cause root rot. This would be more prevalent in a thicker potting mix where the water can't drain all that well.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: rusahlynn on April 09, 2013, 04:36:02 PM
what soil is it potted in, it looks like ash?

There seems to be a dish underneath the pot which can cause water to pool at the feet of the plant and eventually cause root rot. This would be more prevalent in a thicker potting mix where the water can't drain all that well.

It's potted in a tropical plant soil mix...I had no idea what to use, so I just used that....I also mixed in some of that white stuff that's supposed to make it drain well since I had heard that mangos like well drained soil.
What you're seeing is the sand I put on top of the soil to prevent getting the same little bugs that my sister had that killed her avocado....I have no idea if that's ok or not  :-\
I put some pebbles in the bottom of the pot over the hole so that the water wouldn't pool, the dish is just there to keep water off my table, there is rarely water sitting in the dish...but I'll be sure to keep an eye on it and dump it immediately if theres any water in it! Thanks!!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: MangoFang on April 09, 2013, 05:26:35 PM
The white stuff I believe is called perlite....


And I beg to differ but Low Humidity is NOT a problem with mangoes....I live in a desert - if that was true I would have every single leaf of every mango looking like that one......

It could be many things - how often are they watered, do they sit in water after watering (guess that issue's been mentioned already), too much fertilizer, the water has a high salt content and if any potted plant is not flushed occasionally, (and certainly some plants more than others), they will exhibit salt burning, etc.

Rusa - do you know the kind of water you've got?  That would be my first suspect.  Can you get like some kind of water filter thing (like a Brita?) to take out some of the bad stuff you might be watering it with....?

Try flushing it real good - meaning - let a slow stream of water (probably doing this in the sink or outside with a hose) trickle into the pot and let the water drain freely out the bottom - I don't know - maybe 15 minutes?  But a real slow trickle...that should grab some of the salts sitting in the soil and take them away....

Maybe worth a try.  You're new growth budding out from the top looks healthy enough........



Fang
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on April 09, 2013, 05:54:37 PM
Low humidity, I meant to say, is not the issue, but dehydration which can come from low humidity and an inadequate amount of water to the roots.  Even with insufficient water to the roots, higher humidity will sustain the leaves for some time longer than if there was no humidity.  Mangoes love humidity and do their most vigorous growing with humidity.  That's what I meant to say.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropicdude on April 09, 2013, 06:31:08 PM
Did you use some kind of fertilizer?  does the water have a lot of chlorine, or other minerals.

try looking at the roots, just turn it over , pull it out, at look at the bottom,  use your nose, also, does it smell nasty?  do you have a lot of roots or almost non at all? 

you may have water storing at the bottom,   

salts and chemicals could cause some leaf burn like that,  my big book on nutritional problems , has leaves that look similar to this on trees with potassium deficiency.

I noticed in the picture you have already lost a couple of leaves at the top, and the tip looks like its also starting to burn.   not looking good for your little tree, but mangoes are tough little buggers.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 09, 2013, 07:08:17 PM
agree with william. possible chlorine / fert / salt burn.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Pancrazio on April 09, 2013, 07:12:09 PM
Check the stem where it buries in the soil. Usually watered plants, indoor, stay wet for too long (you know, no wind whatsoever) and this can lead to stem rot under the soil level. After that leaves have problems because the stem doesn't bring there enough water/nutrients. If the entire cambium dies, the plant can live for some time (like a cut flower) but it is practically dead.
Give the plant some fresh air and some more sun as soon as possible. But pay attention when you first expose it to sun, because it may get scorched.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: MangoFang on April 09, 2013, 07:12:33 PM
...totally agree with you Harry....


Thirsty Fang
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: digigarden on April 09, 2013, 07:24:36 PM
i remember when i went to canada that indoor plants dried up very quickly...2 waterings a day was not enough,it was incredibly dry and cold...but if it's humid and cold...that's also bad for tropicals.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on April 10, 2013, 04:43:18 AM
Although bad drainage, excess salts, potassium deficiency, and burying of the root crown are all viable interpretations of the problem, the burn patterns on the leaves and vertical white-covered brown stripe on the stem and white fluff under the leaves appear to indicate Powdery Mildew.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mike T on April 10, 2013, 05:07:03 AM
One problem can have compound effects.Sodium and chlorine are bad news and burnt edges are often a sign of salt problems and this may also influence K availability.K deficiency causes burnt tips.Exces fertilizer application can also burn leaves like that.
The quality of water used and history of fertlizer applied may hold the answer to the problem.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 10, 2013, 11:02:40 AM
Ohh wow, that would make sense since indoor temps and humidity would be conducive to PM growth. Good eye.

Although bad drainage, excess salts, potassium deficiency, and burying of the root crown are all viable interpretations of the problem, the burn patterns on the leaves and vertical white-covered brown stripe on the stem and white fluff under the leaves appear to indicate Powdery Mildew.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: rusahlynn on April 17, 2013, 12:03:11 AM
Wow, thanks for all the great replies!
We are on well water, so I'm not sure what's all in it, all I know is its very hard, it leaves white deposits everywhere. For example, our kettle will have a solid white layer on the bottom within a day or two after totally cleaning it!
I have never used any sort of fertilizer or anything like that on it, all I do is water it!
I will maybe try "flushing it out" (or whatever it's called!) and see if that helps!
I now have three new leaves (yay!), each about an inch long, and I am keeping a close eye on them for any brownness!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropicdude on April 17, 2013, 02:24:38 AM
Sounds like lime deposits, have you ever checked the Ph of your water? if not try getting one of those Ph kits.  and/or even testing the soil. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: amadioranch on April 17, 2013, 11:03:00 AM
low humidity is a big problem...turns leaves brown.

good luck with your mango!  Youre courageous!

I hear this repeated often....how does that jive with the fact that we grow mangoes with relative success here in Phoenix? Most of the year our humidity levels are below 10%.
 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mario on April 25, 2013, 10:59:11 PM
Anyone knows what might be the cause? The flowers started putting little fruuts but they dried up and turned black
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fruitlovers on April 26, 2013, 12:01:45 AM
Anyone knows what might be the cause? The flowers started putting little fruuts but they dried up and turned black

I guess anthracnose--fungal disease. Spraying with copper usually used to prevent that.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mike T on April 26, 2013, 06:52:12 AM
Sure sounds like anthracnose to me as well.Too much rain or water during flowering and poor nutrition can make it worse.Copper oxychloride and sometimes with a dash of mancozeb is used here.The fungicide treatment can burn the flower and small fruit off as effectively as the disease.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on April 26, 2013, 07:19:14 AM
depending on if there were truly "little fruits", hard to tell without pictures, it could also just be the life cycle of the pannicles without setting any fruit.  Here in SFla, with the extremely late blooms we have had or are getting, a lot of the pannnicles are just frying up/dying with no fruit set whatsoever.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Charlie23 on April 26, 2013, 05:11:47 PM
this happened to my potted carrie too.... of all the pannicles or bloom, only 1 set fruit, and i doubt it'll make it to a full size mango anyway. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Pancrazio on April 28, 2013, 08:58:44 AM
Once more, after the cold winter, my mango starts to bloom. I have removed the first bloom early because panicles growt during winter usually are poor, with deformed ovary, and mostly male. So i removed the panicles when they were very young, too soon before noticing anything strange. I was hoping in an healthy second bloom with more favorable temperatures.
Last year (spring 2012) i got one diseased panicles, apparently one from MMD. I'm not sure because our long cold humid winter surely can give a lot of problem to a plant, so, of course, it may have been just a metabolic disease.  The plant seemed to recover during summer and the growth was normal till now. Now, in the second bloom of 2013, i seem to have spotted some blooms that aren't growing as expected: i'm wondering if someone of our experts can tell me if they are definitively from MMD, because on that cause, i would remove them and prune the twig. They seem to stay on the short side for now, but of course they are still vey small. Maybe i'm still in time for getting another bloom, but temperature are about to rise, and if i'm not quick i'll lose the chance to get some fruit in 2013, and it would be upsetting.

Here some picture of what i'm talking about. Do they seem normal to you?

(http://i.imgur.com/LlHeQ0R.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/y3X9bLD.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/9DhhOlu.jpg)

In the last picture you can see the panicles low in the twig that have formed a bit earlier, but the seem me more healthy and well formed. Any idea/suggestion? Thank you from an hopeless grower.

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: davidgarcia899 on April 30, 2013, 05:52:07 PM
This goes out to all the forum members in Florida who have an Angie planted.

When it comes to mangos my property hates them. Serious I have planted dozens of varieties only to see them die from disease. Only my NDM have grown without any disease problems, although the fruits always crack  >:(. I have a Mallika that is doing okay and same for a San Felipe.

So what are your experiences growing Angie? Is it disease resistant?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on April 30, 2013, 06:07:59 PM
It is very disease resistant....at my house anyway.  But then again, most mango trees do well at my house.  If a mango tree is dying at your house, I would be looking into some sort of soil contaminant, like a petroleum product or such, mangoes don't just die.  Its takes some doing to kill them as long as you provide water.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangokothiyan on April 30, 2013, 09:40:12 PM

Have been trying to get an Angie, but the tree is hard to find.

Apart from Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, is there any place where one can buy a 3 gallon Angie? What are the chances of getting one at the mango festival? 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on April 30, 2013, 09:45:05 PM

Have been trying to get an Angie, but the tree is hard to find.

Apart from Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, is there any place where one can buy a 3 gallon Angie? What are the chances of getting one at the mango festival?

They are good if I don't buy them all the day before and you can beat sleepdoc in a 400 meter sprint.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: davidgarcia899 on April 30, 2013, 10:16:33 PM
It is very disease resistant....at my house anyway.  But then again, most mango trees do well at my house.  If a mango tree is dying at your house, I would be looking into some sort of soil contaminant, like a petroleum product or such, mangoes don't just die.  Its takes some doing to kill them as long as you provide water.

They don't die immediately, they get diseased and slowly die,
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on April 30, 2013, 10:19:31 PM
Diseased how?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 01, 2013, 12:32:22 AM
normal blooms
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: davidgarcia899 on May 01, 2013, 12:38:09 AM
I am pretty sure it some sort of fungus. It looks like anthracnose the only difference is that the leaves eventually begin to turn brown and brittle staring around the edges and then the stem begins to die until it burns all the way down
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on May 01, 2013, 07:02:57 AM
Are you sure you had malformation on any part of the plant in the past?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: johnb51 on May 01, 2013, 09:14:34 AM
I am pretty sure it some sort of fungus. It looks like anthracnose the only difference is that the leaves eventually begin to turn brown and brittle staring around the edges and then the stem begins to die until it burns all the way down

I wonder if the Fairchild, UF, or USDA people down your way could help you determine what the problem is.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: davidgarcia899 on May 01, 2013, 09:45:17 AM
Are you sure you had malformation on any part of the plant in the past?

sorry rob what do you mean?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tim on May 01, 2013, 11:11:37 AM
I believe BSbullie was addressing Pancrazio's post prior to my merging of the two topics.

Are you sure you had malformation on any part of the plant in the past?

sorry rob what do you mean?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on May 01, 2013, 01:29:24 PM
I believe BSbullie was addressing Pancrazio's post prior to my merging of the two topics.

Are you sure you had malformation on any part of the plant in the past?

sorry rob what do you mean?
Tim is correct.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Pancrazio on May 01, 2013, 06:28:42 PM
normal blooms

Thank you very much Har. Too bad, i was really paranoid about this mango malformation disease, and pruned the two terminal twig away yesterday. :(
Now i'm a bit on the sad side.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Doglips on May 06, 2013, 07:18:03 AM
After seeing how the Mango Whisperers are able to diagnose nutritional problems I started looking around the net.  There are many sites that help you do this, but this seems to be one of the better ones, the flow charts are great, and learning about mobile and immobile nutrients was the real a-ha moment for me.

http://landresources.montana.edu/NM/Modules/Module9.pdf (http://landresources.montana.edu/NM/Modules/Module9.pdf)

It was designed for grain crops (I don't think they grow many tropicals in Montana). I think that the core symptoms should apply to most any plant.  It doesn't cover pH lockout and many nutrient toxicities but it is still good.  Multiple deficiencies can really muddy the water.

It does seem like the easiest solution is to fertilize with major-minors-micros for most nutrient problems (defiencies at least).
 
I've been Fe and Mn dosing a couple of plant after reading this, I think I am have some success.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mario on May 06, 2013, 01:31:52 PM
Has anyone here fertilized with the potash 0-0-51? Have you gotten noticeable results?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: edzone9 on May 06, 2013, 06:15:19 PM
Hello members;

I Have a Nice Carrie Mango Tree That is Blooming , I noticed little black dots on some of the green leaves , not on the blooms , Can I Spray the entire with Copper spray including the Blooms , Or Should i spray the entire tree with Neem Oil ?

If i have to spray with either , how often do i have to spray ?
Its my 1st Mango Bllom ;).
Thank You Ed.

(http://s11.postimg.cc/y94lhfl4v/IMG_20130504_192806_609.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/y94lhfl4v/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: natsgarden123 on May 06, 2013, 07:04:22 PM
this looks healthy to me ...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: edzone9 on May 06, 2013, 07:08:51 PM
Thank You , But i spotted some small rounded black spots on some leaves , i just want to prepare incase its a fungus .

What works better on Mangos , Neem Or Copper ?
Thank You Ed.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on May 06, 2013, 07:36:17 PM
While it is hard to say for sure without a close up picture, most likely its anthracnose which you would treat by spraying the entire tree with copper fungicide.  In any event, especially with the rains we/you have had, the blooms should be sprayed with copper to help prevent anthracnose/bloom rot on the blooms which will help or increase the chances of fruit set.

I would not spray neem.  Be very careful with spraying oils.  They CAN have their place but I feel they are way overused as a cure all.  In fact, if sprayed at the wrong time of day or under the wrong conditions, you could actually do harm to the tree.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: edzone9 on May 07, 2013, 05:19:39 PM
Thanks Rob I Appreciate Your Help !
Will Spray Copper !

Ed.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: TnTrobbie on May 14, 2013, 11:03:18 PM
Would tipping new mango flushes that haven't hardened yet but fully formed make it succeptable to disease or problems? Any adverse effects from tipping or pruning when a tree has fruitlets forming?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: VentureRider on July 03, 2013, 07:46:40 PM
I have a Baileys Marvel mango that is approx. 3 years old...one year in my yard.

At times, it has lots of new growth...but after about a week,  the buds/leaves/new growth begin to turn black, then shrivel up and die.

I've included 4 pics showing the various stages of the new growths "demise".

Following the advice of a gardening center, I've applied 3 doses of Dithane-M45 (once a week for three weeks)...and things seem to clear up.

This happens every time there is a new flush of growth...not ALL of the new growth dies off, probably 30% dies, but the rest remains healthy looking.

Any suggestions or assistance would be greatly appreciated!
(http://s14.postimg.cc/jyftr949p/IMG_2059.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/jyftr949p/)

(http://s14.postimg.cc/5hskcoesd/IMG_2060.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/5hskcoesd/)

(http://s14.postimg.cc/881w9vbh9/IMG_2184.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/881w9vbh9/)

(http://s14.postimg.cc/ixfl24na5/IMG_2185.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/ixfl24na5/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: y0rascal on July 03, 2013, 08:05:59 PM
not an expert, but based off of dr. Campbells tipping and pruning tips, he says after your harvest and or flowers, to remove the spores because it can carry disease into the tree. based of his video, he just tips the ends. I did this with my spirit of 76 which hasn't fruited but flowered. I tipped them all and now have new growths off all the stems.

check out his video on youtube, something like pruning after harvest
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: DuncanYoung on July 03, 2013, 09:07:29 PM
Might be mango die back.  Usually a fungal infection.  Copper spray should help along with a good nutritional program, especially one that includes the use of the minor elements, iron, zinc, manganese and boron.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: VentureRider on July 06, 2013, 11:58:33 AM
Thanks for the advice!

I have been using Sunniland 6-4-6 fertilizer.  Is there a "better" fertilizer for mangos?  I made a trip to Home Depot and a local nursery looking for something 0-0-22...but no luck.  :(

In terms of fungicide...should I be spraying the tree at the first sign of new growth...or should I wait a couple of days, then spray?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on July 06, 2013, 01:10:34 PM
I have absolutely no idea what disease your mango has.  Regretfully, if it was in my yard, I would destroy it and start over.  It really looks scary and contagious.  Have you other mango trees nearby?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropicdude on July 08, 2013, 09:44:16 PM
Venture,  If you want to give your tree one more chance before yanking it, you can pug it,  and remove all the leaves.  if the new stuff comes up the same,  destroy it.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: VentureRider on July 09, 2013, 12:48:55 PM
I have absolutely no idea what disease your mango has.  Regretfully, if it was in my yard, I would destroy it and start over.  It really looks scary and contagious.  Have you other mango trees nearby?
I've a Zill approx 20' to the east...and it is doing just fine...no symptoms like the Bailey's....

It looks like the Bailey is going to put out some more leafs/growth in the next week or so...I'm going into a holding pattern, since I just completed the 3rd spray of Dithane-M approx 10 days ago.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropicdude on July 09, 2013, 03:46:25 PM
The reason I mentioned removing the leaves, was to prevent any possible contamination to the new leaves.  if you pug and remove all leaves, you kind of remove any "food source" if its a bacteria, bug or fungus. and prevents it spreading to the new growth.
on the other hand if its a virus, than its probably a gonner.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: y0rascal on July 09, 2013, 03:49:24 PM
When i see the darkness on the branches or leaves, /I cut it to avoid the infection/fungus/bacteria from spreading.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: MarinFla on July 09, 2013, 08:09:58 PM
The reason I mentioned removing the leaves, was to prevent any possible contamination to the new leaves.  if you pug and remove all leaves, you kind of remove any "food source" if its a bacteria, bug or fungus. and prevents it spreading to the new growth.
on the other hand if its a virus, than its probably a gonner.
Removing the leaves won't help. That black stuff actually starts at the base of the new twig growth and spreads its way up to the leaves and causes the leaves to die then the twig follows. It almost looks like a black shellac coating.  I have this going on with a seedling that I am growing. I had initially thought it might be due to damage I caused to the tap root when I transferred  to a bigger pot. It did improve a bit when I fertilized it. I have it on the side of my house away from my other trees and I will let nature take its course. We'll see how it goes. It had a nice growth flush at the end of May and it did well. Then I noticed it happening again a few weeks ago. None of my other trees have had anything like this so it my not be contagious. Somewhere up this thread are the pictures I posted of the same mystery disease.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: VentureRider on July 11, 2013, 11:42:26 AM
Removing the leaves won't help. That black stuff actually starts at the base of the new twig growth and spreads its way up to the leaves and causes the leaves to die then the twig follows. It almost looks like a black shellac coating.  I have this going on with a seedling that I am growing.  We'll see how it goes. It had a nice growth flush at the end of May and it did well. Then I noticed it happening again a few weeks ago. None of my other trees have had anything like this so it my not be contagious. Somewhere up this thread are the pictures I posted of the same mystery disease.

What fungicide have your sprayed on your tree?  I've been using Dithane-M45, once a week for three weeks.  It appears that in the next week or so, I'l be getting a lot of new leaves....if they start to appear sickly, I'm going to spray with Copper fungicide to see if it makes any difference.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: MarinFla on July 11, 2013, 07:56:53 PM
I have been using a mixture of insecticidal soap, copper and dynagrow foliage pro
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: TnTrobbie on July 18, 2013, 03:28:53 PM
Any idea what this is? My Philippine mango tree. Applied foilar spray with Sequestrene (1st time incorp'd to the mix) to all my trees on the 1st of July. This is the only tree that had problems. It's in a pot.

It started off developing like this 10 days after the spray:
(http://img856.imageshack.us/img856/225/mltq.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/856/mltq.jpg/)
(http://img703.imageshack.us/img703/9020/2uwe.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/703/2uwe.jpg/)

15 days after spray:
(http://img833.imageshack.us/img833/989/9cbu.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/833/9cbu.jpg/)

Fert burn?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on July 18, 2013, 04:17:00 PM
Yep....I would say that the sun and mix you sprayed conspired to do this.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on July 18, 2013, 07:23:01 PM
What else was in your foliar mix? Urea?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: TnTrobbie on July 18, 2013, 08:46:36 PM
 ;D No. Just Southern AG Foilar (2Tbs/ gal) and Sequestrene (1Tbs from dissolving 1Tbs/1000ml). My other potted trees (Fernandin and Dupuis) didn't show any such burn. Same sun exposure length and I sprayed at sun set.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Doglips on July 23, 2013, 12:55:18 AM
New growth dieback can be a lack of calcium or boron.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: jc on August 13, 2013, 09:26:04 AM
This is a new shoot on my Dot tree. All the margins on this shoot appear to be doing the same thing. Any suggestions as to the cause of this symptom?  It is otherwise a very healthy and rapidly growing tree.
(http://s11.postimg.cc/3w48rj1en/image.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/3w48rj1en/)

(http://s11.postimg.cc/maervidpb/image.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/maervidpb/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 13, 2013, 10:57:24 PM
good pictures.  They have me stumped.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on August 14, 2013, 08:06:32 AM
This is a new shoot on my Dot tree. All the margins on this shoot appear to be doing the same thing. Any suggestions as to the cause of this symptom?  It is otherwise a very healthy and rapidly growing tree.
([url]http://s11.postimg.cc/3w48rj1en/image.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/3w48rj1en/[/url])

([url]http://s11.postimg.cc/maervidpb/image.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/maervidpb/[/url])


Growing mangoes in Florida in the summertime, at least, is a very forgiving task.  Occasionally, you will see some things that are not explicable...at least not by me (and apparently I am in good company...with Har). Most of these conditions seems to be temporary and the tree seems to forget about whatever funky thing the last set of leaves wanted to do.  I'd do nothing with this and wait to see how the next flush or two do. If it continues, then you might have something that needs addressing.  But, I'll be that your next flushes may be normal.  Let's wait and see.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: jc on August 14, 2013, 12:03:12 PM
Har and Harry,

Thanks for the attempt. I'm not really concerned, just curious at this point.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mucbean on August 27, 2013, 07:45:42 PM
Does anyone know what is causing this on my mango tree. It looked fine(except for the browning of the leaves at the bottom) a week ago. I'm not sure what type of mango tree it is, it was given to me by a vietnamese friend of mine.
Thanks,
Mike

(http://s9.postimg.cc/6m3vwt4nv/Mango1.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/6m3vwt4nv/)

(http://s9.postimg.cc/71f5ptql7/Mango2.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/71f5ptql7/)

(http://s9.postimg.cc/kttklghcr/Mango3.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/kttklghcr/)

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 28, 2013, 09:34:41 PM
Likely to be powdery mildew or anthracnose, and the condition was probably contributed to by wind damage when the new leaves were at their most tender stage.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangoprofessor on August 29, 2013, 04:10:09 PM
There are many different problems people have asked questions about through the course of this thread. 

The first one was regarding what appears to be some kind of egg cases on a mango plant.  I also noted that in the close-up pictures, it looked like some of the egg cases may have already hatched out.  Before applying any kind of spray I think it is important to determine: is it friend or foe?  Since no one seemed to recognize what was in the picture, I suggest the following course of action.  Get a one quart canning jar (a clean Classico spaghetti sauce jar will do nicely).   Pick up some plastic window screen scraps from your local hardware store.  Carefully remove some un-hatched egg cases and deposit them in the canning jar.   Screw on the canning jar screw cap, minus the lid and some place where you won't forget it or the sun won't cook it.  Watch and see what hatches.  If they are a friend of the garden, release them.  If they are a pest, add a little dish soap, fill with water and dump them down the drain. 

As for the fungal diseases, where there is a minor infection use Kop-r spray.  For more severe infection, like the nasty looking black one,  I suggest cutting the tree back to healthy material and discarding the infected part in the trash or burn it.  Make sure the clippers are then disinfected with Clorox so you don't  transfer the problem to other plants.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Triloba Tracker on September 08, 2013, 03:15:26 PM
Wanted to share some pictures of our little Cogshall and see if anyone has any thoughts.

We bought it in June from Excalibur and brought it back to TN with us.  It's still in the same pot and has been outside in as much sun and heat as we can provide it.  On cooler nights we've been bringing it in. 
I have been watering it only sparingly, and it does drain well.  We pugged it about 2-3 weeks ago.

This first picture is of the tip of the tree where we cut it, and you can see the sort of necrotic section at the top.  I'm assuming this is okay, as it does appear that the leaf nodes directly below it are bulging somewhat with what I hope is future branching.

(http://s8.postimg.cc/ns5niynr5/IMG_0055.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/ns5niynr5/)

My second concern is some of the newer leaves, which have some holes and in some cases have just died back by about 50%


(http://s22.postimg.cc/vl1ogjou5/IMG_0053.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/vl1ogjou5/)

Lastly, some of the older leaves have small black spots, but they haven't seemed to spread or get bigger.  Anything to worry about?

(http://s23.postimg.cc/4emjkrox3/IMG_0054.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/4emjkrox3/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on September 08, 2013, 10:58:47 PM
The third picture shows Mango Bacterial Leaf Spot, probably from too-wet conditions back at the nursery.  Keep the leaves from staying wet for many hours, and the infection is not likely to spread much.  When the leaves get old, or when there is plenty of new growth to sustain the plant, dispose of the contaminated leaves.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Triloba Tracker on September 10, 2013, 12:01:28 PM
The third picture shows Mango Bacterial Leaf Spot, probably from too-wet conditions back at the nursery.  Keep the leaves from staying wet for many hours, and the infection is not likely to spread much.  When the leaves get old, or when there is plenty of new growth to sustain the plant, dispose of the contaminated leaves.

Thank you so much!

One other question, out of curiosity.  The third picture I posted above also shows some pale speckling on the mature leaves.  I would almost call it iridescent - it sort of shimmers or changes colors as you move the leaf around in the sun. It almost looks like a residue of something, but I've never sprayed anything on the leaves.

Anything to be worried about?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on October 11, 2013, 08:14:13 AM
My Cogshall has recently shown sooty mold growth on many of its leaves.  It's my understanding sooty mold is a result of white fly infestation, as well as aphids.  But an inspection hasn't revealed the presence of either pest.  What are other possible causes?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: phantomcrab on October 11, 2013, 09:17:02 AM
I have noticed it on my Maha's interior leaves but not on any other trees.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 11, 2013, 11:02:04 PM
Mealy bug and scale also produce honeydew which black sooty mold grows on.

In several cases, I have not found a culprit, but sooty mold can be visible for months after the pests are gone.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 11, 2013, 11:06:23 PM
Mineral deposits from water can sometimes be iridescent when still very thin.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on October 12, 2013, 05:06:42 PM
Mealy bug and scale also produce honeydew which black sooty mold grows on.

In several cases, I have not found a culprit, but sooty mold can be visible for months after the pests are gone.
What do you recommend for treating either or both of these pests?  I have a bottle of Southern Ag Parafine Horticultural Oil.  But my concern is the label says not to use after October 1 in Florida.  I'm surprised.  Can someone tell me why?  Thank you.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangaba on October 12, 2013, 09:26:11 PM
 I have a mango tree in my garden where most of the mangos show this change in pulp.  Is this a  nutritional problem ? What corrective measure would be advisable?

(http://s22.postimg.cc/722rlvn99/doen_a_manga_005.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/722rlvn99/)

                       
              Thank you in antecipation
                                                                          mangaba
               
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bangkok on October 15, 2013, 08:52:59 AM
moved
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on October 15, 2013, 12:34:12 PM
I have a mango tree in my garden where most of the mangos show this change in pulp.  Is this a  nutritional problem ? What corrective measure would be advisable?

([url]http://s22.postimg.cc/722rlvn99/doen_a_manga_005.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/722rlvn99/[/url])

                       
              Thank you in antecipation
                                                                          mangaba
             


What kind of mango is is this?  Has it fruited before with a different looking interior?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 15, 2013, 08:03:46 PM
Mangaba,

What kind of soil is your tree growing in?  What kind of fertilizer have applied?
A good mix containing lots of Potassium, Magnesium, Zinc, and Boron, usually along with several other elements, should probably be applied to the ground, under the tips of the branches.  Lime or Gypsum, for Calcium, should also be applied.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 15, 2013, 08:07:43 PM
Carbo,

Oil sprays, applied two weeks or so before cold weather, increases many plants susceptibility to cold damage.  But that 1 Oct cut-off date sounds appropriate to Zone 9b!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on October 15, 2013, 08:51:41 PM
Carbo,

Oil sprays, applied two weeks or so before cold weather, increases many plants susceptibility to cold damage.  But that 1 Oct cut-off date sounds appropriate to Zone 9b!
Thanks, Har.  If that is Southern Ag's reasoning, then it really has no bearing for those of us here in southeast FL.  I should be good to go this weekend.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: nch on October 22, 2013, 12:27:27 AM
I am sorry if my question has been asked and answered before, but I am overwhelmed with all the reading about mango diseases and sprays, I need a short cut. I just bought a Mallika mango, and some of the leaves have brown edges with some greasy stuff on them on the underside. It's too dark to go take pictures right now, but if needed, I'll take some tomorrow. Not knowing any better, I did cut off the worst ones and threw them away yesterday. I didn't realize they could be a sign of something really bad.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on October 22, 2013, 08:18:13 AM
Mangoes don't necessarily require spaying to grow and be productive.  Cutting off the diseased leaves was not a bad thing....except for diagnosing the problem.  Keep the tree well watered and give it a very light balanced fertilizer (time release is good). Make sure the fertilizer has minor elements.  And I repeat.......light on the fertilizer.  If the problem comes back take pictures and re-post.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: nch on October 22, 2013, 12:04:23 PM
Thank you Harry for answering. It's good to know that mangoes don't require spraying to grow. Here are some pictures I just took. The fungus under the leaf is new to me. The new leaves are not affected, at least to my newbie eyes.[imghttp://(http://i1318.photobucket.com/albums/t651/achoi45/DSCF7710_zps334f1a4f.jpg) (http://s1318.photobucket.com/user/achoi45/media/DSCF7710_zps334f1a4f.jpg.html)(http://i1318.photobucket.com/albums/t651/achoi45/DSCF7713_zps36a0ae3a.jpg) (http://s1318.photobucket.com/user/achoi45/media/DSCF7713_zps36a0ae3a.jpg.html)(http://i1318.photobucket.com/albums/t651/achoi45/DSCF7714_zpsd67f1725.jpg) (http://s1318.photobucket.com/user/achoi45/media/DSCF7714_zpsd67f1725.jpg.html)][/img]
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on October 22, 2013, 07:53:50 PM
The one burnt leaf looks similar to fertilizer burn, but the other leaves look healthy and you're growing in a completely different climate than me. It also looks like there may be some premature leaf drop on the trunk, which could also be a sign of either fert burn or lack of water. Mangoes can be very sensitive to over fertilization.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: nch on October 22, 2013, 08:44:40 PM
Thank you, Cookie Monster. As for the fungus under the leaves, is it something to worry about?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on October 22, 2013, 09:23:52 PM
Is it fungus underneath or scale insect.  From the picture it is hard to tell.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: nch on October 22, 2013, 09:28:57 PM
Harry, it is fungus. It was very visible in the morning when the leaves were covered with dew, but at noon time, when the leaves were dry, I could barely see it.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on October 22, 2013, 11:02:33 PM
My thought was that the fungus was a symptom rather than a cause of the problem -- simply taking advantage of the burnt margins to feast a little.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 22, 2013, 11:06:16 PM
Powdery mildew, active
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: nch on October 22, 2013, 11:08:37 PM
Thank you Jeff and Har. I'll just try to keep the leaves dry.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: pominasia on November 18, 2013, 12:55:36 AM
Anyone have any what is attacking this mango tree ?  Note that I live in Thailand. 

(http://s10.postimg.cc/x4i7iyx6d/IMG_1240_mango.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/x4i7iyx6d/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bangkok on November 18, 2013, 08:11:01 PM
The older leaves look fine and i see new flushings are coming. I don't know what you fed them or sprayed in the garden? I use fruitbags if i want to protect new flushings (for my grafts) against insects.

I think it is not a serious problem.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 18, 2013, 08:36:56 PM
Powdery Mildew.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: edzone9 on December 01, 2013, 11:14:21 AM
Hello Gang ;

My Lemon Zest Mango tree leaves appear to be semi shriveled .
My other mango trees leaves are all normal with no leave shrivel.
is this normal for the LZ or is it sick ? , if so can I bring it back o should I pull it out of the ground ?
Should I PUGG it ?

Thanks Ed..


(http://s24.postimg.cc/7f87uozup/LZ_2.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/7f87uozup/)

(http://s23.postimg.cc/g17ckr3cn/LZ_Mango.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/g17ckr3cn/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on December 01, 2013, 11:38:23 AM
I'm not a mango kinda of guy but am pretty good at reading plants, so, if I had to take an educated guess your (minor) leaf cupping is due to the natural characteristics of your cultivar OR you have a root system problem.  Leaf cupping, leaf tip margin roll, shriveling, etc. are a response to moisture stress, an imbalance in tissue water turgor.  That can be caused by a root system that is shot (over watering, soil rots, etc.) or inadequate watering, OR, too much plant food.

Your tree looks pretty damn healthy to me.  I have a newly planted Mallika that has more upward leaf margin cupping than yours.  I know the root system is fine so I'm gonna chalk it up to the "way of the world".  :)

Topping it isn't gonna solve anything.  All that's gonna do is create a tree with a shorter profile and more branching.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: edzone9 on December 01, 2013, 11:47:06 AM
Thanks Mark , I will monitor it ..

Thanks again Ed..
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on December 01, 2013, 11:59:43 AM
That looks like the normal growth habit of the Lemon Zest leaves to me.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: edzone9 on December 01, 2013, 12:13:08 PM
Thank you...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 02, 2013, 10:53:45 AM
I don't see anything worrisome.

If the soil doesn't have much Calcium, you might give it some Gypsum (Calcium sulfate) to make the plant sturdier.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: noneof on February 20, 2014, 04:53:25 PM

(http://s28.postimg.cc/n4cbhqusp/DSC01673.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/n4cbhqusp/)

(http://s8.postimg.cc/x8cg0wo8x/DSC01678.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/x8cg0wo8x/)

can anyone help me with this problem, about 5 month old mango started from seed. in miracle grow soil. started turning brown about 1 1/2 months ago. also have smaller mango tree starting with same issue. in los angeles, night temps at 50 degrees. days about 75.  I water only when dry. thanks in advance.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: MangoFang on February 20, 2014, 04:59:19 PM
My guess would be fertilizer burn (maybe even in the miracle grow mix -
get rid of it and just use some "normal" potting soil, maybe) or a LACK
of water....how often do you water it?

If you planted it in the ground there is much less chance of these kinds of
things happening.....


Gary
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: noneof on February 20, 2014, 05:07:59 PM
only reason I don't put in the ground yet is cause I heard small mangos cant handle 40 deg. night temps. so when we do get 40's I bring them inside. I was gonna wait till they are atleast 2 years to put into the ground. but I think I will change the soil. no nutes and more sand? is this plant gone, or do you think she can pull through? thanks
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: noneof on February 20, 2014, 05:10:15 PM
I water when top couple inches of soil is dry. and feel the weight of the pot.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: noneof on February 20, 2014, 05:13:44 PM

(http://s13.postimg.cc/9a7clwsar/DSC01679.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/9a7clwsar/)
 I also have this avocado this is showing kind of the same issues. about 1 1/2 years old but is in kellogs patio plus soil. the difference with this avocado is it is still showing new growth.and mangos have stop growing new leaves.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: MangoFang on February 20, 2014, 05:17:40 PM
Yep - another one - same advice as for the mangoes.  Whatever you're doing with them
in pots will be significantly harder to do to them in the ground....

Gary
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: nch on February 20, 2014, 05:55:03 PM
What are those brown specks on your mango leaves? Soil or some kind of pests?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on February 20, 2014, 06:14:42 PM
I'm thinking you need to be generous with your water.  Miracle Grow soil drains well as long as there is a hole in the bottom of the pot. There may be other issues, but I would think watering more will be helpful.  I would not let the soil dry out completely before watering.  And BTW, I think mango seedlings do fine is 40 degree temps.  They're fine down to frost/freezing temps.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: noneof on February 20, 2014, 07:06:58 PM
lil spots on the small plant is just dust, its been real windy here. I just watered and the runoff came out real yellow so I watered for awhile till water was clear. crossing my fingers. and if my plant recovers I will put in the ground asap. thanks to all for advice.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 20, 2014, 07:35:28 PM
Check for white spores early in the morning after a cool (less than 77 degrees), humid night.

Your mango and avocado may have powdery mildew.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangoprofessor on March 08, 2014, 12:31:14 PM
Re: question of the burnt mango leaf margins.  I agree with the person who posed:  forget the miracle grow potting mix.  That mix is too hot, meaning too much fertilizer in the potting mix.  That mix also does not have enough sand for good drainage.  Young mango plants can be burnt or killed with commercial fertilizer that have too much nitrogen too.  Stick to an organic potting mix with at least 40% sand for good drainage.  With that kind of mix, good watering shouldn't be a problem.  For watering, go light in cool weather but give the plant plenty of water during hot Summer weather.  A trick that I use for large mango trees in a pot, 15 gallon size.  Picture below, note the blossom panicles.

(http://s18.postimg.cc/a3ojs8dg5/Mango_in_pot_A.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/a3ojs8dg5/)

Put the pot in a basin that you can pick up at any nursery. During the Summer or hot weather, watch the basin.  When the basin dries out, it is time to water again.  Picture of basis at bottom of pix.

(http://s4.postimg.cc/okwo0xkhl/Mango_tree_basin_A.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/okwo0xkhl/)


Mango Professor




Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 08, 2014, 02:42:27 PM
Add BTi to basin to avoid raising mosquitoes.  (Mosquito Dunks, Mosquito Bits, etc)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mikesid on March 23, 2014, 02:06:18 PM
Here are some pics from 3 mango trees I have showing some deficiency. I have applied a Sequestrene Fe drench approximately 3 weeks ago. I also did a micro nutrient drench right before that using Brandt Biomaster. However I have not done foliar spray yet of either. I have not seen any improvement after the drenches.  Could it be a Zn or Manganese deficiency?

PPK

(http://s18.postimg.cc/83lhawjbp/IMG_0540.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/83lhawjbp/)

Lemon Zest (my larger Lemon Zest tree leaves are normal)

(http://s11.postimg.cc/453khzpcf/IMG_0541.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/453khzpcf/)

Coconut Cream


(http://s4.postimg.cc/a28pt51l5/IMG_0542.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/a28pt51l5/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on March 23, 2014, 02:15:07 PM
I would cut the trees down and plant 3 Tommy Atinks in their place.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: jc on March 23, 2014, 03:42:39 PM
It's definitely Rob! 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 23, 2014, 06:11:10 PM
Manganese deficiency.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mikesid on March 23, 2014, 07:04:01 PM
Manganese deficiency.
Thanks Har! although there is some manganese in the brandt biomaster it may not be enough to correct the problem by itself?? maybe I should ad a manganese chelate to the regimen for these trees..
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on March 23, 2014, 08:02:15 PM
What are you watering with? Well water? Maybe sacrifice the sod for mangoes.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mikesid on March 23, 2014, 08:26:47 PM
What are you watering with? Well water? Maybe sacrifice the sod for mangoes.
I've been using city water until I get my irrigation pumped replaced..usually it draws from the canal behind the house
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropicalgrower89 on March 23, 2014, 08:39:52 PM
City water tends to be very alkaline and contains chlorine. I think that's your problem.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on March 23, 2014, 09:58:29 PM
yah, unless you have some unique soil situation, you should have deep sand (~neutral ph) in boynton beach. So, the manganese deficiency would presumably be from an alkaline water source.

I completely nixed (mulched over) about 90% of my grass and turned off all irrigation (both to the chagrin of the homeowner's association :-). The little patch of grass in the front yard starts looking brown during the spring, but my mangoes are happy, and that's all that counts ;-).
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fruitlovers on March 23, 2014, 11:09:53 PM
I think that is PM, powdery mildew, on your flowers. If so copper sulfate spray should help.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomandan on March 25, 2014, 09:34:59 AM
Others could speak to this better,  but I think that it takes a good while for the leaves to show improvement, after you apply minerals. I'm not even sure that the older leaves will always improve.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mikesid on March 25, 2014, 09:41:23 AM
Others could speak to this better,  but I think that it takes a good while for the leaves to show improvement, after you apply minerals. I'm not even sure that the older leaves will always improve.
I was wondering this myself...maybe only the new growth shows the improvement?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: NaturalGreenthumb on March 27, 2014, 06:07:46 PM
Can someone please help me identify the problem with my mango.

There are these  burnt scaring appearing on my mango tree leaves.

Tomatayo and keitt mango leaves.

Is there a solution for this problem?

(http://i967.photobucket.com/albums/ae156/yellowbrickroad_54/b31aa12afa0cf6f35bea167730c4d4df_zpsc1b7c1da.jpg) (http://s967.photobucket.com/user/yellowbrickroad_54/media/b31aa12afa0cf6f35bea167730c4d4df_zpsc1b7c1da.jpg.html)

(http://i967.photobucket.com/albums/ae156/yellowbrickroad_54/9b623090b45a730a0587577811b308f0_zps2d4da25d.jpg) (http://s967.photobucket.com/user/yellowbrickroad_54/media/9b623090b45a730a0587577811b308f0_zps2d4da25d.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomanic12 on March 27, 2014, 06:22:35 PM
Bad water - just my guess. At least it still looks good and not dying. ;)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomaniac2 on March 27, 2014, 07:25:20 PM
I would say salty water as well. We in Phoenix know what that's about.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: NaturalGreenthumb on March 28, 2014, 10:13:17 PM
I think I have an answer to my own problem and I think it's fertilizer burn.

You know moderators.

You should consider havering certain subjects as a sticky so people don't have to search for it.

I.e. fruit diseases and in the subcategory have mango, orange, longan....etc...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 28, 2014, 10:55:15 PM
Have you sprayed lately, such as with oil or soap?  It looks as though something settled on the lower parts, dips, of the leaves.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: NaturalGreenthumb on March 28, 2014, 11:07:50 PM
Have you sprayed lately, such as with oil or soap?  It looks as though something settled on the lower parts, dips, of the leaves.

No no spraying oil or soap.

I did fertilize it with hydroponic nutrients.

I've seen fertilizer burn before and they generally start at the leaf tip and move inward but not in sections like this.  Most of the main Vaines are undamaged.


It's either fertilizer burn that I have not seen before or it's sun burn.

I don't know what else.

Anyone?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mangosurf on April 03, 2014, 04:58:05 PM
This is a sad story but I planted some mango trees at my Dad's house and they were doing fine until I left to study abroad. Since the 2 years I have been gone 4 trees have died and the 2 trees shown below will be the fifth and sixth if I can't figure out how to save them. The trees seem to be doing fine, then some just suddenly get stiff leaves that continue to shrivel up and fall off, plus turning either red (like rust) or showing large black and gray spots, with the tree eventually dying. He lives about 3/4 mile from the ocean, and in an old avocado grove, so the soil is sandy, good draining "brown sugar".  I don't think  they are overwatered since they were watered about every 10 days this winter when it has been sunny and hot, and about every 2-3 weeks when it has been cool.  There is a gopher problem, but the trees were planted in 1" poultry net baskets. The trees have been sprayed several times--first with greenlight fruit tree spray, then neem oil, then finally with Captain Jack dead bug, and he's about to try copper fungicide. I don't know what advice to give him since I am thousands of miles away, can anyone please help?

Sweet Tart Mango

(http://s18.postimg.cc/im306d3kl/leaf_damage_Ong.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/im306d3kl/)


(http://s3.postimg.cc/xjm8151wf/leaf_damage_Ong2.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/xjm8151wf/)


Coconut Cream Mango

(http://s29.postimg.cc/h5owpreur/leaf_damage_coconut_cream.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/h5owpreur/)

mod edit: Please don't post in caps.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: nullzero on April 03, 2014, 05:34:52 PM
Looks like salts/fertilizer burn, or possibly burn from neem oil on the plant. Might be an issue of doing too much to the trees and poor quality water. The trees don't look like they may survive, if they do I am sure the trees will be stunted.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mangosurf on April 03, 2014, 06:19:51 PM
I agree it seems like fertilizer burn in combination with neem oil burn.  I didn't recommend all the chemicals I think he panicked when the trees started to decline. The trees are pretty much gonners  :( I just suggested to water the trees more often like 1-2 times per week and make sure there is a 6in think layer of mulch with a 2-3ft radius around the trunk of the tree. Also give the trees some fish fertilizer every other week. Is there anything else that could help at this point?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gunnar429 on April 03, 2014, 07:11:13 PM
sadly, i think they need a mango priest for last rites. sorry to hear!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: pj1881 (Patrick) on April 03, 2014, 07:13:58 PM
http://youtu.be/WChTqYlDjtI (http://youtu.be/WChTqYlDjtI)

Looks like missed waterings and a lot of over love.. May they rest in peace...  :'(
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gunnar429 on April 03, 2014, 07:18:44 PM
classy, patrick!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: simon_grow on April 03, 2014, 07:21:02 PM
Yup agree, looks like fertilizer burn, or something with the roots. Did you gradually adapt the tree to full sun? Also, newly planted young trees may need more frequent waterings during the establishment period. Did your dad happen to let any of the trees hold fruit?
Simon
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mangosurf on April 03, 2014, 07:33:39 PM
Simon,

None of the trees held fruit. I am baffled at how these trees keep dying. I was home for Christmas and they looked healthy and were pushing growth. I am shocked to see the condition they are in now and am trying to figure out how it happened.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: nullzero on April 03, 2014, 08:22:06 PM
I suggest starting over, this time work on amending the soil. Build it up with good compost and organic matter. Then plant next spring after some good rains. Try to water in the areas with none chlorinated water from now until planting.

Want to focus on building up earth worms, soil humus, and beneficial microbes. While doing this flushing the salts and excess fertilizer in the areas.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: ClayMango on April 03, 2014, 08:36:11 PM
[url]http://youtu.be/WChTqYlDjtI[/url] ([url]http://youtu.be/WChTqYlDjtI[/url])

Looks like missed waterings and a lot of over love.. May they rest in peace...  :'(



I salute you Patrick for the great "reveille" tribute to the fallen Mango trees. One of the highest Honors of tribute!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: pj1881 (Patrick) on April 03, 2014, 08:42:58 PM
[url]http://youtu.be/WChTqYlDjtI[/url] ([url]http://youtu.be/WChTqYlDjtI[/url])

Looks like missed waterings and a lot of over love.. May they rest in peace...  :'(



I salute you Patrick for the great "reveille" tribute to the fallen Mango trees. One of the highest Honors of tribute!


We bestow this high honor to those who were taken far before their prime.. May they be remembered for their bravery in the harsh desert heat without several inches of mulch and daily watering for the duration of the apparent drought.  They wont be forgotten.. Now pony up that credit card, lets get shopping!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gunnar429 on April 03, 2014, 10:07:37 PM


We bestow this high honor to those who were taken far before their prime.. May they be remembered for their bravery in the harsh desert heat without several inches of mulch and daily watering for the duration of the apparent drought.  They wont be forgotten.. Now pony up that credit card, lets get shopping!
[/quote]

That's what i'm talking about....just like a jazz funeral in new orleans....it was sad to see you go, but we had a helluva time knowing ya!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mangosurf on April 04, 2014, 07:12:45 AM
What about using a De-chlorination filter for the garden hose similar to this http://www.allfilters.com/gardenfilters/waterfilters/rainshower-garden-gro (http://www.allfilters.com/gardenfilters/waterfilters/rainshower-garden-gro) to remove the chlorine from the terrible tap water. And a long water soak around the plant with enough de-clorinated water to leach out the salt build up. Then applying some gypsum around the tree extending it out 2 feet from the trunk and watering in 1- 2 cups of it. Will Gypsum help to loosen up the soil so that it can leach out the salts better? I think he needs to do a soils analysis to determine what the problem is otherwise more trees are gonna end up dead which is a major waste of time, money, and water.

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mangosurf on April 04, 2014, 07:56:14 AM
Here is an article I found from the University of Georgia on amending saline or sodic soils
http://www.caes.uga.edu/Publications/pubDetail.cfm?pk_id=8004 (http://www.caes.uga.edu/Publications/pubDetail.cfm?pk_id=8004)



We bestow this high honor to those who were taken far before their prime.. May they be remembered for their bravery in the harsh desert heat without several inches of mulch and daily watering for the duration of the apparent drought.  They wont be forgotten.. Now pony up that credit card, lets get shopping!


That's what i'm talking about....just like a jazz funeral in new orleans....it was sad to see you go, but we had a helluva time knowing ya!
[/quote]





I don't think ponying up the credit card and buying new trees is the solution (I unfortunately have A LOT of experience with this) because they will just face the same fate unless I can figure out the source of the problem. I think it is the chlorinated, high salt, hard irrigation water in combination with saline or sodic soil. I'm really bummed out about this since I don't have the money to waste on trees as I am a broke masters student.  :(
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gunnar429 on April 04, 2014, 09:58:27 AM
Once established (3 months or so, mango trees shouldn't need much external watering, except in drought.  Plus, you could get a Chlorine filter for the hose (I just asked about it recently in a thread).  From my understanding, they are more likely to die from "over-care" than from neglect. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on April 04, 2014, 12:20:47 PM
I'm not sure what is going on with those burnt-looking trees.

Questions:

Have they been watered or fertilized with 20-20-20 (Miracle Grow, Peters, etc.) or other quickly soluble fertilizers (fast release)?   Not good--- especially during dry season without three-times a week watering of the quick-drying sandy soil.

Were they planted in Black Kow or other rich, mucky compost?  Not good for mangos.



Growing-tip die-back can be from disease or pests, or from mineral deficiencies:  not enough Copper, Boron, Calcium, Zinc.
The plan to spray with Copper is probably a good idea--- for one or two applications, but avoid frequent repetitions.

The above-mentioned recommendation to apply Calcium Sulfate (Gypsum), is also a good idea.  Our deep sandy soils are usually deficient in Calcium, and everything else.  This Calcium deficiency is exacerbated when all the other fertilizer elements are applied without Calcium.

The above-mentioned recommendation to decrease Chlorine in water may also be helpful (I'm not sure).  [Fluoride is bad too]
Avoid using swimming pool water on sensitive plants, such as Lychees and Jaboticabas.  Maybe mangos?

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mangosurf on April 04, 2014, 12:44:34 PM
Guanabanus,

Is it best to just plant mango trees straight into sandy soil? When I planted these trees I mixed 50/50 native soil and potting soil mix. What do you think is causing the rust color in the midriff of the leaves?  The trees were fertilized with Citrus & Fruit Tree Food 7-3-3  and some fish fertilizer 5-1-1 once the weather warmed up in February.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on April 05, 2014, 12:04:56 AM
Those fertilizers are probably better than 20-20-20, but notice that 7+5 = 12% Nitrogen , which is high for mango, versus 3 + 1 = 4% Potassium, which is extremely low[assuming you used equal amounts of each of the two products].  The middle number, Phosphate, is O.K.

Yes, root-pruning, then placement into a plain sand hole, leaving a berm to hold water,  is what is generally advocated for mangos.

I often add a little Calcium Sulfate and a little "organic" fertilizer containing Mycorrhizae and beneficial soil bacteria.  I haven't proved that there is a benefit.

Beyond the water-retention berm, in the 3-foot radius where sod has been removed, I add about an inch of light garden soil (Lambert's), place conventional slow release fertilizer and organic fertilizer over the garden soil, and cover with mulch.   This makes an instant topsoil over the sand, favoring mango feeder roots there.

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: alexO on May 26, 2014, 03:26:20 PM
Can anyone help me identify what is wrong with this leaf? It is happening on a Coconut cream and a Carrie. It only affects some of the older leaves. My guess is some sort of deficiency but I can't figure it out.

Alex
(http://s30.postimg.cc/5lqvpevt9/IMG_20140526_151917.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/5lqvpevt9/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 26, 2014, 11:50:43 PM
A photo of the under side of the leaf might be helpful.

This is probably damage from feeding on the leaf by Thrips and / or Mites.  This happens a lot in dry weather when plants are stressed, and when rain doesn't wash pests off the foliage.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bangkok on May 27, 2014, 12:03:39 AM
To me this looks like a very old leaf that is very crispy and was going to drop next days.

I had loads of old leaves like that and they all dropped. If this is a defficiency i have no idea. To me it looked natural, leaves don't live forever.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: alexO on May 27, 2014, 07:19:23 PM
I can't upload a picture at the moment but I will asap. I did take a look at the back of the leaves and noticed that the affected leaves had tiny black spots. What do you think this could be?

Thanks for the help it is greatly appreciated!

Alex
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: alexO on May 28, 2014, 07:46:32 AM
Here are some pictures of the backs of the leaves.
(http://s23.postimg.cc/e40h45p93/IMG_20140527_174530.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/e40h45p93/)

(http://s27.postimg.cc/60fyq0ftb/IMG_20140527_174512.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/60fyq0ftb/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 28, 2014, 08:09:45 AM
It does look like typical spring-time damage by thrips and mites.  I don't see any there now.
They may have been washed off by heavy rain, heavy irrigation, or perhaps you already sprayed them?
Predatory insects may also have worked there, eating the pests.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: alexO on May 28, 2014, 08:44:38 AM
Thanks so much, I have been thinking that it was some sort of nutrient deficiency. What should I look for in the future? If I do find anything what's the best option for dealing with them?

Alex
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 28, 2014, 02:12:32 PM
Spray hard with water once or twice a week in dry weather.  Be sure to hit the undersides of the leaves.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mangosurf on June 02, 2014, 11:02:43 AM
Here is an update of the before and after pictures of my dying mango tree. It basically died to just above the graft but the rootstock is very healthy and pushing growth. Is there any way to try and stimulate growth in the grafted portion of the tree? Or is it worth trying to graft another scion to the rootstock? Maybe I should just trash this tree but I hate to lose the money.

(http://s29.postimg.cc/qb6rwc2c3/leaf_damage_Ong2.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/qb6rwc2c3/)


(http://s15.postimg.cc/m8i0a3yuv/Spirit_of_76_Coming_Back.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/m8i0a3yuv/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on June 02, 2014, 11:10:11 AM
Tough to see where the graft union is however if that is all rootstock growth and there is not growth above ghe graft, money may have a 'll ready been lost.  You could try grafting on to the main rootstock or if not so inclined,  trash it and start over.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomandan on June 07, 2014, 11:15:17 AM
Does this look like fertilizer burn?
And is it only nitrogen that will burn?  Or can potassium and phosphorus burn in excessive quantities?

Over the last few months I've thrown everything I could think of at this little tree, which did not flush at all during 2013.
So the damage is self-inflicted, I suspect.

I had thought that organic fertilizer, being slow-acting, would not burn.   Wrong?

Luckily the newest growth looks fine.




(http://s28.postimg.cc/8pnaxvmft/Burned.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/8pnaxvmft/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on June 07, 2014, 11:33:35 PM
Mangomandan,

Looks more like powdery mildew damage, which would have occurred during mildly cool nights--- in the 60's --- which we had quite a few of not too long ago.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Dogmatix on June 15, 2014, 12:39:44 PM
Hi, I am new to this forum and we recently planted an Alfonso Mango a couple of months ago in our backyard. This is our first experience with planting a mango tree -it is a 15 gallon and we were told to plant it in full sun, with the pot and just cut the base open which we did. It did ok for a couple of weeks but recently, it is looking diseased and I'm afraid it's not going to survive!!

We live in san diego - I read some great posts from folks who have mango trees in So Cal. I've attached some pictures. I would love your help and recommendations to revive this tree.

Questions
1. Can the tree be revived?
2. Should we remove it from the ground and move it to a pot?
3. Wrong fertilizer probably used - should I repot with new soil and add liquid fish emulsion?
4. Is it diseased? If yes, any recommendations to help?

(http://s15.postimg.cc/7qy6bl79z/20140615_090940.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/7qy6bl79z/)

(http://s15.postimg.cc/gahk9cfmf/20140615_091000.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/gahk9cfmf/)

(http://s15.postimg.cc/i3p2beq6v/20140615_091030.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/i3p2beq6v/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: puglvr1 on June 15, 2014, 01:06:57 PM

" with the pot and just cut the base open which we did. It did ok "

I've never heard advise like this before...its best to remove the pot entirely and plant it inground at or just slightly above the soil level (so the trunk is not below the soil...

Do you remember what type of fertilizer you used? Young mango trees especially newly planted do not need fertilizer for a few weeks/months after transplanting unless its a small amount of "slow fertilizer". After about 6 weeks or so you can give them some Fish emulsion and Kelp at half strength and when you see new growths you can start adding some slow release fertilizer around the drip line...

Watering the newly planted tree on a regular basis is also very important especially if its been hot and dry?

You can try very carefully dig it back back and remove the plastic pot and replant it...at this point you don't have anything to lose...water it well and keep the soil "moist" not overly wet or soggy...Only fertilizer lightly once you see new growths...

Oh, and remove the blooms also...

Good luck!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: simon_grow on June 15, 2014, 01:51:02 PM
I've heRd that type of advice before but what they meant was to cut the pot off and remove it before planting. A newly planted tree shouldn't be fertilized for a while and it looks like its fertilizer burn on your tree. Your tree should recover if the damage is not too severe.

I would pull up your plant and flush it if you fertilized it and then replant in native soil only removing any fertilizer that you added to the planting hole. Check the moisture of the soil before you water. It's supposed to be cloudy for the next week so this may help with the transplant shock. Good luck and please keep us updated.
 
Simon
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Dogmatix on June 15, 2014, 04:08:01 PM
Thank you for the responses. I did replant without the plastic pot. I used a mixture of native soil and the soil the plant came in. I tried washing out as much fertilizer as I could. Let's hope I see new growth in 6-8 weeks. Will keep you posted.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomanic12 on June 17, 2014, 12:44:31 PM
Bad water, bad water bad wa T .........ER   B...A...D W...AATT.......er
 
I bet you are watering with city water  ie: Chlorinated water if you continue this the tree will die .
Get yourself a hose end filter to get rid of the chlorine / chloramime.

I have seen this before in my mangoes in the past, they all eventually died  until  i started to use a filter to get rid of the chlorine


Start with the water , no more fertilizers , get that filter to water with  and you will see improvement. From my experience fruit trees hate chlorine. They want pure or rain water
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangoprofessor on June 29, 2014, 07:05:26 PM
Hello tropical fruit lovers:  I am frequently asked to do presentations for garden clubs and other gardening organization get-togethers.  At a presentation last week a number of those present were talking about planting mango trees.   I was asked to give suggestions on what to do to protect young mango trees when Winter comes.  My first suggestion was to get 4 tree stakes like the ones in the picture that I used to support my large tree fern when I moved it.  You can get these tree stakes at Home Depot, Lowes or most nurseries.  They are round, about 2 inches in diameter and 8 feet long.  This suggestion applies to all young trees that are planted in the ground and will work for papaya, guava, etc as well as mango trees.   Drive the four stakes into the ground to form a square with your young mango tree in the center of the square.  Leave enough space to clear the widest branches.  Pick up several cheap drop cloth type painting tarps that will form a good cover for your young tree.  When Winter comes and a freeze is predicted for your area, cover the tree over night and remove the tarp after sunrise.

(http://s21.postimg.cc/kazourgxv/Tree_fern_braces.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/kazourgxv/)

A second option is to use your old Christmas lights and wrap the young tree as if you were decorating it for Christmas.  A young tree may only require one string of Christmas lights.  An older tree might need a couple of light strings.  You MUST use the older incandescent type of Christmas lights because they produce heat.  The new Christmas lights are cheaper to run but they are cold and will do nothing but make your tree look pretty.  The main advantage of using your old outdated Christmas tree lights from the garage rafters besides the price is that you can wrap the tree before any freeze is predicted and leave the lights on the tree until there is no longer any frost danger.  If you don't still have your old Christmas tree lights, hit a few garage sales or check out the neighborhood to still if anyone has left theirs on the house from last year. If you see a house with the lights still on the house, knock on the door and you might get a string of lights for free!  When a freeze is predicted just run out your good quality extension cord, plug the lights in and know that your tree will not only look pretty but be safe from the freeze.

(http://s27.postimg.cc/inrvgxanz/Christmas_tree_lights.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/inrvgxanz/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Californiatropicals on July 07, 2014, 10:17:26 PM
Hey everyone!

I need help

I have two mango trees. One is timotayo, one is Keitt. Keitt hasn't pushed any foliage growth this year, only flowers and 3 mangoes!

Here is the keitt
(http://i1243.photobucket.com/albums/gg545/dvaldez1286/keittmango_zpsa4532242.jpg) (http://s1243.photobucket.com/user/dvaldez1286/media/keittmango_zpsa4532242.jpg.html)

It's pushed flowers twice, and it's about to flower a 3rd time even though it already has mangoes on it! how do I get it to grow foliage?

(http://i1243.photobucket.com/albums/gg545/dvaldez1286/timotyao_zpsead2df8e.jpg) (http://s1243.photobucket.com/user/dvaldez1286/media/timotyao_zpsead2df8e.jpg.html)

this is the timotayo, it aborted flowers and pushed growth


thanks for any help!

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on July 07, 2014, 11:00:49 PM
Remove fruits, to make growth possible.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Californiatropicals on July 07, 2014, 11:23:31 PM
Remove fruits, to make growth possible.

Is that my only option? lol I wanted to remove the fruits since they set, but also want to try a northern california grown mango... UGH!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gunnar429 on July 08, 2014, 10:05:12 AM
many of us share your sentiment, but it just doesn't make sense.  Maybe another member can hook you up with a fruit.  It's agonizing, but your tree will suffer, all for a few fruit that may not even ripen correctly.  Stay strong.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Californiatropicals on July 08, 2014, 02:38:21 PM
many of us share your sentiment, but it just doesn't make sense.  Maybe another member can hook you up with a fruit.  It's agonizing, but your tree will suffer, all for a few fruit that may not even ripen correctly.  Stay strong.


Thanks for the support in these  hard time, brotha! lol  So will completely removing the fruit stop it's flowering process too? Can I leave one fruit?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on July 08, 2014, 06:38:36 PM
Californiatropicals:  Har is one of the most knowledgeable people on the forum for caring for trees.  The fruit takes energy away from the tree to grow.  The more energy you take away, the less it will have to grow. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on July 14, 2014, 07:19:01 AM
Last week Sunday I picked up a Julie mango tree from the local nursery, and I planted it on Wednesday.  It looked like it was doing great, but the past couple days I noticed some flowers turning brown.  I'm afraid it's infected with anthracnose or something else is making my tree unhappy.  Or is this normal?  Can a fungus infection happen so quickly (roughly 4 days)?  Can someone take a look at the pics I took today and let me know.  BTW the 1st pic is just to give perspective of the size of the tree, and the last 2 are zoomed in on the brown blossom.

Note about the soil conditions:
When I planted the tree in the ground, I used the soil the plant was in, and used some top soil around the hole.  Plus there's about 2-3 inches of topsoil on top of the original soil the plant was growing in.  Additionally, when digging the hole there was about 6 inches of soil before I hit the bedrock.  Not sure if any of this makes a difference.


(http://s8.postimg.cc/6cocpdmg1/20140711_134500.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/6cocpdmg1/)

(http://s8.postimg.cc/byartfn4x/20140714_065546.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/byartfn4x/)

(http://s8.postimg.cc/demabkq1t/20140714_065636.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/demabkq1t/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on July 14, 2014, 08:18:55 AM
Dont worry about the blooms, irrelevant at this point.

My concern is a ll the potting soil you added and specifically on top of tge plant.  You should never sdd soil on top of the plsnt.  I would like to see a picture of the base of the trunk and the graft in relationship to the soil level.

Where in Florida are you located?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on July 14, 2014, 08:23:30 AM
Yes, Antracnose fungus on the blooms.

It is too soon to allow fruiting.   If any fruit sets, remove with entire bloom spike when fruit is pea-sized.

Pull away the excess soil from the trunk--- until you can see the top root connections to the trunk.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on July 14, 2014, 08:34:39 AM
Thanks for the replies guys!  I took some pics of the graft in relation to the soil. 

I'm based in Pembroke Pines.

How much top soil should I remove?  I'm a newb, and not sure what "top root connections to the trunk" means.  Does that mean remove all the top soil until I get to the top of the original soil the plant was potted in?  Would it be ok to put a fast draining potting mix on top or just remove the top soil and let it be?

(http://s29.postimg.cc/95xcucxar/20140714_082608.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/95xcucxar/)

(http://s29.postimg.cc/xxwz1lehf/20140714_082638.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/xxwz1lehf/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on July 14, 2014, 10:08:36 AM
Thanks for the replies guys!  I took some pics of the graft in relation to the soil. 

I'm based in Pembroke Pines.

How much top soil should I remove?  I'm a newb, and not sure what "top root connections to the trunk" means.  Does that mean remove all the top soil until I get to the top of the original soil the plant was potted in?  Would it be ok to put a fast draining potting mix on top or just remove the top soil and let it be?


Top root connections are also known as crown roots.  Yes, never want to add soil/potting mix on top of the level of the soil in the pot (except in extereme cases where for some odd reason the pot had lost a lot of soil and roots were exposed, but that is the  outlier, not the norm).


Would it be ok to put a fast draining potting mix on top or just remove the top soil and let it be?


As stated, do not add any top soil, potting mix, etc. to the top of what was the level in the pot.  Ultimately, it would have been best to plant the tree where the soil level in the pot was 2" - 3" ABOVE the ground's soil level. 

Adfditional care:  Enlarge your tree ring to about 3 feet out from the trunk, leave about 12" - 18" bare and then lay 6" - 8" of pure cypress mulch (preferable grade A -- can be purchased at The Bushel Stop, stay away from mulch from any of the "big box stores").  Hose water daily (a very good soaking), in either early morning or late afternoon/early evening, for the forst month and then lighter hose watering mixed with irrigation if you have an irrigation system, 4 -5 days a week depending on how much rain you are getting.  Standard irrigation systems are not enough for newly planted trees as they irrigation system is meant to water in sod, and will only have an effect on the top 2" - 3" or so.  Fertilize with 8-3-9 or a high quality palm fertilizer after the first 30 days.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on July 14, 2014, 11:04:23 AM
OK thanks for the tips!  I'll remove the top layer of soil today ASAP.  After I remove the top level of soil, it might be a couple inches below ground soil level.  If it is, it won't be by much.  Is that ok?

The Bushel Shop is a bit of a drive.  I'll ask a local nursery if they have any Grade A pure cypress mulch. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on July 14, 2014, 01:17:43 PM
OK thanks for the tips!  I'll remove the top layer of soil today ASAP.  After I remove the top level of soil, it might be a couple inches below ground soil level.  If it is, it won't be by much.  Is that ok?

The Bushel Shop is a bit of a drive.  I'll ask a local nursery if they have any Grade A pure cypress mulch.

The cypress mulch from Home Depot or Lowes is fine. I've been using it for years with no issue.

Why might the top of the roots be a couple of inches below ground soil level? Did you plant your tree deeper than it was in the container? Always try to plant your trees at least an inch or two higher than the ground level. Also, in S FL sand, you don't need to amend the soil when planting mangos.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on July 14, 2014, 01:34:52 PM
OK thanks for the tips!  I'll remove the top layer of soil today ASAP.  After I remove the top level of soil, it might be a couple inches below ground soil level.  If it is, it won't be by much.  Is that ok?

The Bushel Shop is a bit of a drive.  I'll ask a local nursery if they have any Grade A pure cypress mulch.

The cypress mulch from Home Depot or Lowes is fine. I've been using it for years with no issue.

Why might the top of the roots be a couple of inches below ground soil level? Did you plant your tree deeper than it was in the container? Always try to plant your trees at least an inch or two higher than the ground level. Also, in S FL sand, you don't need to amend the soil when planting mangos.

Much comes with weed seed, insects and has a tendency to be moldy or having fungal issues.  Bottom line, its "dirty" and not fresh.  Bushel Stop's may be more expensive but it is fresher and cleaner.  Just my 2 pennies...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on July 14, 2014, 02:44:08 PM
Yes I planted it slightly below ground level initially which l hope I can work around with some of the input here (thanks for all the help so far!)? 

I carefully removed most of the topsoil this afternoon but then it started raining.  Hopefully not too much rain water is trapped on top.  Initially, I planted the tree on a slight decline, with the thinking that water will naturally roll down the slant and into the lake water about 10 - 15 feet behind it, instead of having the tree sitting in a pool of water.  I hope that theory helps right now haha!

After calling around,I'm making the trip to the Bushel Shop tomorrow and picking up the mulch.  Lots of places don't have unmixed Cypress Mulch.  The nearest one I found will take me the same time as driving to Bushel Shop (excluding Lowes, HD etc). 

So once I have the mulch, I'll dig an additional 2-3 feet around the plant, remove as much of the topsoil as I can (being careful not remove much of the soil the plant was potted with), and fill that with the mulch.  This still won't fix the depth issue though.  Should I do anything about that?

Thanks again for everyone's help!


EDIT:  Just ran outside quickly to check the mango plant, and nope, no pool of water resting on my mango plant! :)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on July 14, 2014, 04:41:51 PM
Yes I planted it slightly below ground level initially which l hope I can work around with some of the input here (thanks for all the help so far!)? 

I carefully removed most of the topsoil this afternoon but then it started raining.  Hopefully not too much rain water is trapped on top.  Initially, I planted the tree on a slight decline, with the thinking that water will naturally roll down the slant and into the lake water about 10 - 15 feet behind it, instead of having the tree sitting in a pool of water.  I hope that theory helps right now haha!

After calling around,I'm making the trip to the Bushel Shop tomorrow and picking up the mulch.  Lots of places don't have unmixed Cypress Mulch.  The nearest one I found will take me the same time as driving to Bushel Shop (excluding Lowes, HD etc). 

So once I have the mulch, I'll dig an additional 2-3 feet around the plant, remove as much of the topsoil as I can (being careful not remove much of the soil the plant was potted with), and fill that with the mulch.  This still won't fix the depth issue though.  Should I do anything about that?

Thanks again for everyone's help!


EDIT:  Just ran outside quickly to check the mango plant, and nope, no pool of water resting on my mango plant! :)

If you didn't break up the root ball, and assuming it was intact when you removed from the bot, you can gently dig far enough around the tree and excavate the rootball undisturbed.  Then back fill the hole with some of the soil so that when planted the pot soil level is a couple/few inches higher than ground level.  Then follow the steps as described above.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on July 14, 2014, 09:36:02 PM
Much comes with weed seed, insects and has a tendency to be moldy or having fungal issues.  Bottom line, its "dirty" and not fresh.  Bushel Stop's may be more expensive but it is fresher and cleaner.  Just my 2 pennies...

I haven't had that issue with Home Depot's cypress mulch in all the years of using it. Maybe they have a better source now than when you last purchased.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on July 14, 2014, 10:02:20 PM
The Bushel Stop mulch does smell really good, and is a little cheaper when one is near enough.

I usually use Home Depot mulch, because it is usually closer.   I prefer the No-Float / Natural Cypress mulch.   Some customers insist on the red junk.   When it rots, the soil is red!   Healthy?

Nutritionally better, and cheaper,  than any of the above, is fresh tree-surgeon mulch--- if you can use a hot-steaming, full-dump-truck load at a time.  It's better because it contains leaves, as well as wood.   However it is highly variable, and so doesn't always leave an even, neat appearance.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on July 21, 2014, 04:39:51 PM
I have some questions about the earlier instructions on the size of the hole for my Julie tree...hoping someone can chime in and help clarify please. 

Quote
Adfditional care:  Enlarge your tree ring to about 3 feet out from the trunk, leave about 12" - 18" bare and then lay 6" - 8" of pure cypress mulch


Question 1)  I increased the diameter of the ring today, and am at 18" currently from the trunk, so the hole is 36' (3 ft) in diameter total.  Do I need to extend it to 3 ft from the trunk so a hole of 6 ft diameter total or is the 3 ft total diameter good?

Question 2)  Is the mulch just a layer of 6" - 8" deep, and then use it to fill the hole going out from the trunk and roots to the edges of the hole?  Or do I keep it at 6" - 8" in depth with mulch, and fill the hole outwards from the trunk, then stop and leave 12" - 18" of complete empty space, so there will be a gap of empty space around the mulch?

Question 3)  Should I remove the blossom that has anthracnose now that there's a small fruit?

Thanks for any responses guys  8)

EDIT:  Added pics :)  ...Note pic 2 is of the small fruit to give you indication of size of it.

(http://s15.postimg.cc/rln5y6vw7/20140721_183741.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/rln5y6vw7/)

(http://s15.postimg.cc/s9w0h4ulz/20140721_183759.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/s9w0h4ulz/)

(http://s15.postimg.cc/qxebf8x6f/20140721_183820.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/qxebf8x6f/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on July 21, 2014, 06:54:25 PM
I have some questions about the earlier instructions on the size of the hole for my Julie tree...hoping someone can chime in and help clarify please. 

Quote
Adfditional care:  Enlarge your tree ring to about 3 feet out from the trunk, leave about 12" - 18" bare and then lay 6" - 8" of pure cypress mulch


Question 1)  I increased the diameter of the ring today, and am at 18" currently from the trunk, so the hole is 36' (3 ft) in diameter total.  Do I need to extend it to 3 ft from the trunk so a hole of 6 ft diameter total or is the 3 ft total diameter good?

Question 2)  Is the mulch just a layer of 6" - 8" deep, and then use it to fill the hole going out from the trunk and roots to the edges of the hole?  Or do I keep it at 6" - 8" in depth with mulch, and fill the hole outwards from the trunk, then stop and leave 12" - 18" of complete empty space, so there will be a gap of empty space around the mulch?

Question 3)  Should I remove the blossom that has anthracnose now that there's a small fruit?

Thanks for any responses guys  8)

EDIT:  Added pics :)  ...Note pic 2 is of the small fruit to give you indication of size of it.



Check out some of these posts to see images of what your tree should generally look like with mulch. http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?action=profile;area=showposts;sa=topics;u=1 (http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?action=profile;area=showposts;sa=topics;u=1)

You can remove that entire panicle now.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on July 21, 2014, 07:17:20 PM
Thanks for the pics and info!  Looks like I need to make the ring a little bigger.  I'll take it out another 12", from the center.  So 60" (5 ft) total diameter for the ring.  Then I'll remove the panicle and then raise the plant so that it's 2" - 3" above the surrounding mulch.



Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on July 21, 2014, 08:48:42 PM
No need to raise the plant more.  It is already too high.

Add some sandy soil to cover the roots.   Only a little bit of root should be visible where it comes out at the base of the above-ground part of the trunk,  Leaving the whole top mass of roots uncovered the way I see in this picture will kill all those roots, and probably the tree.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on July 21, 2014, 09:54:23 PM
Ok thanks Guanabanus.  I'm glad I don't have to raise it then.  I was worried about disturbing it some more. 

What do you think of this approach?  Extend the ring and fill it all in with mulch so that it's level with where the base meets the soil in the current picture.  Then with a small 6" diameter going around the trunk, add an inch or two of potting soil to protect the trunk.  My concern with doing that is putting soil on top again.

Basically I have top soil (Florida Nursery Mart brand), cypress mulch (Bushel Stop brand and unopened), and potting soil (Bushel Stop brand  and unopened) to work with.  I'd rather use what I have to fix it rather than going out again to buy more soil haha!!

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on July 22, 2014, 08:02:46 AM
Don't put soil on the trunk!   Only over the roots.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on July 22, 2014, 09:03:12 AM
That's what I was thinking too.  I've just finished my project.  I used 40% mulch / 40% potting soil / 20% top soil to fill the majority of the ring.  Then used a 50% / 50% potting soil to mulch mix around the base roots.  Finally added a layer of about 4 inches of mulch on top of that.  Let's see how my plant does!  Thanks for all the help.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomandan on July 28, 2014, 08:48:31 PM

(http://s15.postimg.cc/drk27ccmv/Lemon_Zest_with.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/drk27ccmv/)

Nearly all my LZ mangos are showing dark green blotching on the skin. After a couple days the blotch gets very dark.

It has not affected the quality of the fruit so far, but I'd be interested if someone can identify what is going on.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on July 28, 2014, 09:46:20 PM
Dan - that is normal,  classic characteristic of the LZ.  Nothing wrong at all.  Looks perfecto!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Ryansbrooks1991 on July 29, 2014, 11:31:04 AM
My otherwise healthy looking tree has newer leaves twisting what could the nutrient deficiency be? Also have an anthracnose problem not yet seen in leaves, but on the branches I notice the blackening istaking over. What are some suggestions for this grafted tree. Also notice a few odd shaped leaves, is that normal or another deficiency? This is a Carrie Graft.
 
(http://s3.postimg.cc/sxqzdz0y7/20140729_101437.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/sxqzdz0y7/)

(http://s3.postimg.cc/7qn8pyob3/20140729_101441.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/7qn8pyob3/)

(http://s3.postimg.cc/rwqqoujyn/20140729_101445.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/rwqqoujyn/)

(http://s3.postimg.cc/bj6r5p3tb/20140729_101455.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/bj6r5p3tb/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: TnTrobbie on July 29, 2014, 11:33:46 AM
Twisted leaves are normal for some varieties. Carrie included. Looks like a very healthy tree.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on July 29, 2014, 10:13:49 PM
Yes, all healthy.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Bigstick62 on August 03, 2014, 08:14:44 PM
Hi everyone:
Attached is a picture of a Cogshall Mango tree in my yard. As you can see the edges of the leaves have "burn marks" and have started to curl upwards although I have not used any fertilizer on the tree. Can anyone tell me what is going on here and what I can do to address the issue?
Thanks for all your help


(http://s28.postimg.cc/h2sjkx0h5/20140802_153540_A.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/h2sjkx0h5/)

Same thing seems to be happening on my Okrung mango tree


(http://s27.postimg.cc/bwht5sxvz/20140628_112521.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/bwht5sxvz/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 03, 2014, 10:18:58 PM
Both appear to have Powdery Mildew damage.  Severe deficiency of Potassium can also cause marginal firing.

The Okrung has something else going on--- probably a multiple deficiency, probably including Zinc, Copper, and Boron.   I'd give it a full micro-nutrient mix plus kelp extract, sprayed on the leaves, and a good mixed fertilizer on the ground, plus Calcium Sulfate (if there isn't already abundant Calcium in your soil).
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cornelis on August 08, 2014, 12:57:56 PM
Hi mango lovers,

I've attached some pictures of my 6 year old mango tree, living in the middle of Sweden. It is grown from seed and has spent the winters indoors and the summers outdoors. The height is just below 4 ft (1.10 m) and the branching at the top is from this summer. It looks quite good, but the low leaves of the tree have some strange symptoms of disease. On the back of the leaves there is a white mass, as in the 5th image. Also I think they are mottled as in the 4th image, but maybe that is just a sign of the leave aging. I have never given it any fertilizer but repotted it every year (at least). What do you think the problem is, fungus, bacterial spots or something else?

(http://s7.postimg.cc/5trciz8bb/2014_08_05_07_15_00.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/5trciz8bb/)

(http://s7.postimg.cc/5r7gw54nr/2014_08_05_07_15_17.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/5r7gw54nr/)

(http://s7.postimg.cc/alwkgodlj/2014_08_05_07_15_38.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/alwkgodlj/)

(http://s7.postimg.cc/aedixws0n/2014_08_05_07_26_19.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/aedixws0n/)

(http://s7.postimg.cc/5pxj2q2tz/2014_08_05_07_26_58.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/5pxj2q2tz/)

(http://s7.postimg.cc/b02hu0n2v/2014_08_08_18_08_31.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/b02hu0n2v/)

(http://s7.postimg.cc/t999obs2f/2014_08_08_18_09_03.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/t999obs2f/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: BrettBorders on August 10, 2014, 11:06:27 AM
Here is my baby Sweet Tart. It looked a bit battered when I bought it at the PB Rare Fruit council sale, but I chose it because it had the best branching structure of all that were for sale... and figured I could give it some TLC. It is finally flushing - a good sign.

(http://s29.postimg.cc/rdo3exd0j/sweet_tart_1.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/rdo3exd0j/)
(http://s24.postimg.cc/3zrtgv9dd/sweet_tart_2.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/3zrtgv9dd/)
(http://s13.postimg.cc/v6rjfg2ir/sweet_tart_3.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/v6rjfg2ir/)

It has curly leaves - kind of like a warped records - with ash-white / brown tips that look dead. Some spots and dead holes in the leaf.

My goal with this plant is to get it healthy and move it in to a big container. If I could get 10 mangos a year from it, I would be happy. More would be a score!

1.) What should I do, if anything, to address the leaf defects?
2.) What kind of fertilizer or nutrition is recommended for mangos in containers? Do I need some sort of liquid?

I currently only have 8-3-9 granules from Excalibur.





Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 10, 2014, 11:41:57 AM
The leaves may have been damaged by wind or by being sprayed too hard when the leaves were very tender.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: PurpleAlligator on September 01, 2014, 08:15:27 PM
So since I moved into my new property a couple months ago, I've been working on my goal of getting a lot of mango varieties in the ground.  I bought 5 at the Fairchild mango festival and another 19 from Pine Island.  Several of them have been under attack, and some are doing great.  The Vallenato I bought from Fairchild is doing great, flushing and no damage at all.  The Angie has been in the ground the same 6 weeks and any new growth has been attacked. 

My longan caretaker was here Saturday and showed him the damaged plants still in pots and he immediately said "son caracoles" (snails).  He said they come up at night and feed on the leaves and new growth and are back in the soil in the daytime. 

Some of the leaves were curled like in some of the pictures I see here.  He said he was going to spray them for me (he was fumigating the longans for ants and whitefly).  I had to leave so I didn't see if he actually  was able to.

But I went to home depot and bought this snail bait today.  Does anyone have experience with this being effective?

(http://s8.postimg.cc/kss38rc41/20140901_193332.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/kss38rc41/)

I was out trimming the grass around the trees and putting down the snail bait at dusk today and what did I see on the Alphonso mango I planted yesterday but this snail on a top leaf of the Alphonso, confirming his diagnosis.

(http://s16.postimg.cc/8csxrc21d/20140901_192205.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/8csxrc21d/)

Here's the Angie that I'm still hoping is going to make it after being ravaged.  New flushes have been killed off almost immediately.  The green grass around it are just freshly cut clippings on top of the mulch ring.

(http://s28.postimg.cc/kmpyr87jt/20140901_193046.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/kmpyr87jt/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on September 01, 2014, 08:30:34 PM
Snail baits containing Iron Phosphate are safe and effective.   I'm not familiar with the one shown.

Not all snails on plants are harming the plants--- some kinds actually survive by cleaning algae and fungi and bacteria off the leaves.

I don't recall seeing snail damage on mangos, but then I have never been around Giant African Snails.

I hope your spray man is certified to spray;  it is the law when working for hire or on some else's property.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: PurpleAlligator on September 01, 2014, 08:59:52 PM
Snail baits containing Iron Phosphate are safe and effective.   I'm not familiar with the one shown.

Not all snails on plants are harming the plants--- some kinds actually survive by cleaning algae and fungi and bacteria off the leaves.

I don't recall seeing snail damage on mangos, but then I have never been around Giant African Snails.

I hope your spray man is certified to spray;  it is the law when working for hire or on some else's property.

It's an iron phosphate snail bait.  Of course he is certified. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: PurpleAlligator on September 17, 2014, 09:59:46 AM
Since I've started using snail bait I'm starting to find snail carcasses on plants and around the area.  Here's one I found this morning near some 3 gallon mango plants I haven't planted yet and new growth was being attacked.

Har - I'm new to the board but it looks like you know quite a bit on the topic.  A lot of my new 25 mango plants have not gotten off to great starts, can I reach out to you for some advice off the board?

(http://s29.postimg.cc/pjqpwwflv/P1020028.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/pjqpwwflv/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on September 17, 2014, 10:47:57 AM
Answers which I choose to give here on the forum are free.

Private consultations on phone or in person are $30 per hour.   561 523-6599
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: davidgarcia899 on September 17, 2014, 01:32:20 PM
Hey Purple Alligator, I am in your area 19997 sw 190th street and I have what is predominately a longan grove.

I can tell you two things.

1) Longans don't need to be sprayed for whitefly or ants, that is a huge waste of money and terrible for the environment. Longans in our area are basically care free as long as your occasionally fertilize and prune. And trust me I know, I have over 150 longan trees.

2) Its not snails, its 100%, my personal guarantee not snails. I accidentally introduced cuban snails onto my property and I have to deal with them constantly, but they do not touch mangos, not even seedlings that are sprouting, and trust me, seedlings are snails favorite snack.

This next advice, is speculation, your curled leaves are possibly the result of fungal problems. Most people will tell you that you need to spray most you mangos with copper or some other anti fungal at least when they are young. Our area is not as mango friendly as you'd expect, the humidity levels and soil aren't ideal.

Sometimes curled leaves are the result of nutritional deficiencies, but I assume you already know to fertilize your mangos periodically with 8-3-9 and a chelate micronutrient blend, on our soil this is essential for good tree growth for most anything and does a world of good for mango in their first years.

Finally, sometimes the leafs just come out curled especially if its very windy and the trees are growing quickly, the new leaves are sensitive to wind.

If you are taking good care of your plants any curled leaves are not life threatening.

But, I can tell you without a doubt in my mind its not snails, and that you are wasting time fumigating your longans.

If you want pm and if I have some time, Ill pop by your place and tell you what I thing and you'd be more than welcome to look around my place.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: PurpleAlligator on September 17, 2014, 03:47:26 PM
David,

Thanks for the comments.  I would definitely like to have you come over and look around and meet you as well.  We are very close to each other.  I'll send you a pm.

I prefer a chemical free property.  I bought the property about 3 months ago and the caretaker has been handling the trees for many years now and uses chemical extensively.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on September 17, 2014, 07:14:13 PM
That's a good idea. You should offer email consultation.

Answers which I choose to give here on the forum are free.

Private consultations on phone or in person are $30 per hour.   561 523-6599
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: zands on September 18, 2014, 08:01:06 AM
Mr Har has a resume as in being the prime grafter and in charge of grafting operations at Zills for many years/ And for any newbies here Zills is the epicenter of mango grafting|propagation|distribution in the US and much of Latin America. Latin America as is selling thousands of small grafted saplings at a time to owners establishing new groves in places like Peru. So that yokels in New York can buy a $1 mango that will never taste good but has lots of red coloration that makes people buy them

Zills as in selling|sending|grafted trees to Pine Island Nursery many of the trees they distribute all over America and beyond
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on September 18, 2014, 02:44:05 PM
I believe Har's title at Zill's HPP was "Annona Breeder" :-), though I'm sure he was a man of many hats during his time there. But, that's just one slice of his resume.

Definitely worth the money for a consultation.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: zands on September 18, 2014, 03:37:56 PM
I believe Har's title at Zill's HPP was "Annona Breeder" :-), though I'm sure he was a man of many hats during his time there. But, that's just one slice of his resume.

Definitely worth the money for a consultation.

It was a fortuitous day when I was on your property in April and met Har who threw a few nuggets of wisdom at me. But even better was Mr Steve from Atlas roofing who gave me some roof  leak advice saving me $2000. He was working on your roof this fortunate day

The secret roof rescuing ingredient is______________________________tar sealant in the green bucket at HD_____________ applied in all the right places


Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: crazyforcherimoya on December 29, 2014, 06:47:36 PM
for the first time after relocating to Florida and getting bitten by the mango bug my mango trees are finally blooming. Do you recommend I spray the flowers with copper? They are Glenn, Mallika and Kent. If yes can you share with me instructions as how many ounces per gallon of water of the blue powder? Also I am reading I should not spray the fully open sprig but only the bloom while forming. Is that accurate? And how often? Thanks for any help
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 30, 2014, 01:18:51 AM
A product with Potassium phosphite or with Calcium phosphonate, mixed at less-than-maximum rate, would work better on already open bloom.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on January 23, 2015, 03:39:17 PM
It seems like the flowers on my lemon meringue are turning brown and drying up. More water? Was watering twice a week. Can post pics in a bit.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on January 23, 2015, 03:45:15 PM
Probably powdery mildew.  A picture would help.  If that is what it is, you need to spray with sulphur to address the problem.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on January 23, 2015, 03:52:29 PM
Probably powdery mildew.  A picture would help.  If that is what it is, you need to spray with sulphur to address the problem.

If PM, it may be too late for this season.

It also may just be that they are "drying up" and not setting any fruit.  As Harrry said, would need pictures.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mike T on January 23, 2015, 03:57:34 PM
There are a few other possible and less likely causes.Anthracnose will cause foliage to be effected and flowers to blacken.This is a worse problem when the plant has been wet too much.There are insect pests that mine stems, ruin flowers and cause blackening through attacking the tissues.A photo would help. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on January 23, 2015, 04:03:47 PM
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v123/pier_afficionado/20150123_154033.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/pier_afficionado/media/20150123_154033.jpg.html)
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v123/pier_afficionado/20150123_154043.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/pier_afficionado/media/20150123_154043.jpg.html)
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v123/pier_afficionado/20150123_154015.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/pier_afficionado/media/20150123_154015.jpg.html)
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v123/pier_afficionado/20150123_154052.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/pier_afficionado/media/20150123_154052.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on January 23, 2015, 04:04:28 PM
There are a few other possible and less likely causes.Anthracnose will cause foliage to be effected and flowers to blacken.This is a worse problem when the plant has been wet too much.There are insect pests that mine stems, ruin flowers and cause blackening through attacking the tissues.A photo would help.

I have seen pannicles attacked by anthracnose but the foliage virtually unscathed...but as you say, that is more of a black color appearance.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on January 23, 2015, 04:05:02 PM
Petals of the flowers are turning brown :( :( :'( :'( Does not look like powdery mildew, atleast not from pictures I have seen. Early mildew? Any hope?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on January 23, 2015, 04:06:29 PM
It is literally like brown shriveled when a plant dries out from not enough water, but only the little leaves of the flowers.  Watering weds and sundays. Too much? Tree has been in ground since last July.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on January 23, 2015, 04:08:37 PM
Those pics look fine.  I see many little mangoes set (see the green "BBs").  As with any sized tree, in the beginning stage, there will be way more little mangoes set than the tree will hold but there are a lot set right now.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on January 23, 2015, 04:16:01 PM
There are tons of bb's lol So the browning is just part of the fruiting process? Soil is pretty bone dry since last watering Weds about 2-3 inches down. Gonna mulch it next time I water. How often should I be watering, Once a week then? I have been playing with the rains too and skipping waterings if it rains. People think I am mad at work cuz if it is cloudy there I check the radar to see if water is going to hit my house LOL  Have not fertilized. SOOOOOOOOOOO new to this and hoping not to hamper my babies lol  I have never seen mango flowers up close and definetly have not checked on them every day during the flowering/fruiting season LMAO  All the trees around here are huge so only see the flowers from a distance. Thanks for your help Bullie
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on January 23, 2015, 04:21:38 PM
Are you watering with hose or sprinklers?  Some light watering is ok however if it has been in the ground for a year and a half, it is pretty much probably able to survive on its own.  Too much water will have ill effects on the mangoes developing.

Don't, I repeat DON'T fertilize now.  It would put the fruit at major risk and would most likely cause them to drop and the tree would focus its energy to vegatative flushes.  If it holds fruit, wait till the final harvest to fertilize.  If all mangoes drop and its holding nothing, then you can begin fertilizing at that time.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on January 23, 2015, 04:25:34 PM
Thanks, no I have not fertilized thanks to all the reading I did on here.  How often should I water trees that were planted last week? twice a week for next month and then once a week? I water with a wand and hose at the base. Also read not to water the leaves lol (lots of reading lately) 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on January 23, 2015, 06:54:41 PM
I don't see anything wrong with the flowers in the pictures posted. The ones that don't set fruit, and most of them won't, are just going to dry up and turn brown.

If the trees were just planted last week, twice a week for the first couple months is sufficient, once a week thereafter until about a year out and the trees are established. After that, just during drought periods (several weeks without rainfall or signs of drought stress).

Also, if you just planted these I would consider removing the fruit that they set so that the trees can establish itself better. Newly planted trees, even larger ones, that are allowed to carry fruit to maturity often won't grow well thereafter.

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bangkok on January 23, 2015, 08:28:06 PM
Looks good to me.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on January 23, 2015, 09:20:19 PM
Thanks. Peace of mind LOL Yeah this one is in its second fruiting season with me, last year I clipped all flowering/fruit spikes to let it focus on growing.  thanks again everyone for your insight.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on January 23, 2015, 09:58:24 PM
Thanks. Peace of mind LOL Yeah this one is in its second fruiting season with me, last year I clipped all flowering/fruit spikes to let it focus on growing.  thanks again everyone for your insight.

Depending on your soil and the weather,  i would recommend watering the newly planted trees an extra day or two per week (more with warmer drier weathers and depending if you have fast draing lighter sand soil).  Also, when you water, take the wand off the hose and water deep enough to get the water down to the entire root ball.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: GrassFlats on January 23, 2015, 10:03:14 PM
I don't see a problem at all.  The flowers that don't produce the bb size fruits will all turn brown and die.  That's whats happening to mine right now.  I wouldn't be worried
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on January 24, 2015, 11:51:36 AM
Tree survival and fruit retention are two different things.

When the top several inches of topsoil goes powdery dry, even well established trees will drop way more of their tiny fruits than would be the case if soil moisture were maintained--- even if the tree doesn't look wilted.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on January 24, 2015, 09:53:42 PM
thanks for the replies. Keeping a close eye and watering tomorrow. Was hoping for rain today to let nature do her thing,but no luck.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: ClayMango on January 25, 2015, 02:25:23 PM
yeah you have  some decent fruit set there....everything looks good
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FrankDrebinOfFruits on February 12, 2015, 12:34:37 PM
I have a Parvim mango. The new leaf growth is pale green and the leaves are young and very hard. They have a heavy plastic feel to them where as the older leaves also feel plastic like but not to this level.

Any ideas if this is an infection or nutrient deficiency? Or, is this normal for Parvim?

 
(http://s30.postimg.cc/hsxrb8ccd/20150210_174323_resized.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/hsxrb8ccd/)

(http://s7.postimg.cc/sixmw1nc7/20150210_174334_resized.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/sixmw1nc7/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 12, 2015, 08:46:21 PM
2nd picture:  I have never seen that--- very unusual Rococco or Van Goghesque swirls between the secondary veins.

I suggest that you contact a tissue-culture lab to propagate this as a novelty. 

It would also be good to have a university lab test this to see if it is a virus.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Doglips on February 13, 2015, 01:27:49 PM
It almost looks emaciated, with bulging veins.  A sport?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: dongeorgio on February 14, 2015, 07:29:01 PM
What could have caused the trunk to split like this on my Carrie?


(http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e337/Dongeorgio/FullSizeRendercopy_zps54df29be.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 15, 2015, 11:51:44 PM
How long ago did this happen?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on February 16, 2015, 11:09:58 AM
Maybe a reaction to the hot then cold weather spurts we've been seeing.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Doglips on February 16, 2015, 11:42:27 AM
To my uneducated eye, I'd say more fungal or bacterial.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: dongeorgio on February 16, 2015, 01:38:51 PM
I have no idea how long ago it happened but I just noticed it a few days ago.   I have segregated the tree just to be safe but, oddly enough, the rest of the tree looks great and it is now pushing a new flush of growth. 



Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on February 16, 2015, 08:14:33 PM
George,
I think the Carrie roots should be covered with soil and not visible.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gunnar429 on February 16, 2015, 09:46:32 PM
The good news is it happened to your Carrie, and not another prized variety  ;)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: dongeorgio on February 17, 2015, 08:52:58 PM
Good point Gunnar.  At least it was something that is easily replaceable.   This also provides another fine excuse to play hookie one day this week and go to Zills.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on February 17, 2015, 10:02:15 PM
I've had mango trees do that splitting thing shortly after a cold blast immediately preceded by warm weather. I just use it as an opportunity to lop the tree down below the splitting, and it comes back fine.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on February 23, 2015, 04:25:13 PM
Noticed this today after checking up on my mangoes after the cold spell. Is it early P.M.?  It is only on the pannicles, should I cut them off so it does not spread to the rest of the cogshall or my other trees? Spray? I was hoping to let fruit set this year, some small bb's on all the pannicles so far, and some more growth seems to be budding.  This sucks!!
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v123/pier_afficionado/20150223_1343021.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/pier_afficionado/media/20150223_1343021.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on February 23, 2015, 04:47:32 PM
I assume if it is PM spary sulfur? What is right or best kind? Willing to drive to help my tree.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gunnar429 on February 23, 2015, 05:09:00 PM
easy there, fisher.  You will have a reply in due time...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on February 23, 2015, 05:34:16 PM
Those other questions where after thoughts LOL I think Murahilin is gonna limit me to one question every 4 days pretty soon LMAO.  But you guys created this monster!!!!!! And I am STILL waiting to taste several fruits mentioned by you and a few others!! Caimito is next!  and then Abiu!!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on February 23, 2015, 06:28:10 PM
Its powdery mildew. Wettable sulfur works well, there are numerous brands. Most effective when started pre-emergence.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on February 23, 2015, 07:45:49 PM
Been a lot of powdery mildew this year. Bonide makes a good micronized sulfur.

I had previously been averse to fungicides, but after many years of watching powdery mildew, scab, and anthracnose ravage my mango crop, I finally threw in the towel and started spraying on a once every 2 weeks schedule. Huge difference in fruit set.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on February 23, 2015, 08:14:06 PM
Can Bonide be bought locally? Every 2 weeks year round? Should I spray my unaffected trees near by? None of them seem to have it, and the cogshall has at on ONE branch of ONE fruit spike.  Ugh this sucks.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gunnar429 on February 23, 2015, 08:38:51 PM
Bonide can be bought at home depot.  I believe You would only spray while a tree is flowering. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on February 23, 2015, 09:26:28 PM
So sulfur for PM. Should I spray other trees as well or wait and see if it spreads?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on March 02, 2015, 06:02:24 PM
How and should I get rid of/control these? Big legged plant bugs, leaf leg plant bugs, stink bugs?


(http://s15.postimg.cc/cm41vh2xj/20150302_092130_1.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/cm41vh2xj/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Dangermouse01 on March 02, 2015, 06:22:23 PM
How and should I get rid of/control these? Big legged plant bugs, leaf leg plant bugs, stink bugs?


([url]http://s15.postimg.cc/cm41vh2xj/20150302_092130_1.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/cm41vh2xj/[/url])


Leaf footed stink bug.
Squashing them works.

DM
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on March 02, 2015, 08:59:28 PM
Leaffooted Bug
Leptoglossus phyllopus (Linnaeus) 

http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/orn/leaffooted_bug.htm (http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/orn/leaffooted_bug.htm)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: sapote on March 02, 2015, 09:02:03 PM
So sulfur for PM. Should I spray other trees as well or wait and see if it spreads?

I was always using sulfur paste paint on (add water to sulfur dust) for PM with 70% effective, but my brother had used neem-oil and it looked much better.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on March 02, 2015, 09:30:33 PM
Thanks Bullie, thats exactly what I was looking for, an article like that. Found one but was not 100% if same critter since article was from Australia.  Well I guess war it is. I have had significant fruit dropping the last couple of days, and saw three of these buggers together this morning. Gonna get them before any more fruit gets affected.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on March 04, 2015, 06:42:00 PM
 :-\ Well have check every morning and afternoon since last post and these fruit sucker just vanished. Have not seen a single one......
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: davidgarcia899 on March 04, 2015, 10:23:31 PM
Leaf bugs don't do damage
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: jc on March 05, 2015, 05:40:13 AM
Insecticide soap worked for me.

How and should I get rid of/control these? Big legged plant bugs, leaf leg plant bugs, stink bugs?


([url]http://s15.postimg.cc/cm41vh2xj/20150302_092130_1.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/cm41vh2xj/[/url])


Leaf footed stink bug.
Squashing them works.

DM
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on March 05, 2015, 06:17:17 AM
Leaf bugs don't do damage

Not according to the articles I read. Said they can cause fruit to drop. Minor pest, but either way glad they are gone!!!  ;D
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on March 05, 2015, 12:00:22 PM
For westerners......

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74168.html (http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74168.html)

I personally just co-exist with them.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on March 05, 2015, 01:35:21 PM
For westerners......

[url]http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74168.html[/url] ([url]http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74168.html[/url])

I personally just co-exist with them.


"During most years, leaffooted bug populations are low enough that damage to gardens is tolerable and damage to landscape plants is negligible. "
Thanks for another good read on this issue.  This article a bit more in depth, and got this bit from it. Funny how it mentions tomato plants as a target, my mango trees are surrounded by tomato plants and have not seen one stink bug in the veggie raised boxes.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on March 05, 2015, 02:07:15 PM
For westerners......

[url]http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74168.html[/url] ([url]http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74168.html[/url])

I personally just co-exist with them.


Yeah, but you tend to co-exist with a lot...   ;)  ;D  :P
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on March 11, 2015, 05:20:47 PM
I personally just co-exist with them.

Yeah, but you tend to co-exist with a lot...   ;)  ;D  :P

You are right......I do tend to co-exist with way more than I probably should or that's good for me.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FrankDrebinOfFruits on March 11, 2015, 05:29:18 PM
For westerners......

[url]http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74168.html[/url] ([url]http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74168.html[/url])

I personally just co-exist with them.


I am pretty sure we have these out here. I went to pick one up the other day to get rid of him and he bit me. Hurt like nine inch nails.....probably slightly more than a bee sting.  The area bitten became swollen and was red (continued to hurt for about an hour even with ice applied). No stinger left in my hand. They aren't out to attack, but apparently they have a defense mechanism. Anyone else want to test my theory?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: spaceoak on March 23, 2015, 05:11:26 PM
Anybody know what the bettle pictured below is.  Is it ok?  Is it bad for the flowers?  I found three so far.  Only on the flowers of LZ mango. 


(http://s23.postimg.cc/ra39y493r/IMG_1059.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/ra39y493r/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on March 23, 2015, 06:04:06 PM
Anybody know what the bettle pictured below is.  Is it ok?  Is it bad for the flowers?  I found three so far.  Only on the flowers of LZ mango. 


([url]http://s23.postimg.cc/ra39y493r/IMG_1059.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/ra39y493r/[/url])


Mango flower beetle. They eat the flowers.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropicalgrower89 on March 23, 2015, 06:33:23 PM
Anybody know what the bettle pictured below is.  Is it ok?  Is it bad for the flowers?  I found three so far.  Only on the flowers of LZ mango. 


([url]http://s23.postimg.cc/ra39y493r/IMG_1059.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/ra39y493r/[/url])


Mango flower beetle. They eat the flowers.


In other words, kill it.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: spaceoak on March 24, 2015, 09:05:33 PM
Thank you! It is done :-)
Title: Sap oozing from mango... fruit?
Post by: Viking Guy on April 03, 2015, 12:46:55 AM
Any idea as to what would cause a big black spot on a mango with oozing sticky sap?

Never seen this on my fruit before.
(http://s13.postimg.cc/malq9ies3/20150402_194143.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/malq9ies3/)
Title: Re: Sap oozing from mango... fruit?
Post by: Don on April 03, 2015, 12:58:33 AM
I think that is anthracnose or something like that.
Title: Re: Sap oozing from mango... fruit?
Post by: MangoFang on April 03, 2015, 04:28:05 AM
....or....I've had mangoes exposed to a hot sun that developed those
black spots as well.....


Gary
Title: Re: Sap oozing from mango... fruit?
Post by: HMHausman on April 03, 2015, 08:27:10 AM
Any idea as to what would cause a big black spot on a mango with oozing sticky sap?

Never seen this on my fruit before.
([url]http://s13.postimg.cc/malq9ies3/20150402_194143.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/malq9ies3/[/url])


The "go to" disease for anything on mangoes that is black is anthracnose.  I am sure there are other fungal pathogens in the world that might cause such symptoms. The problem largely goes unnoticed once a tree gets some size and there are hundreds of fruits developing.  If your tree is small, even a fruit or two looking like this can be disconcerting. Most fungicides will deal with this and prevent further occurrence and spread.  You have to balance the chemical use and your tolerance for chemical use against the value of getting perfect looking fruit There are some trees, like Rosigold in my collection, that will have virtually every fruit blacken and drop without spraying.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Viking Guy on April 03, 2015, 12:21:00 PM
So far, it is the only fruit in the orchard with the spot.  The tree itself looks fine, and none of the other fruits have spots.

Should I just cut the mango off and dispose of it? 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on April 03, 2015, 12:53:58 PM
So far, it is the only fruit in the orchard with the spot.  The tree itself looks fine, and none of the other fruits have spots.

Should I just cut the mango off and dispose of it?

Probably not necessary but it would be the ultimate in prudence to remove it and discard it.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Viking Guy on April 03, 2015, 03:52:25 PM
So far, it is the only fruit in the orchard with the spot.  The tree itself looks fine, and none of the other fruits have spots.

Should I just cut the mango off and dispose of it?

Probably not necessary but it would be the ultimate in prudence to remove it and discard it.

Always hate wasting a Nam Doc Mai, lol, but don't want the other fruits to get attacked by "The Fruiting Dead."
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangorific on April 27, 2015, 01:25:36 PM
Giant Leaf on Potted Mango Tree

Greetings. I have a 3gal Pram Kai Mea that I would like to take budwood from. However, the tree has grown two giant leaves among what I would categorize as normal sized leaves. Is the abnormality anything to be concerned about? My concern is mainly preventing introduction of disease to the tree targeted for the graft. Pics of the PKM below. Thanks!

(http://s15.postimg.cc/iqi0d5713/20150427_124052.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/iqi0d5713/)

(http://s23.postimg.cc/exsanowvb/20150427_124136.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/exsanowvb/)

(http://s12.postimg.cc/wbx760to9/20150427_124243.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/wbx760to9/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: HMHausman on April 27, 2015, 03:38:08 PM
Giant Leaf on Potted Mango Tree

Greetings. I have a 3gal Pram Kai Mea that I would like to take budwood from. However, the tree has grown two giant leaves among what I would categorize as normal sized leaves. Is the abnormality anything to be concerned about? My concern is mainly preventing introduction of disease to the tree targeted for the graft. Pics of the PKM below. Thanks!

([url]http://s15.postimg.cc/iqi0d5713/20150427_124052.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/iqi0d5713/[/url])

([url]http://s23.postimg.cc/exsanowvb/20150427_124136.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/exsanowvb/[/url])

([url]http://s12.postimg.cc/wbx760to9/20150427_124243.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/wbx760to9/[/url])


A couple of questions.  First, I am assuming that the larger leaves producing stem is above the graft line.  Its hard to see, but if it is the root stock producing the leaves that could be one explanation.  Secondly, was the tree exposed to the same lighting conditions throughout?  Sometimes leaves that have had filtered light grow larger to gather light that is less intense than otherwise experienced generally. Perhaps part of the tree was grown under some shading as in under some shade cloth? If it isn't one of these two things then I have no idea.  I have never seen such a thing happen.  That being said, I wouldn't be concerned about larger leaves.  As far as I am concerned, until proven otherwise, this would be something to marvel at rather than to fret about.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangorific on April 27, 2015, 10:16:32 PM

A couple of questions.  First, I am assuming that the larger leaves producing stem is above the graft line.  Its hard to see, but if it is the root stock producing the leaves that could be one explanation.  Secondly, was the tree exposed to the same lighting conditions throughout?  Sometimes leaves that have had filtered light grow larger to gather light that is less intense than otherwise experienced generally. Perhaps part of the tree was grown under some shading as in under some shade cloth? If it isn't one of these two things then I have no idea.  I have never seen such a thing happen.  That being said, I wouldn't be concerned about larger leaves.  As far as I am concerned, until proven otherwise, this would be something to marvel at rather than to fret about.

Thanks Harry. Perhaps one day the tree will give me giant mutant sized mangos :)

To answer your questions though - The leaves are above the root stock and the giant leaves developed in full sun. Strange eh? Thanks again for your feedback.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on May 08, 2015, 05:25:38 PM
I noticed today that some of the new growth on my Cogshall is showing signs of minors and/or iron deficiency.  I've seen this before and I've given the tree a foliar spray of Southern Ag Citrus Nutritional Spray mixed with their Liguid Iron.  Has always worked well.  But with the tree holding fruit I'm wondering if I should hold off until after harvest, probably sometime in July. 
Any thoughts on this?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on May 08, 2015, 09:13:03 PM
It could green up on its own by July. Hotter temps are more conducive to absorption of micronutes. My carrie used to do that every year until I gave so much mulch that it was able to get enough iron from the compost.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: RichardN on May 16, 2015, 12:39:20 AM
Giant Leaf on Potted Mango Tree

Greetings. I have a 3gal Pram Kai Mea that I would like to take budwood from. However, the tree has grown two giant leaves among what I would categorize as normal sized leaves. Is the abnormality anything to be concerned about? My concern is mainly preventing introduction of disease to the tree targeted for the graft. Pics of the PKM below. Thanks!

([url]http://s15.postimg.cc/iqi0d5713/20150427_124052.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/iqi0d5713/[/url])

([url]http://s23.postimg.cc/exsanowvb/20150427_124136.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/exsanowvb/[/url])

([url]http://s12.postimg.cc/wbx760to9/20150427_124243.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/wbx760to9/[/url])

I have NDM that produced abnormal large size leaves. I recalled applying fertilizer when the buds where swelling up. By this the nitrogen push the young buds into large abnormal sizes.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on May 17, 2015, 08:29:39 PM
Posting these pics for a new friend who is not a forum member. He has had this kent for 3 years, says this has been happening to his tree since pruning last year.  Any thoughts?


(http://s15.postimg.cc/l6nyr6c4n/20150517_193350_1.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/l6nyr6c4n/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 18, 2015, 12:04:09 AM
??? More pictures and info, please.  Perhaps several things are happening at once.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: phoenixtropicals on May 18, 2015, 01:09:36 AM
Looks kind of silky.  Spider eggs maybe.  Maybe it could be good bug for your garden.  I don't use any insecticide in my garden and have never had any real issues.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on May 18, 2015, 09:23:06 AM
??? More pictures and info, please.  Perhaps several things are happening at once.


Here is another pic, let me know what kind of info would be helpful.  He seems to be doing the right things, fertilizing every 4-6 week or so.  Copper spraying when needed which he said not very often this year cuz bloom was poor and no signs of anth. or PM.  Beautiful lush pickering is about 10 yds away with no issues. Here is one more pic I got yesterday of a few other leaves. It has a mix of these weird leaves and regular leaves. Tree is 3 years old grafted.  Full sun, has been in ground for almost 3 years. Prunes in late summer early fall after pickering finishes fruiting as his time guideline. No pesticides used only neem oil if needed.

(http://s11.postimg.cc/ei0y6k8n3/20150517_193354_1.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/ei0y6k8n3/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: From the sea on May 18, 2015, 10:15:38 AM
may be fert burn
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on May 18, 2015, 07:10:55 PM
Per what Har taught me, I'd say powdery mildew.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Pancrazio on May 18, 2015, 08:58:24 PM
I guess i have white flies on my mangoes.

(http://i.imgur.com/IbhBu72.jpg?1)

What i should do? I don't know any active chemical compound to fight these while saving the edibility of fruits. I have been suggested with Flonicamid, but I'm unsure. Does anyone have any tip?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 19, 2015, 09:58:30 AM
Last picture looks like Spider-Mites, not whitefly.

Previous picture looks like Powdery Mildew: dry weather, but with high air humidity during pleasantly cool nights, is ideal for PM.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Pancrazio on May 19, 2015, 08:31:21 PM
Thank you Har. Things must be pretty bad for my mango, because I feel on the leaves the classical sticky you get from aphids. But if they are spider mites i think that the summer and the rain will take care of them.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 19, 2015, 10:58:23 PM
Pesticidal use of plain water, applied forcefully to the underside of the leaves, will work immediately.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on July 02, 2015, 09:22:10 PM
I realized that there is another mango disease.... It's called "mango hoarding."  I have 28 mango tree varieties in-ground; my orchard seems to have the mango hoarding disease.   ;)  Is there any known treatment for this disease? Or am I doomed to plant more and more mango trees?

Of course I mention this with the 23rd Annual International Mango Festival at Fairchild is a little over a week away... 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on July 02, 2015, 10:24:31 PM
I realized that there is another mango disease.... It's called "mango hoarding."  I have 28 mango tree varieties in-ground; my orchard seems to have the mango hoarding disease.   ;)  Is there any known treatment for this disease? Or am I doomed to plant more and more mango trees?

Of course I mention this with the 23rd Annual International Mango Festival at Fairchild is a little over a week away...

The only treatment is to buy more.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Broman on July 16, 2015, 01:36:16 PM
Hello friends, I found this strange knot on my Valencia Pride. Any ideas of what it could be?
(http://s21.postimg.cc/x0um5pib7/image.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/x0um5pib7/)

(http://s21.postimg.cc/duhf2j1tf/image.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/duhf2j1tf/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on July 16, 2015, 08:04:50 PM
I don't know what that is.

I'd cut that branch off about an inch below that wound, leaving those two leaves and buds.
Check for discoloration in the wood, which should be white/cream-colored.  If there is discoloration, sanitize your clippers (with alcohol or chlorox)and cut off another inch or two of that branch, and look again.  Then sanitize your clippers--- before cutting anywhere else.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Clay on July 17, 2015, 12:45:35 AM
My Tequila Sunrise mango tree has been in the ground for about five weeks now. It has one new branch with new leaves just above the graft, and at the very top, it has a bunch of white tips (buds?) that look like they are getting ready to shoot out new leaves or branches.   In the last two days, it has started developing brown spots on the very top leaves (see photos). The lower leaves still look healthy and green. Got any clue why the top leaves would be turning brown?  Should I worry?

(http://glennhome.net/media/Brown_Spots1.jpg)

(http://glennhome.net/media/Healthy_Leaves.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on July 17, 2015, 08:16:17 AM
My Tequila Sunrise mango tree has been in the ground for about five weeks now. It has one new branch with new leaves just above the graft, and at the very top, it has a bunch of white tips (buds?) that look like they are getting ready to shoot out new leaves or branches.   In the last two days, it has started developing brown spots on the very top leaves (see photos). The lower leaves still look healthy and green. Got any clue why the top leaves would be turning brown?  Should I worry?

([url]http://glennhome.net/media/Brown_Spots1.jpg[/url])

([url]http://glennhome.net/media/Healthy_Leaves.jpg[/url])


Leaf scorch and probably initial leaf necrosis.  What's causing it is a guess as I don't have any information about your culture, what conditions, food, pest control the plant has been receiving.  Have you been hitting it hard with fertilizer?  Sun burn?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Clay on July 17, 2015, 10:57:58 AM
Leaf scorch and probably initial leaf necrosis.  What's causing it is a guess as I don't have any information about your culture, what conditions, food, pest control the plant has been receiving.  Have you been hitting it hard with fertilizer?  Sun burn?

This has just happened in the last few days. It has been nice and sunny here this week. If this would have happened right after planting the tree in the ground, I would suspect sunburn/leaf scorch. But it has been in the ground over a month now, the rest of the plant looks healthy, and it is starting to shoot out its first new growth, so I am baffled.

I originally dug the hole 2+ feet deep, and loosened the soil below with an auger for another two feet. When I refilled the hole, I added a bit of Avocado @ Citrus Organic Fertilizer and some organic compost. The tree gets deep watering once a week. I have not added any other amendments or sprays.  No signs of insects or disease so far. Mostly I've just left it alone and it has been looking good, until this.

Any other thoughts?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on July 17, 2015, 02:16:23 PM
Uh oh....

When I refilled the hole, I added a bit of Avocado @ Citrus Organic Fertilizer and some organic compost. The tree gets deep watering once a week.


If your native soil is heavy, clay like and drains poorly, you just done rotted out your root system.  By amending tight soils you construct a pot in the ground which does not drain, nor will the roots ever penetrate and become established in the native soil. 
http://puyallup.wsu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/403/2015/03/soil-amendments.pdf (http://puyallup.wsu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/403/2015/03/soil-amendments.pdf)

The compost goes ON, not in the soil.

Mark
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on July 17, 2015, 02:51:59 PM
To add to Maek's post above, do not add fertilizer in the hole as that will burn the roots and be a contributing factor to your tree's damage.  Always add granular fertilizer to the top of tye soil, liquid fertilizer  can be sprayed and/or drenched.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on July 17, 2015, 03:05:28 PM
I have planted probably 10,000 trees and other stuff on my property in the last 10 years including grapevines.  Every single one got a 12 mo. slow release Polyon 19-4-9 with micros.  I just throw a handful at the base of the seedling after it's been planted and move on. Growth and health is incredible. Never put fertilizer in the hole.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on July 17, 2015, 03:35:10 PM
I have planted probably 10,000 trees and other stuff on my property in the last 10 years including grapevines.  Every single one got a 12 mo. slow release Polyon 19-4-9 with micros.  I just throw a handful at the base of the seedling after it's been planted and move on. Growth and health is incredible. Never put fertilizer in the hole.

That is kind of high on the nitrogen for a mango.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Clay on July 18, 2015, 01:41:28 AM
Wow, thanks for the great feedback! So, is there no way to improve the clay soils which lie under my topsoil? And considering the new growth on the tree and overall good health of the rest of the tree, are the brown spots on these top leaves just the beginning of something bad? Or is it just sunburn that the tree will recover from?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on July 18, 2015, 05:41:52 AM
Amend clay with sand and charcoal/ bio-char.

Some added Manganese may help the current situation.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on July 18, 2015, 08:37:47 AM
Amend clay with sand and charcoal/ bio-char.

Some added Manganese may help the current situation.

Won't help at all unless you go 80% sand, 20% clay.  You really should read the link I posted and get the principles of soil structure.

Think of it this way - add a handful of marbles to a big jar of wheat flour. What do you have?  That's right, a big jar of wheat flour.  You have not changed anything, must less the surrounding native soil.

AGAIN, amend from the top down.  NEVER amend backfill in a native clay soil.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on July 18, 2015, 08:40:31 AM
I have planted probably 10,000 trees and other stuff on my property in the last 10 years including grapevines.  Every single one got a 12 mo. slow release Polyon 19-4-9 with micros.  I just throw a handful at the base of the seedling after it's been planted and move on. Growth and health is incredible. Never put fertilizer in the hole.

That is kind of high on the nitrogen for a mango.

Yes it is, but it worked and got me where I wanted to go to initially push foliage.  I got Pickering and Mallika from PIN a couple of years ago and used that high N food. They are both loaded with fruit this year for the first time.  Last year I let the Pickering hold one fruit, topped the Mallika down to 8" tall to increase branching....induce a nice compact profile.

Against the grain of The Herd, I now lightly fertilize with a Peters Classic 20-3-19 with micros sometimes bumping up the K with K2SO4. There has been no fruit drop.  Glad my plants can't read.   ;D
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on July 18, 2015, 08:50:01 AM
Wow, thanks for the great feedback! So, is there no way to improve the clay soils which lie under my topsoil? And considering the new growth on the tree and overall good health of the rest of the tree, are the brown spots on these top leaves just the beginning of something bad? Or is it just sunburn that the tree will recover from?

Don't know for sure until I observe how you planted and then go from there. Let's put it this way.  My cousin recently lost a peach tree he planted last year in his heavy clay.  With the recent heavy spring rains here in Texas, the "pot" he created held water and the root system rotted.  I knew what the answer was gonna be but baited him anyway with a question, "did you amend the backfill with compost?"   His reply, "of course, that's what the label said to do!"  As he blamed the label not owning up to what he did wrong....I said, "cuz, ya done screwed up."  Gave him Dr. Chalker's explanation....he was dumbfounded.  :D
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on July 19, 2015, 12:22:02 PM
About half of my Sweet Tart mangos have developed splits along the top.  Could this be caused by a nutritional deficiency?

(http://s30.postimg.cc/49rua8jy5/Sweet_Tart_Mango_split.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/49rua8jy5/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on July 19, 2015, 09:39:31 PM
Sweet Tart can tend to have some shoulder splitting issues under certain conditions,   How wet has the area around the treebeen?  Does the tree h ave good air flow?  I do see thst the ffruit looks reallg dirty.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: jetset516 on July 21, 2015, 01:49:27 PM
I hope it's ok to double post, I posted a few days ago but looks like I'll have a better chance at an answer here...

So my mango tree has several dead branches, I decided to pull/hack some off an this is what I found...Nasty suckers...took the adult one half an hour swimming in a pail of chlorine to finally die!
I live in southern Florida, Hollywood to be exact. This tree, I've been told is a "mini" mango tree. Hasn't bore fruit in years, but back when it did they did tend to be much smaller than the normal kind.

Anyways thanks for any and all info!

(http://s11.postimg.cc/r2fb4yhn3/DSCF3911.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/r2fb4yhn3/)

Here's the tree. Lots of dead trunk there, hopefully I an salvage the tree...



(http://s17.postimg.cc/xr41k8hbf/DSCF3913.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/xr41k8hbf/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mr. Clean on July 23, 2015, 08:50:58 PM
Sweet Tart can tend to have some shoulder splitting issues under certain conditions,   How wet has the area around the treebeen?  Does the tree h ave good air flow?  I do see thst the ffruit looks reallg dirty.

It gets daily micro-irrigation.  I have sugar sand, so the water drains quickly.  I am about 10 miles from the coast; it gets very hot and humid here, which creates "dirty" mangoes.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: sobars_machado on August 03, 2015, 05:59:15 PM
Hello,

I have planted 13 grafted mango seedlings of different varieties at the end of April this year; they are growing well. Since the end of June, monsoon/rain started and it is raining almost everyday. Recently the new leaves of some of them have developed those black spots. The new terminal buds of those same plants have also turned black and died. Does anybody know what kind of disease it is and what kind of treatment is recommended to save the plants from this?

Below are the photos showing those spots on 2 different plants.

Thank you very much in advance for your guidance.

Sobars

Mumbai, India

(http://s29.postimg.cc/lmv1016g3/IMG_20150802_WA0011.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/lmv1016g3/)

(http://s29.postimg.cc/wxt3annxf/IMG_20150802_WA0012.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/wxt3annxf/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: strkpr00 on August 03, 2015, 07:42:14 PM
I hope it's ok to double post, I posted a few days ago but looks like I'll have a better chance at an answer here...

So my mango tree has several dead branches, I decided to pull/hack some off an this is what I found...Nasty suckers...took the adult one half an hour swimming in a pail of chlorine to finally die!
I live in southern Florida, Hollywood to be exact. This tree, I've been told is a "mini" mango tree. Hasn't bore fruit in years, but back when it did they did tend to be much smaller than the normal kind.

Anyways thanks for any and all info!

([url]http://s11.postimg.cc/r2fb4yhn3/DSCF3911.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/r2fb4yhn3/[/url])

Here's the tree. Lots of dead trunk there, hopefully I an salvage the tree...



([url]http://s17.postimg.cc/xr41k8hbf/DSCF3913.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/xr41k8hbf/[/url])


If I really liked the mangoes I would aggressively prune till I got clean wood/branches, dispose of all debris, and maybe treat with Bayers Tree Shrub,  Protect & Feed. next years fruit might be safe to eat.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on August 03, 2015, 07:48:00 PM
Hello,

I have planted 13 grafted mango seedlings of different varieties at the end of April this year; they are growing well. Since the end of June, monsoon/rain started and it is raining almost everyday. Recently the new leaves of some of them have developed those black spots. The new terminal buds of those same plants have also turned black and died. Does anybody know what kind of disease it is and what kind of treatment is recommended to save the plants from this?

Below are the photos showing those spots on 2 different plants.

Thank you very much in advance for your guidance.

Sobars

Mumbai, India

([url]http://s29.postimg.cc/lmv1016g3/IMG_20150802_WA0011.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/lmv1016g3/[/url])

([url]http://s29.postimg.cc/wxt3annxf/IMG_20150802_WA0012.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/wxt3annxf/[/url])


I responded to you in your original post.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on August 03, 2015, 07:57:46 PM
I hope it's ok to double post, I posted a few days ago but looks like I'll have a better chance at an answer here...

So my mango tree has several dead branches, I decided to pull/hack some off an this is what I found...Nasty suckers...took the adult one half an hour swimming in a pail of chlorine to finally die!
I live in southern Florida, Hollywood to be exact. This tree, I've been told is a "mini" mango tree. Hasn't bore fruit in years, but back when it did they did tend to be much smaller than the normal kind.

Anyways thanks for any and all info!

([url]http://s11.postimg.cc/r2fb4yhn3/DSCF3911.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/r2fb4yhn3/[/url])

Here's the tree. Lots of dead trunk there, hopefully I an salvage the tree...



([url]http://s17.postimg.cc/xr41k8hbf/DSCF3913.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/xr41k8hbf/[/url])


If I really liked the mangoes I would aggressively prune till I got clean wood/branches, dispose of all debris, and maybe treat with Bayers Tree Shrub,  Protect & Feed. next years fruit might be safe to eat.


I am not sure what Bayer product you are referring to,  Bayer Avanced in the red bottle?  If so, no need to use.tbis product.   If you are going to use Bayer Advanced,  use the one in the blue bottle, its for fruits and veggies.  You could also get a commercial grade imidacloprod if that is needed.

Where were those beetles?

I would cut the tree back pretty severely and fertilize.  Your initial concern should be good growth and return the tree to health.  Of bigger concern is to see what the interior wood looks like when you cut it back.

If it is that bad, you should determine if the efforts are wortb trying to save and turn the tree around.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 03, 2015, 10:04:36 PM
Sobars,

Your mangos appear to have a bacterial leaf spot--- which thrives in extremely wet conditions where also soil splashes up.

You can spray with copper and other products labeled to kill bacteria on plants. 

A clear plastic roof to keep rain off the small plants, and pruning off the affected leaves and tip, would be a non-chemical approach,
probably more effective than frequent spraying.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on August 03, 2015, 10:09:36 PM
Sobars,

Your mangos appear to have a bacterial leaf spot--- which thrives in extremely wet conditions where also soil splashes up.

You can spray with copper and other products labeled to kill bacteria on plants. 

A clear plastic roof to keep rain off the small plants, and pruning off the affected leaves and tip, would be a non-chemical approach,
probably more effective than frequent spraying.


I had already posted that in his other post.  To add, it can be highly contagious and easily spread.

http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=17079.0 (http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=17079.0)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: BrettBorders on August 04, 2015, 09:47:03 AM
My Maha Chanok has been infested with black powder on interior leaves and branches, and also white powdery spots.  I started a year ago, mildly and I ignored it due to being "busy" -  but now it's getting worse. What's the diagnosis and cure?
(http://s12.postimg.cc/51t0bxjqh/IMG_20150803_081717.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/51t0bxjqh/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on August 04, 2015, 12:22:44 PM
I see some scale.  It is from pests on it and/or surrounding trees.  I would spray with Sevin, with a teaspoon of liquid dish soap added, being sure to spray top and undersides of all leaves.  The sooty mold is from the pests.  Once you cintrol or erradicate the pest, the sooty mold will stop.  You can wipe the sooty mold off the leaves or leave it be.  The new growth should come out clean and blooms will be unaffected.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on August 04, 2015, 01:43:11 PM
Does look like scale damage with the soot and all. And probably has attracted ants too.  I've had great luck with dormant oil and malathion best applied in the soft stage but will kill the armored types by smothering them.

good read
http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7408.html (http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7408.html)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: BrettBorders on August 04, 2015, 01:59:43 PM
Does look like scale damage with the soot and all. And probably has attracted ants too.  I've had great luck with dormant oil and malathion best applied in the soft stage but will kill the armored types by smothering them.

good read
[url]http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7408.html[/url] ([url]http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7408.html[/url])


Thanks!

I don't see too many pests on the tree besides ants. sure there are a few leaf notches and flying things, but no major plague I've witnessed.  There is an ant colony living in the rootball. Do I need to kill off the ants?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on August 04, 2015, 02:09:34 PM
Does look like scale damage with the soot and all. And probably has attracted ants too.  I've had great luck with dormant oil and malathion best applied in the soft stage but will kill the armored types by smothering them.

good read
[url]http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7408.html[/url] ([url]http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7408.html[/url])


Thanks!

I don't see too many pests on the tree besides ants. sure there are a few leaf notches and flying things, but no major plague I've witnessed.  There is an ant colony living in the rootball. Do I need to kill off the ants?


Brett - you are missing the point.  The sooty mold does not just appear for the hell of it. 

"Sooty mold is the common name applied to several species of fungi that grow on honeydew secretions on plant parts and other surfaces. The fungi’s dark, threadlike growth (mycelium) gives plants or other substrates the appearance of being covered with a layer of soot.

Sooty molds don’t infect plants but grow on surfaces where honeydew deposits accumulate. Honeydew is a sweet, sticky liquid that plant-sucking insects excrete as they ingest large quantities of sap from a plant. Because the insect can’t completely utilize all the nutrients in this large volume of fluid, it assimilates what it needs and excretes the rest as “honeydew.” Wherever honeydew lands—e.g., leaves, twigs, fruit, yard furniture, concrete, sidewalks, or statuary—sooty molds can become established."

So, there are "pests" either on the Maha or surrounding tree(s).  If there are ants in the tree, they are most likely farming what is there (scale, aphids, mealy bugs, etc.).  I would personally stay away from malathion.  Neem does not work well here in SFla plus at this time of year, to treat with an oil, you would need to use a product that is non-photosensitive and even so, do not spray in daytime sun or during high temperatures.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on August 04, 2015, 04:24:30 PM
Ron, why would  you stay from malathion?  It's much more effective than Sevin plus has a side benefit of being less toxic, is broken down faster by the elements.  Neem is worthless compared to Malathion.

Soot is a side product of scale and if you don't get a handle on it it really screws up photosynthesis.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on August 04, 2015, 04:37:44 PM
Ron, why would  you stay from malathion?  It's much more effective than Sevin plus has a side benefit of being less toxic, is broken down faster by the elements.  Neem is worthless compared to Malathion.

Soot is a side product of scale and if you don't get a handle on it it really screws up photosynthesis.

Malathion has been shyed away from for years here.  I am not saying its not or cannot be effective.

I agree 100%, neem is useless.  Sooty mold is a byproduct of more than just scale.  It can be the result from any sucking insect.  I also agree that isolated sooty mold is not a great harm, widespread sooty mold can cause a domino effect of issues.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: BrettBorders on August 04, 2015, 06:14:23 PM
Yes the is orange, waxy "scale" under the Maha leaves sometimes. I have tried spraying it off with a water hose and wiping the sooty mold off with a wet sponge but it just comes back. Now the tree is getting too large I will try treating it with a pesticide.

I'm pretty sure the ant colony in the rootball is responsible for a lot of SAP sucking. They go after new shoots. Any safe, non systemic way to kill the ant colony that comes with most nursery trees?

If I want to go the Sevin + dishsoap route...how often to spray the whole plant leaves top and bottim.?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: sobars_machado on August 05, 2015, 07:14:41 AM
Hi Brett,

As for killing the ants, there is one easy and effective solution: mix 5 part sugar + 1 part boric powder + enough water to make it like a paste. put some of it around the area where the ants will get attracted; let them eat and within a week that ant colony will be gone. Just let them eat that sugar thing, don't disturb them, so they can eat and also carry it to their nest in order for the queen to eat as well.

If those ants are sweet loving then the above will work, but if they are protin loving then you will need to mix the boric powder in some other food, for example peanut butter.

Good luck.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: savemejebus on August 18, 2015, 05:06:23 PM
Any ideas if this is disease or insect related? All over the leaves of our Kent tree - fruit were awful this year but tree still looks otherwise healthy.


(http://s27.postimg.cc/mt1tutycf/IMAG0253.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/mt1tutycf/)

(http://s27.postimg.cc/weveb4pi7/IMAG0255.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/weveb4pi7/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 19, 2015, 10:01:40 PM
Although it may be a fungal infection, the pattern looks like a deficiency of Potassium.  I have seen this speckled-pattern Potassium deficiency on several unrelated species.  As deficiency of Potassium usually causes burns of leaf tips and edges, I'm not sure why there sometimes is speckling instead.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: rliou on August 25, 2015, 12:23:38 PM
My peach cobbler is filled with ants and the leaves and stems have these brown elevated raised circular thing.  It looks like they might be farming or collecting it.  Is it just sap leakage or is this something i need to worry about?
(http://s9.postimg.cc/to38hgu8b/image.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/to38hgu8b/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Dangermouse01 on August 25, 2015, 04:18:36 PM
My peach cobbler is filled with ants and the leaves and stems have these brown elevated raised circular thing.  It looks like they might be farming or collecting it.  Is it just sap leakage or is this something i need to worry about?
([url]http://s9.postimg.cc/to38hgu8b/image.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/to38hgu8b/[/url])


You've got scale.

DM
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on August 25, 2015, 07:38:34 PM
Do you live adjacent to a freshwater canal? That looks similar to "canal disease," a phrase that I just invented to describe the the myriad issues that plague mango trees along a canal, including fungal diseases (presumably caused by the increased humidity) and lack of nutrition caused by the junk (aka limestone) that they piled up under the soil along the canal.


Any ideas if this is disease or insect related? All over the leaves of our Kent tree - fruit were awful this year but tree still looks otherwise healthy.


([url]http://s27.postimg.cc/mt1tutycf/IMAG0253.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/mt1tutycf/[/url])

([url]http://s27.postimg.cc/weveb4pi7/IMAG0255.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/weveb4pi7/[/url])
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: nakulv1 on October 10, 2015, 08:13:01 AM
Is this mango malformation disease?

https://goo.gl/photos/1pcfCaqdxWE27wYt8 (https://goo.gl/photos/1pcfCaqdxWE27wYt8)

https://goo.gl/photos/DiVe2RcSQHtRwi9FA (https://goo.gl/photos/DiVe2RcSQHtRwi9FA)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: nakulv1 on October 10, 2015, 04:49:39 PM
Is this mango malformation disease? I wasn't aware of this disease back when I purchased the plant from the nursery.
(http://s28.postimg.cc/4e9phngax/P_20151010_170436.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/4e9phngax/)

(http://s23.postimg.cc/7hxb0yslz/P_20151010_170430.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/7hxb0yslz/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: raimeiken on October 10, 2015, 05:32:56 PM
Is sap oozing from the trunk and branches normal? or is it a sign of a disease or over watering?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on October 11, 2015, 10:25:25 AM
Is sap oozing from the trunk and branches normal? or is it a sign of a disease or over watering?

Please post pictures.  We would have to see what you are referring to before providing any type of diagnosis.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: raimeiken on October 11, 2015, 06:21:05 PM
Sorry for the lack of pictures. Here's two of my trees showing a little bit of sap oozing out of the main trunk. This started in the middle of summer. The trees are growing fine. Flushing new leaves right now too.

(http://i.imgur.com/gk9imV2.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/QneYeJA.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on October 11, 2015, 07:57:43 PM
What varieties are they?

From exterior sight, looks similar to gummosis.  There are some other diseases that can cause this.  Do any of the limbs have any die back?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: raimeiken on October 11, 2015, 09:26:42 PM
one is Lemon zest and the other is coconut cream. No die back from both trees yet. How can it be treated?

Will spraying copper fungicide on the oozing area be enough?  Or should i spray the entire tree?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 11, 2015, 11:15:16 PM
It does look kind of serious--- probably a bacterial infection..  I suggest trying Copper spray on the bark(wear eye protection), alternated with Potassium Phosphite (such as Foliar Phosphite, K-Phite, Plant Doctor), each once a month, through early Spring.

If the oozing still occurs next Spring or Summer, give up on the friendly stuff, and use one or more conventional systemic fungicides / bactericides, and remove all fruit as they appear.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on October 12, 2015, 10:50:39 AM
Last year, there were a few locations where PPK/Lemon Meringue trees had a bleeding sap issues on more mature trees.  These trees had a good amount of bleeding and some exhibited dieback and massive leaf drop on certain limbs.  On one tree in Broward County, samples were cut and sent to TREC in Miami for analysis (I have pictures of the cut samples should anyone want to see them).  Below you will find the report.

(http://s10.postimg.cc/xrqdbc58l/PPK_disease_Page_1.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/xrqdbc58l/)

They also recommended applications of MycoStim and Exel LG Foliar Fertilizer.

In another location in Palm Beach County, the tree was sprayed with fungicide and fertilized and otherwise let be, it came back and flushed and did not have any further detrimental damage.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on October 12, 2015, 11:14:48 AM
Could this also be the result of an injury at the bleed site, for example, sun burn or delayed response to cold damage?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: raimeiken on October 12, 2015, 06:51:17 PM
Thanks for the responses guys! It helps a lot. I'll try spraying them with some copper fungicide that I have and continue my foliar feeding. I hope they recover from this. After reading that report, it doesn't seem promising since they recommend pruning instead of fungicides. I can't really cut back my trees at those points on where they're bleeding from since those are the main trunk/stems.

Should I scrape the sap off the trunks and then spray with fungicide? Or should i leave the sap on the trees?

I think what caused this is from the stress of high temperatures since we had some pretty hot weeks this past summer. Over 115f days on end.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 12, 2015, 09:42:13 PM
bsbullie, thank you for that report!

I have seen this on one side of a 'Haden' mango in Jupiter.   The stress was provided by a strong strap that was used to right the tree after Hurricane Wilma, and left there until it had almost entirely girdled the main trunk.
Title: Re: Black spot or not?
Post by: Mangofique on October 28, 2015, 07:08:52 AM
dear all,

I recently received pictures of a consignment of mango showing these symptoms. While my initial reaction was bacterial spot, I am wondering if this was more fungal in origin.

does anyone have any ideas?

regards,
Mp.

(http://s29.postimg.cc/6f05r9q03/bs1.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/6f05r9q03/)

(http://s29.postimg.cc/h33wq3zz7/iphone_pictures_090.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/h33wq3zz7/)
Title: Re: Black spot or not?
Post by: bsbullie on October 28, 2015, 07:16:21 AM
dear all,

I recently received pictures of a consignment of mango showing these symptoms. While my initial reaction was bacterial spot, I am wondering if this was more fungal in origin.

does anyone have any ideas?

regards,
Mp.

([url]http://s29.postimg.cc/6f05r9q03/bs1.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/6f05r9q03/[/url])

([url]http://s29.postimg.cc/h33wq3zz7/iphone_pictures_090.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/h33wq3zz7/[/url])


Where were the mangoes grown and what variety?   Is there any damage to the tree/leaves?  It doesn't look like the damage goes that deep i to the fruit.  Bacterial Blac Spot will caise open lesions, oozing from the lesions and the damage will go deep into the flesh. 
Title: Re: Black spot or not?
Post by: Mangofique on October 28, 2015, 07:47:38 AM
hi,

Thank you for the reply.... This is Egyptian Keitt, and sea freighted into Europe.


I am not sure about the field that this was grown in, as we are only seeing the harvested fruit. As this fruit ripens these lesions do tend to create decay further into the flesh.


regards,
MP

dear all,

I recently received pictures of a consignment of mango showing these symptoms. While my initial reaction was bacterial spot, I am wondering if this was more fungal in origin.

does anyone have any ideas?

regards,
Mp.

([url]http://s29.postimg.cc/6f05r9q03/bs1.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/6f05r9q03/[/url])

([url]http://s29.postimg.cc/h33wq3zz7/iphone_pictures_090.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/h33wq3zz7/[/url])


Where were the mangoes grown and what variety?   Is there any damage to the tree/leaves?  It doesn't look like the damage goes that deep i to the fruit.  Bacterial Blac Spot will caise open lesions, oozing from the lesions and the damage will go deep into the flesh.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on October 28, 2015, 07:52:16 AM
With Bacterial Black Spot, the damage occurs while fruit is on the tree.  In another thread, i pisted an excellent publication on Bacterial Black Spot that explains it and has detailed pictures.   I have also seen it first hsnd here in Florida.   It us very contagious,  even after fruit is harvested.  If you do a search you should be able to find my post.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: raimeiken on October 30, 2015, 06:51:11 PM
I might have just figured out the problem with my mango trees. Quite a bit of the new leaves that have been flushing are very deformed, stunted, and just the wrong color. All of that including the oozing sap that I posted above a few weeks ago. So I searched on google and found that Boron deficiency causes this to mango trees and so does gummosis!

Here's a snippet from the source:

https://books.google.com/books?id=oloEhPYqE8QC&pg=PA423&lpg=PA423&dq=boron+deficient+mango&source=bl&ots=no_0smVQ4Z&sig=yhsD_UtMlDYGUwKz1fYtipl2dtY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CGYQ6AEwC2oVChMIh_v81J7ryAIVVuZjCh1O3ARH#v=onepage&q=boron%20deficient%20mango&f=false (https://books.google.com/books?id=oloEhPYqE8QC&pg=PA423&lpg=PA423&dq=boron+deficient+mango&source=bl&ots=no_0smVQ4Z&sig=yhsD_UtMlDYGUwKz1fYtipl2dtY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CGYQ6AEwC2oVChMIh_v81J7ryAIVVuZjCh1O3ARH#v=onepage&q=boron%20deficient%20mango&f=false)

(http://i.imgur.com/uBzgx7K.png)

It's too bad that's all there is available in that preview of that book on the subject, it gets cut off at the bottom there.

So how does one remedy boron deficiency? is there a product you guys use for this?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Brev Grower on October 31, 2015, 03:05:44 AM
So how does one remedy boron deficiency? is there a product you guys use for this

You can sprinkle some borax around the dripline of the tree and then water it in. Be careful though not to use too much because then you will be dealing with B toxicity. Roach killing powders are usually made of Borax. You can find them at a dollar store around here!  8)

E.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on October 31, 2015, 06:23:04 AM
So how does one remedy boron deficiency? is there a product you guys use for this

You can sprinkle some borax around the dripline of the tree and then water it in. Be careful though not to use too much because then you will be dealing with B toxicity. Roach killing powders are usually made of Borax. You can find them at a dollar store around here!  8)

E.

No, do not recommend this.  Using a quality Palm fertilizer and if need be supplement with a liquid minor boost and you should have what you need in terms of boron.  Nutrient deficiency is the problem when using all purpose or fertilizers just not meant for the growing conditions.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: raimeiken on October 31, 2015, 04:00:26 PM
So how does one remedy boron deficiency? is there a product you guys use for this

You can sprinkle some borax around the dripline of the tree and then water it in. Be careful though not to use too much because then you will be dealing with B toxicity. Roach killing powders are usually made of Borax. You can find them at a dollar store around here!  8)

E.

No, do not recommend this.  Using a quality Palm fertilizer and if need be supplement with a liquid minor boost and you should have what you need in terms of boron.  Nutrient deficiency is the problem when using all purpose or fertilizers just not meant for the growing conditions.

yeah I'm not going to mess with Borax. I've been using Espoma's Citrus-tone on my mangoes and also Southern AG's Citrus nutritional spray, which both apparently do not have boron. I found another product by Southern AG that I'll use next time.

It's called 'Essential Minor Elements' in granular form and CONTAINS: Magnesium 8%, Manganese 2%, Iron 5%, Sulfur 8%, Copper .25%, Zinc 0.5%, Boron .03%.

Do you think I should wait until spring to apply it in the soil?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: merce3 on December 31, 2015, 11:21:44 AM
does anyone know what's going on with this lancetilla? the leaf edges are drying and the new leaves are curled and stunted. i want to hit it with a foliar, but want to check here first.

(http://i.imgur.com/W4cebPvl.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/p9qmfVZl.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: oneliahz@aol.com on January 07, 2016, 10:23:41 AM
Good morning everyone my name is onelia, i m loosing the battle with my mango trees, i have a jullie mango and each leave has lots of tiny black dots on it. i have spray with copper almost every week. nothing changes as a new leaves comes out it gets dost right away. please help me
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on January 07, 2016, 11:19:18 AM
Good morning everyone my name is onelia, i m loosing the battle with my mango trees, i have a jullie mango and each leave has lots of tiny black dots on it. i have spray with copper almost every week. nothing changes as a new leaves comes out it gets dost right away. please help me

Reace it with a Juliette if you want the Julie flavor and characteristics.   Julies are known to be problem childs in the State of Florida.   I also would not want to be spraying my tree every week with copper.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Raulglezruiz on January 26, 2016, 10:03:20 AM
Please help this sickness is appearing on my Pineaple Pleasure and Pimsanemun any idea how to get rid of?
(http://s15.postimg.cc/8xlhq43l3/IMG_20160120_181305.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/8xlhq43l3/)

(http://s30.postimg.cc/whbkh3uf1/IMG_20160120_181237.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/whbkh3uf1/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gunnar429 on January 26, 2016, 10:39:58 AM
Please help this sickness is appearing on my Pineaple Pleasure and Pimsanemun any idea how to get rid of?
([url]http://s15.postimg.cc/8xlhq43l3/IMG_20160120_181305.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/8xlhq43l3/[/url])

([url]http://s30.postimg.cc/whbkh3uf1/IMG_20160120_181237.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://postimg.cc/image/whbkh3uf1/[/url])


No, not Pineapple Pleasure!!!  :o :(  That mango rocks.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Jani on January 26, 2016, 03:39:39 PM
Good morning everyone my name is onelia, i m loosing the battle with my mango trees, i have a jullie mango and each leave has lots of tiny black dots on it. i have spray with copper almost every week. nothing changes as a new leaves comes out it gets dost right away. please help me


Reace it with a Juliette if you want the Julie flavor and characteristics.   Julies are known to be problem childs in the State of Florida.   I also would not want to be spraying my tree every week with copper.


I'm getting the exact same issue with my potted Glenn as Onelia, it's been trying to send new growth for several months and they all get this spotting and shrivel and fall.
Anthracnose?

By the way anyone wants to take this Glenn and Mallika  (in the background) off my hands message me. The Mallika is full of scale. .I have a pretty small yard and there are just no sunny spots left, maybe that's why these two are struggling, so they gotta go but I'll rather see if someone wants them before making them mulch.  They're gonna need some TLC...but both have fruited well before especially the Glenn which has produced at least a dozen or so fruits every year for the past 4. Both around 6 ft high and wide, the Glenn's been trimmed back several times.....


(http://s24.postimg.cc/60a8zjmxd/20160126_073743.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/60a8zjmxd/)



(http://s27.postimg.cc/p3frxg4lr/20160126_073754.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/p3frxg4lr/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: merce3 on March 23, 2016, 02:03:50 PM
can anyone help me diagnose this problem? the panicles on my rosigold are all wilted including old and new growth. it flowered while in the ground and was growing healthy and everything wilted overnight. we had 30 mph winds the other night and temperatures in the upper 40s. it also rained before the temperature drop. i really don't know what to do to bring it back to life.

(http://i.imgur.com/y5FA8pLl.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Dangermouse01 on March 23, 2016, 04:30:48 PM
Step around the base and see if moles have tunneled around thru the roots. That is usually what I find when I have a small tree that wilts suddenly but will come back when I water it only to be wilted again the next day.

DM
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: merce3 on March 24, 2016, 09:35:56 AM
Step around the base and see if moles have tunneled around thru the roots. That is usually what I find when I have a small tree that wilts suddenly but will come back when I water it only to be wilted again the next day.

DM

No moles... The ground is still saturated too so I am sure it has enough water.

Any other ideas?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on March 24, 2016, 10:24:40 AM
Step around the base and see if moles have tunneled around thru the roots. That is usually what I find when I have a small tree that wilts suddenly but will come back when I water it only to be wilted again the next day.

DM

No moles... The ground is still saturated too so I am sure it has enough water.

Any other ideas?

How big/old is the tree?  I would like to see more pictures of the tree and the base also.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: merce3 on March 24, 2016, 12:45:23 PM
Step around the base and see if moles have tunneled around thru the roots. That is usually what I find when I have a small tree that wilts suddenly but will come back when I water it only to be wilted again the next day.

DM


No moles... The ground is still saturated too so I am sure it has enough water.

Any other ideas?


How big/old is the tree?  I would like to see more pictures of the tree and the base also.


it's not that old. I bought it in the fall and would guess it's about 1.5-2 years old. it is about 4 feet tall.
(http://i.imgur.com/TBymgHNl.gif)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on March 24, 2016, 01:31:46 PM
Step around the base and see if moles have tunneled around thru the roots. That is usually what I find when I have a small tree that wilts suddenly but will come back when I water it only to be wilted again the next day.

DM


No moles... The ground is still saturated too so I am sure it has enough water.

Any other ideas?


How big/old is the tree?  I would like to see more pictures of the tree and the base also.


it's not that old. I bought it in the fall and would guess it's about 1.5-2 years old. it is about 4 feet tall.
([url]http://i.imgur.com/TBymgHNl.gif[/url])


Without seeing the whole tree, I would say it is a combination of stress from the bloom and lack of water.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: merce3 on March 24, 2016, 05:42:08 PM
Step around the base and see if moles have tunneled around thru the roots. That is usually what I find when I have a small tree that wilts suddenly but will come back when I water it only to be wilted again the next day.

DM


No moles... The ground is still saturated too so I am sure it has enough water.

Any other ideas?


How big/old is the tree?  I would like to see more pictures of the tree and the base also.


it's not that old. I bought it in the fall and would guess it's about 1.5-2 years old. it is about 4 feet tall.
([url]http://i.imgur.com/TBymgHNl.gif[/url])


Without seeing the whole tree, I would say it is a combination of stress from the bloom and lack of water.


sorry... here are some better pictures. i scratched the surface and it's still moist.

(http://i.imgur.com/oBOBzHyl.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/2D0LFgUl.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on March 24, 2016, 06:10:16 PM
Its not the surface that is the issue (which is why just lawn sprinklers are of little help to younger trees).  In general, from the picture,  it looks pretty dry.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on March 24, 2016, 07:39:19 PM
Hard to tell, but the ground looks dry.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: merce3 on March 25, 2016, 08:09:24 AM
It looks dry, but it is still pretty wet. We got a heavy rain last night but it still looks the same... should I clip the droopy particles or do anything else?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: skhan on April 23, 2016, 10:41:21 AM
My Keitt is flushing out and some of the new flushes are looking bad.
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1441/26568748206_bfc2021dd3_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/GtMMcC) (https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1674/25989767974_56752a90cc_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/FACmxQ)
I noticed when troubling the new leaves, a skinny brown beetle with a white spot came out. Around the size of an ant, but longer.

Here are some flushes on the same tree that are fine-ish:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1473/26568746516_46676073cc_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/GtMLGu) (https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1694/25989765324_d0b74daa89_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/FACkL9)

Should i remove the diseased looking flushes?
What to should i do?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 23, 2016, 10:53:15 PM
I think this is spider mite, but hoping the other forum members will chime in. I'm getting a bad infestation of the same thing on a couple of my mango trees.

My Keitt is flushing out and some of the new flushes are looking bad.
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1441/26568748206_bfc2021dd3_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/GtMMcC) (https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1674/25989767974_56752a90cc_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/FACmxQ)
I noticed when troubling the new leaves, a skinny brown beetle with a white spot came out. Around the size of an ant, but longer.

Here are some flushes on the same tree that are fine-ish:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1473/26568746516_46676073cc_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/GtMLGu) (https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1694/25989765324_d0b74daa89_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/FACkL9)

Should i remove the diseased looking flushes?
What to should i do?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 23, 2016, 11:48:01 PM
Here are some pictures of mine. Notice all the little bugs in the 3 picture.

(http://s31.postimg.cc/dkl6kb7kn/DSC09275.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/dkl6kb7kn/)

(http://s31.postimg.cc/t8mdr3n6f/DSC09277.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/t8mdr3n6f/)

(http://s31.postimg.cc/9yfd7o17b/DSC09289.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/9yfd7o17b/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: skhan on April 24, 2016, 12:01:24 AM
Thanks Jeff,
i'll check tomorrow and see if i can see them
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangokothiyan on April 24, 2016, 12:01:55 AM

I have had the same problem on all my mango trees except Venus. I think it is not diseased; it is just the bugs taking a particular liking to the new growth. I used Sevin on one of the trees (Maha Chanok) just as the swollen buds were about to push out and that worked. The  new growth came out good and healthy looking.  I tip-pruned  most of the other trees and I am planning to use Sevin or Organocide just when the branches push new growth.

I think this is spider mite, but hoping the other forum members will chime in. I'm getting a bad infestation of the same thing on a couple of my mango trees.

My Keitt is flushing out and some of the new flushes are looking bad.
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1441/26568748206_bfc2021dd3_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/GtMMcC) (https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1674/25989767974_56752a90cc_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/FACmxQ)
I noticed when troubling the new leaves, a skinny brown beetle with a white spot came out. Around the size of an ant, but longer.

Here are some flushes on the same tree that are fine-ish:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1473/26568746516_46676073cc_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/GtMLGu) (https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1694/25989765324_d0b74daa89_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/FACkL9)

Should i remove the diseased looking flushes?
What to should i do?
h again
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 24, 2016, 12:31:43 AM
I got some close-up shots of the little buggers. I watched with a magnifier, and they stick a needle like thing in the mouth area into the tender foliage and suck the sap. What the heck are they?

(http://s31.postimg.cc/fwmufp02f/DSC09291.jpg) (http://postimg.cc/image/fwmufp02f/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 24, 2016, 01:03:10 AM
OK. Sevin will work, but it will cause some collateral damage. Very toxic to the guys keeping your soil healthy -- earthworms and millipedes. I tried it once years ago and found piles of dead millipedes the next day. I might try a pyrethrin based product.

I have had the same problem on all my mango trees except Venus. I think it is not diseased; it is just the bugs taking a particular liking to the new growth. I used Sevin on one of the trees (Maha Chanok) just as the swollen buds were about to push out and that worked. The  new growth came out good and healthy looking.  I tip-pruned  most of the other trees and I am planning to use Sevin or Organocide just when the branches push new growth.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangokothiyan on April 24, 2016, 10:32:57 AM

Thanks for the information, Jeff. How about Safer insect  killing soap? It is organic. I think spraying the tree just when the new growth is about to push out is key. I have seen new growth completely die because of the bugs. They do not seem to be interested in anything other than really tender foliage.

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 24, 2016, 10:46:01 AM
Never tried it. Oils here tend to burn. Yah, the trick is finding something that won't burn tender foliage. I wish someone could identify this pest so that we could figure out a good control measure.


Thanks for the information, Jeff. How about Safer insect  killing soap? It is organic. I think spraying the tree just when the new growth is about to push out is key. I have seen new growth completely die because of the bugs. They do not seem to be interested in anything other than really tender foliage.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on April 24, 2016, 12:01:27 PM
Safer soap is about useless.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: TnTrobbie on April 24, 2016, 06:19:34 PM
 - - -  -
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 25, 2016, 08:03:47 PM
So, one person believes that the insect damaging the mango leaves is a mirid. I'm starting to wonder if we had an outbreak of avocado mirids which caused both the swiss cheese avocado leaves (and low fruit set) and the ratty looking new mango growth.

Fortunately, the mango damage is mostly cosmetic at this point, because I'll be pruning all of the affected trees back this summer. So, rather than hit it with insecticide, I'm just going to pick off new shoots and prune out the affected foliage. I think the mirid population will dwindle once the hell heat of south florida summer kicks in.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on April 25, 2016, 11:13:37 PM
So, one person believes that the insect damaging the mango leaves is a mirid. I'm starting to wonder if we had an outbreak of avocado mirids which caused both the swiss cheese avocado leaves (and low fruit set) and the ratty looking new mango growth.

Fortunately, the mango damage is mostly cosmetic at this point, because I'll be pruning all of the affected trees back this summer. So, rather than hit it with insecticide, I'm just going to pick off new shoots and prune out the affected foliage. I think the mirid population will dwindle once the hell heat of south florida summer kicks in.

I noticed the two insects in your picture look like different bugs based on their anatomy although it could be angle and clarity.

Have you been able to find any pictures to id the mirid if thsts w h at it is?  Have you had any unusual fruit drop on m a ng and/or avocado?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 25, 2016, 11:51:45 PM
I found some pictures that look very similar to the bugs. But, I haven't had much luck finding info on them in the context of mango. Dr Crane was the one who thought it could be a mirid, but he wasn't sure. I"m still waiting to hear back from a couple of other people.

So, one person believes that the insect damaging the mango leaves is a mirid. I'm starting to wonder if we had an outbreak of avocado mirids which caused both the swiss cheese avocado leaves (and low fruit set) and the ratty looking new mango growth.

Fortunately, the mango damage is mostly cosmetic at this point, because I'll be pruning all of the affected trees back this summer. So, rather than hit it with insecticide, I'm just going to pick off new shoots and prune out the affected foliage. I think the mirid population will dwindle once the hell heat of south florida summer kicks in.

I noticed the two insects in your picture look like different bugs based on their anatomy although it could be angle and clarity.

Have you been able to find any pictures to id the mirid if thsts w h at it is?  Have you had any unusual fruit drop on m a ng and/or avocado?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: skhan on April 26, 2016, 08:47:20 AM
I took a look at the new flushes and i didn't see and bugs around.
I removed it and spot sprayed sevin near the terminals, hopefully the next flush is better.
Seem like with this Keitt ever other flush is messed up.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fisherking73 on April 27, 2016, 05:21:56 PM
So what effect will running sprinklers have on mango production? I am trying to control the amount of water they get as to not to over water when fruiting. The grass has taken a hit the last 2 years, and pretty much scorched earth with beautiful mango trees LOL  Will using sprinkler system to irrigate grass 2-3 time a week screw up anything related to the mangoes?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 27, 2016, 05:56:50 PM
Watering 15 - 20 minutes per zone twice a week is fine and actually helps avoid splitting in the event of sudden rainfall during drought season. Just keep the water from hitting leaves / fruits. And be sure to adjust your watering to the weather. For example, you can almost cut out watering altogether during our "winter."

So what effect will running sprinklers have on mango production? I am trying to control the amount of water they get as to not to over water when fruiting. The grass has taken a hit the last 2 years, and pretty much scorched earth with beautiful mango trees LOL  Will using sprinkler system to irrigate grass 2-3 time a week screw up anything related to the mangoes?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: skhan on May 18, 2016, 11:59:52 AM
Here some pics of my fathers VP tree. Planted from a 3 gallon around 4-5 years ago.
Don't know whats going on with it looks to be deficient in a few things. I think he might of spray some potassium on it a few months to a year ago.

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7288/27012715301_745405aa25_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/Ha2e9H)

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7233/26477331003_560c1ae513_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/GkHf3X)

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7135/27012713851_eb694b5f0a_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/Ha2dHH)

Any ideas??
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: skhan on May 23, 2016, 11:02:03 PM
Bump,
It seems like a nutrient problem to m untrained eyes
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 29, 2016, 11:13:44 AM
Powdery Mildew.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: darkcoolboo on June 27, 2016, 03:48:05 PM
Here's a link from over at the phoenix fruit forum. The owner said that after the winter, the entire tree defoliated, but it wasn't because of the frost. The leaves turned dried green instead of the dried brown leaves characteristic of frost damage. The plant usually restarts from the base of the tree, which is the rootstock. I've also seen it happen before, so what do you think is the problem.


What's wrong with my mango tree ? - http://phoenixtropicals.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?t=667 (http://phoenixtropicals.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?t=667)


(https://s31.postimg.cc/uje8fh76j/13_16.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on June 27, 2016, 10:24:07 PM
Dried green?  As in rapid dehydration in the shade?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: knlim000 on July 12, 2016, 12:12:52 AM
My tree is show sign of the sap oozing out thru the trunk too and it's showing a bit of black color.  I am trying tea leaf oil on it to see if it will kill fungus that form the black color. Anyone try tea leaf oil before? I had a soar on my lip and it was getting bigger too, I applied tea leaf oil to it and it started to heal. I was thinking it might do the same for the tree trunk.

Sorry for the lack of pictures. Here's two of my trees showing a little bit of sap oozing out of the main trunk. This started in the middle of summer. The trees are growing fine. Flushing new leaves right now too.

([url]http://i.imgur.com/gk9imV2.jpg[/url])

([url]http://i.imgur.com/QneYeJA.jpg[/url])
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on July 12, 2016, 08:28:00 AM
We've dealt with this earlier in this thread.

Alternate sprays on whole tree about every two weeks with a phosphite product spray, and a couple weeks later with a copper product spray, until there are no more new indications of continuing problem.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: knlim000 on July 12, 2016, 05:37:17 PM
My question is has anyone tried it with tea tree oil on the open wound  which is oozing out saps and will most likely be susceptible to fungus and later cause trunk disease like canker : https://www.flickr.com/photos/scotnelson/9603887230/in/album-72157632297340636/ (https://www.flickr.com/photos/scotnelson/9603887230/in/album-72157632297340636/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: DurianLover on September 26, 2016, 05:17:51 PM
Can anyone name this disease and prescribed cure for it? Branches have have spots with symptoms like snake shedding skin. It does seems to effect growth of the trees or vigor.

(http://i65.tinypic.com/kbotfn.jpg)

(http://i66.tinypic.com/34shvf4.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on September 26, 2016, 09:41:44 PM
I have never seen that.   I hope it isn't in the USA!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: DurianLover on September 26, 2016, 11:19:00 PM
I have never seen that.   I hope it isn't in the USA!

No, it's not in USA! I made a typo, should have said "does not seem to effect growth of the trees or vigor".  I've seen mature trees with this issue in vicinity, they all seem to be growing and producing fine. Placing all of my mango trees under perpetual quarantine than.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: skhan on December 06, 2016, 08:57:35 AM
My Glenn is dropping a few leaves and is looking a bit sick.
The upper part of the tree is (not in photo) is full and looks healthy
(https://c6.staticflickr.com/6/5476/30651742733_6a480e351e_n.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/NGAcdZ)
(It looks a bit scraggly because i hollowed out the interior for better air flow this year)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 06, 2016, 09:34:45 AM
Drought response and/or nitrogen deficiency.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: skhan on December 06, 2016, 09:48:35 AM
Drought response and/or nitrogen deficiency.
Thanks Har.
If i water it and/or apply nitrogen now would that throw off any reproductive flushes?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on December 06, 2016, 10:47:49 AM
Drought response and/or nitrogen deficiency.
Thanks Har.
If i water it and/or apply nitrogen now would that throw off any reproductive flushes?

You can give it some water now but if its mature enough and you want it to fruit, hold off on any nitrogen till after fruit harvest.  If it is extremely deficient of nitrogen, give fertilizer and sacrifice this season's fruit.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: skhan on December 06, 2016, 10:49:48 AM
Awesome thanks
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on December 06, 2016, 11:16:42 AM
I water my trees (mangoes included) twice a week this time of the year. They appreciate consistent access to water. I just finished building out a sprinkler system for the neighboring lot :-).
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: ibliz on December 07, 2016, 01:52:31 AM
That's caused by the larva of Mango Stem Miner (Spulerina isonoma), which is a moth.
It's a rare and minor pest. I have seen them a few times. A regular spray against the other major pests (flies, borers etc) should also control it.



Can anyone name this disease and prescribed cure for it? Branches have have spots with symptoms like snake shedding skin. It does seems to effect growth of the trees or vigor.

([url]http://i65.tinypic.com/kbotfn.jpg[/url])

([url]http://i66.tinypic.com/34shvf4.jpg[/url])
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 07, 2016, 09:20:09 AM
Thank you for the identification of mango stem miner.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FruitFreak on January 03, 2017, 11:58:24 PM
What is this doo doo on my Pickering?

(https://s29.postimg.cc/ebdmakyz7/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ebdmakyz7/)

(https://s29.postimg.cc/42l54raxf/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/42l54raxf/)

(https://s29.postimg.cc/bxvojkkk3/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bxvojkkk3/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on January 04, 2017, 06:42:56 AM
Looks like a red algae. 

You could probably clean most of it off with a 3/4-inch garden hose and water pistol;  then, after it dries, spray with copper.   

Other things that might work would be horticultural spray oil, or Organocide 3-in-1, followed by Biowash Plant Care sprayed with good pressure.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FruitFreak on January 04, 2017, 02:35:02 PM
Looks like a red algae. 

You could probably clean most of it off with a 3/4-inch garden hose and water pistol;  then, after it dries, spray with copper.   

Other things that might work would be horticultural spray oil, or Organocide 3-in-1, followed by Biowash Plant Care sprayed with good pressure.

Thanks Har.  I will be setting up a call with you in the near future.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on February 05, 2017, 06:38:22 PM
I have a Julie seedling experiment (growing it from seed to see what it produces), and the leaves look like it's affected by Anthracnose.  Could someone confirm and let me know the safest way to treat it?
(https://s30.postimg.cc/ylaxw1eul/20170205_175720.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ylaxw1eul/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/kg54u85t9/20170205_175711.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/kg54u85t9/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/g8aclh4dp/20170205_175701.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/g8aclh4dp/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/o2ay6vc6l/20170205_175653.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/o2ay6vc6l/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/bc6pts48d/20170205_175644.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bc6pts48d/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 06, 2017, 12:03:31 AM
Pictures a little too blurred when magnified....

On-line, look up "Thrips on mangos", look at the pictures, and then look at your mango's leaves with magnification, such as 8X, or a little higher.

Do they match?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on February 12, 2017, 04:51:43 PM
You're right.  I see little bugs on there, but I"m not sure they're thrips.  They have a red stripe across their back and there's also black bugs crawling around too.  They're on all the leaves.

(https://s9.postimg.cc/5tuycg9bf/20170212_161738.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5tuycg9bf/)

(https://s22.postimg.cc/it52rlan1/20170212_161925.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/it52rlan1/)

(https://s13.postimg.cc/3sxm6jk0z/20170212_162007.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3sxm6jk0z/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on February 12, 2017, 05:02:18 PM
Adding more pics of the bugs.  I think they are red banded thrips:


(https://s2.postimg.cc/n9p9700ad/20170212_165449.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/n9p9700ad/)

(https://s2.postimg.cc/o0hzcs2np/20170212_165447.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/o0hzcs2np/)

(https://s2.postimg.cc/r8mgptoxh/20170212_165444.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/r8mgptoxh/)

(https://s2.postimg.cc/6d06eksqd/20170212_165441.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6d06eksqd/)

(https://s2.postimg.cc/gbpqesrjp/20170212_165439.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/gbpqesrjp/)

(https://s2.postimg.cc/7uq83vmut/20170212_165437.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7uq83vmut/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 12, 2017, 09:00:31 PM
Red-banded Thrips nymphs, and dark adults.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on February 13, 2017, 12:48:32 PM
What's the best way to treat it?  Should I remove the worst leaves, and spray the rest with a Spinosad product like this -> http://www.bonide.com/products/garden-naturals/view/252/captain-jacks-deadbug-brew-conc (http://www.bonide.com/products/garden-naturals/view/252/captain-jacks-deadbug-brew-conc)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropheus76 on February 13, 2017, 09:00:16 PM
Wow did we need a colder winter. Finding those flipping grey and orange striped weevils on other trees now besides my mangos. I found them chewing on an all spice tree. Threw a handful in the canal, fish love them. Guess Ill have to hit those trees with a root drench too. Oddly enough they ignored my graham and pickering which are blooming and have fruit and are in the middle between the infested trees.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on February 13, 2017, 09:37:15 PM
They are definitely a nuisance. They tend to prefer certain cultivars over others -- not just with mangoes. I'm not sure what makes them decide one cultivar is tastier than the other.

Wow did we need a colder winter. Finding those flipping grey and orange striped weevils on other trees now besides my mangos. I found them chewing on an all spice tree. Threw a handful in the canal, fish love them. Guess Ill have to hit those trees with a root drench too. Oddly enough they ignored my graham and pickering which are blooming and have fruit and are in the middle between the infested trees.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 15, 2017, 08:29:05 PM
Grub Go (or Grub Gone ?) might help against the Sri Lanka Weevil--- I haven't tried it, because I don't have a problem.  It is live spores, labeled for about a dozen species of weevils, and about a dozen other non-weevil beetles, but doesn't mention Sri Lanka Weevil.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: ibliz on February 18, 2017, 08:30:57 PM
Aside from thrips, I see some red scales. It's either Aonidiella aurantii or Aonidiella orientalis.
I might be mistaken though, because I have never seen one this small.
Do you have any citrus plant close by ?



(https://s9.postimg.cc/7morr0jjv/Screen_Shot_2017_02_19_at_8_39_55_AM.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/7morr0jjv/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on February 24, 2017, 10:11:06 PM
Aside from thrips, I see some red scales. It's either Aonidiella aurantii or Aonidiella orientalis.
I might be mistaken though, because I have never seen one this small.
Do you have any citrus plant close by ?



(https://s9.postimg.cc/7morr0jjv/Screen_Shot_2017_02_19_at_8_39_55_AM.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/7morr0jjv/)

Thank you for looking.  No citrus nearby, but there are a few Poinsettas close by.  I still haven't treated the plant.  What should I do?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 24, 2017, 10:31:09 PM
In slow-drying weather conditions, spray with horticultural oil, or neem oil, or Organocide 3-in-1....
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on February 25, 2017, 10:07:38 AM
In slow-drying weather conditions, spray with horticultural oil, or neem oil, or Organocide 3-in-1....

Ok I'll try that ASAP and try to have it under control before summer weather starts in South Florida where it's raining almost daily.

EDIT:  Went out to Home Depot today, bought some Neem Oil, and have sprayed it all over the leaves.  Hopefully it doesn't rain tonight..there's threatening grey skies right now..  ::)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: DocFruitFly on March 01, 2017, 01:11:52 PM
Those aren't eggs in the original post, they're puparia cases of braconid wasps. Originally, they were probably on a caterpillar that has since decomposed.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FruitFreak on March 29, 2017, 08:59:40 PM
Drought response and/or nitrogen deficiency.


(https://s17.postimg.cc/pq3t156dn/IMG_2582.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pq3t156dn/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/3s7c7crd7/IMG_2583.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3s7c7crd7/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/nbbxgpq4r/IMG_2584.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nbbxgpq4r/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/axz39t0gb/IMG_2586.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/axz39t0gb/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/v6mgvizrf/IMG_2589.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/v6mgvizrf/)

Is this probably a drought response or could this happen from something else?  Steady decline for this Angie in one wk.  has been on same irrigation as other trees which seem fine (maybe more is needed).  I turned the 20minute watering every other day to every day  All have been fed adequate amounts of fert...?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on April 01, 2017, 12:43:08 PM
The leaf damage looks like mite or thrips damage in cold weather, but the sick branches dying back looks to be some vascular infection of bacteria or fungus.  Put some still-alive branch and leaves into a paper bag, not plastic, and mail to TREC.  Tropical Research and Education Center near Homestead, Florida.

Meanwhile apply some Alliette or Flanker,  or some phosphite product (such as Elemax Foliar Phosphite, or Organocide Plant Doctor.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FruitFreak on April 02, 2017, 08:36:32 AM
The leaf damage looks like mite o thrips damage in cold weather, but the sick branches dying back looks to be some vascular infection of bacteria or fungus.  Put some still-alive brach and leaves into a paper bag, not plastic, and mail to TREC.  Tropical Research and Education Center near Homestead, Florida.

Meanwhile apply some Alliette or Flanker,  or some phosphite product (such as Elemax Foliar Phosphite, or Organocide Plant Doctor.

Thanks Har.  That's a good idea to submit a sample. So strange for such a quick decline.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: simon_grow on April 02, 2017, 05:09:16 PM
Har or anyone else that may know, will baking soda and water work to prevent Powdery Mildew on Mango Inflorescence? I use baking soda and water on my wheatgrass and it completely eliminated the fungus or mold I used to get. I've seen several mentions about using baking soda to prevent Powdery mildew on vegetable crops.

Simon
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: wslau on April 02, 2017, 06:17:51 PM
Simon,
Baking soda can be used against mango powdery mildew.
Was surprised to read that it could be illegal to use though.
https://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/PD-46.pdf (https://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/PD-46.pdf)

I've read that mixes contain baking soda, vegetable oil, and dish soap.
The other ingredients are for emulsification and adherence properties.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: simon_grow on April 02, 2017, 06:48:11 PM
Thanks for the article Warren! I can't believe they can't use it in some places because basking soda is not labeled as a fungicide! I've had amazing results with it, on wheatgrass. Time to spray my Lemon Zest trees for about 15 cents a gallon.

Simon
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on April 02, 2017, 09:25:51 PM
State universities receive a lot of money from product developers to run evaluative experiments.  These sponsors take a dim view of cheap competition for the products that have been developed at great cost and under the heavy burden of bureaucratic regulations and legal hoops to jump through.  So university administrations tend to forbid university employees from favorably mentioning old-time techniques, or home remedies, or un-patentable natural substances.  These employees then tend to believe that their employers' policies are interpretations of the law, and go on willy-nilly telling the public that all that stuff is illegal, though they would be hard-put to find it spelled out in actual law.  When the public believes it and complies, this totalitarian rubbish will later get codified as "industry standards / best management practices"--- regulatory creap having again occurred.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: hcbeck2689 on April 03, 2017, 12:40:00 PM
 I need some help identifying my mango trees problem and how to deal with it.  I recently  bare rooted and repotted it,  and it has had a hard time recovering. The tips of the branches started to turn rotten so I cut them off.  But every time I cut  a little bit more,  it would just go black again.  Is there some product that I can get locally and a small amount?
 I do not know how to post pictures. I have some I took though
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on April 03, 2017, 07:41:22 PM
I need some help identifying my mango trees problem and how to deal with it.  I recently  bare rooted and repotted it,  and it has had a hard time recovering. The tips of the branches started to turn rotten so I cut them off.  But every time I cut  a little bit more,  it would just go black again.  Is there some product that I can get locally and a small amount?
 I do not know how to post pictures. I have some I took though

Why on earth did you bare root it?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: hcbeck2689 on April 04, 2017, 04:35:41 PM
I need some help identifying my mango trees problem and how to deal with it.  I recently  bare rooted and repotted it,  and it has had a hard time recovering. The tips of the branches started to turn rotten so I cut them off.  But every time I cut  a little bit more,  it would just go black again.  Is there some product that I can get locally and a small amount?
 I do not know how to post pictures. I have some I took though

Why on earth did you bare root it?
Because the soil it was in sucked and I wanted to switch to gritty mix. Why? Because these trees will be in containers for decades.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on April 04, 2017, 08:08:15 PM
I need some help identifying my mango trees problem and how to deal with it.  I recently  bare rooted and repotted it,  and it has had a hard time recovering. The tips of the branches started to turn rotten so I cut them off.  But every time I cut  a little bit more,  it would just go black again.  Is there some product that I can get locally and a small amount?
 I do not know how to post pictures. I have some I took though

Why on earth did you bare root it?
Because the soil it was in sucked and I wanted to switch to gritty mix. Why? Because these trees will be in containers for decades.

You say the soil "sucked" yet you put it into a useless mix.  Your problem is probably a combination of bare rooting and using gritty crap. I mean gritty mix...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: hcbeck2689 on April 04, 2017, 11:14:16 PM
I need some help identifying my mango trees problem and how to deal with it.  I recently  bare rooted and repotted it,  and it has had a hard time recovering. The tips of the branches started to turn rotten so I cut them off.  But every time I cut  a little bit more,  it would just go black again.  Is there some product that I can get locally and a small amount?
 I do not know how to post pictures. I have some I took though


Why on earth did you bare root it?
Because the soil it was in sucked and I wanted to switch to gritty mix. Why? Because these trees will be in containers for decades.

You say the soil "sucked" yet you put it into a useless mix.  Your problem is probably a combination of bare rooting and using gritty crap. I mean gritty mix...
Your comment doesn't help me in any way and I was hesitant to even mention the gritty mix bc I didn't want to catch crap. It's disappointing that such a large contributor to the forum  would respond like this in a degrading manner.
I bare rooted three trees and the other two are doing fine. Reguardless, I know that it was the bare rooting that hurt it. I am asking for help dealing with the black rot, not my preference of soil.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FruitFreak on April 05, 2017, 09:29:06 AM
I need some help identifying my mango trees problem and how to deal with it.  I recently  bare rooted and repotted it,  and it has had a hard time recovering. The tips of the branches started to turn rotten so I cut them off.  But every time I cut  a little bit more,  it would just go black again.  Is there some product that I can get locally and a small amount?
 I do not know how to post pictures. I have some I took though

Why on earth did you bare root it?
Because the soil it was in sucked and I wanted to switch to gritty mix. Why? Because these trees will be in containers for decades.

You say the soil "sucked" yet you put it into a useless mix.  Your problem is probably a combination of bare rooting and using gritty crap. I mean gritty mix...
Your comment doesn't help me in any way and I was hesitant to even mention the gritty mix bc I didn't want to catch crap. It's disappointing that such a large contributor to the forum  would respond like this in a degrading manner.
I bare rooted three trees and the other two are doing fine. Reguardless, I know that it was the bare rooting that hurt it. I am asking for help dealing with the black rot, not my preference of soil.

Try putting it into a light well draining mix of soil and let the roots and tree recover for awhile if not too late.  I contemplated gritty mix at one time but scrapped the idea as it seems labor intensive, costly, no advantage over pre-made mixes (fafard, foxfarm, promix, any local horti-mix), and of course how much it weighs.  If the tree in question is relatively young I'd do as I mentioned above and start with another 3gal.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Jontte on April 05, 2017, 02:35:58 PM
Hi folks!

I have a soon-to-be one year old mango in largish pot. Soil type is loose, gritty mix like with more organic matter.
Drains well but holds on moisture so it needs watering about once a week.

I live in Finland, so it is a indoor plant, and as a light source I have two 100w CFLs. Kelvin rate 6500.
It shares the light setup with other various tropicals, which are doing just great.

The relative moisture in the air is pretty or too low. It sticks around 50% at winters and raises to around 70% in the summer.
Although I mist my plants 2-4 times a day.

I fertlize it with a fertilizer with NPK 13-7-20(I have no idea if this is a good ratio for mangoes..). Contains macros.
I did add some iron sulphate last month and couple of weeks ago I watered it with Epsom salt(magnesium sulphate).
As a source of calsium it gets powdered eggshells now and then.


The mango pushes out new growth at nice speed, BUT, the new growth seems to have some kind of disease or something.
The new leaves looks a bit pale, some minor black spots here and there, and the underside of new leaves are oozing out some sort of sticky syrupy-like texture. I guess the black spots are a fungy which lives on the "syrup".
The suryp tastes kind of bitter-sweet(yes, I have done a couple of taste-tests..).
Theres no pests to be found, Ive checked the whole plant with a loop a couple of times. No nothing.

Have you guys some idea about what it might be? Too much/too little water, bad fertilizer, something else?


Thank you in beforehand!

Cheers from Finland, where spring starts to kick in! :)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: shinzo on April 06, 2017, 02:31:46 AM
Hi guys, i have too seedlings (polyembrionic) which were grown indoors and in front of a large glass window since last september, at the end of the winter i noticed the discoloration of some leaves (of both seedlings, is it due to temperature variation? low humidity or lack of watering (i water once a week)? or is it a fungal disease?

Seedling 1 (i'm planning to plant it in the ground next week if it is not a fungal disease)

(https://s7.postimg.cc/45ojn3r6j/DSC_2717.jpg)

Seedling 2 (at the right side of the picture)

(https://s10.postimg.cc/dyy2sxxd5/DSC_2718.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Domnik on April 06, 2017, 05:17:23 AM

The new leaves looks a bit pale, some minor black spots here and there, and the underside of new leaves are oozing out some sort of sticky syrupy-like texture. I guess the black spots are a fungy which lives on the "syrup".
The suryp tastes kind of bitter-sweet(yes, I have done a couple of taste-tests..).
Theres no pests to be found, Ive checked the whole plant with a loop a couple of times. No nothing.

Have you guys some idea about what it might be? Too much/too little water, bad fertilizer, something else?


Hi Jontte. It is probably because scale insects (diaspididae). At the beginning - it is quite difficult to see them when they are young and not a professional gardener, but when you hit it several times in the future you will recognize without a problem. You have to know that scale insects (+ aphids and spider mites - Tetranychidae) love mangoes. Scale insects can move from other plants in your home, aphids and spider mites usually get trough by open window  or from other plants.

Diaspididae (if you git them) are hard to remove. Their secretion is called fall. It is sticky and sweet. Basidiomycota family mushroom develop on it - then its change color to black.
I suggest to take the magnifying glass and carefully check the mango. It might help. Good luck.

shinzo, i think you have not perfect soil in your pot. It should be more aerated soil (with the addition of vermiculite or other mineral). It seems to me that you water the plant too often. The ground should dry at the top before you watering land again. When soil little dry at the top - then the roots get some air. At the moment the roots of your plant are largely rotting.
Regards. Dominik
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on April 06, 2017, 09:30:14 AM
Shinzo, It looks like excessive soil-mineral-salts burn, and I see mineral accumulation on the pot, both on top at the edge of the soil, and at the bottom, outside.

Take it where you can hold up the pot and run several gallons of water through it, to flush out salts.  Then momentarily remove it from the pot (but don't bare root it), and add some fresh soil at the bottom of the pot, and then place the plant and root ball back in the pot, with a little fresh soil also around the edges. Don't bury the root-crown.
The pot should be almost full of soil, with about 1 centimeter plastic lip of container above soil to hold water from running over.

Don't use manure or compost, and don't use any fertilizer with more than 8% Nitrogen.  Also don't use fertilizer with Muriate of Potash (Potassium Chloride).
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on April 06, 2017, 09:48:52 AM
Jontte,

1) The baby scales are transparent little circles, like cellophane, closely pressed to the bottom of the leaf, the leaf which is above the leaf that is covered with shiny honeydew or blackened on the upper surface.  Your magnifier should be 8X or 10X, and you need strong light at a side-ways angle, to see the scale nymphs.

2)  13% Nitrogen is excessive.  8% or less is preferable.

3) There could have been a thrips infestation on the new growth, which would leave oozy scraping damage on the underside of a leaf.  If you washed the leaves, the thrips and their empty exoskeletons could be all gone away to the ground.

4)Deficiency of Copper can cause resinous oozing, not honeydew.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: shinzo on April 06, 2017, 10:08:00 AM
Thanks Domnik and Har, Very useful information. Can i plant it directly in its final spot in the ground (after hardening it during a week or so) ?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on April 06, 2017, 12:32:00 PM
Yes.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Jontte on April 06, 2017, 01:43:15 PM
Jontte,

1) The baby scales are transparent little circles, like cellophane, closely pressed to the bottom of the leaf, the leaf which is above the leaf that is covered with shiny honeydew or blackened on the upper surface.  Your magnifier should be 8X or 10X, and you need strong light at a side-ways angle, to see the scale nymphs.

2)  13% Nitrogen is excessive.  8% or less is preferable.

3) There could have been a thrips infestation on the new growth, which would leave oozy scraping damage on the underside of a leaf.  If you washed the leaves, the thrips and their empty exoskeletons could be all gone away to the ground.

4)Deficiency of Copper can cause resinous oozing, not honeydew.

My loop is 30X, so I guess I would have seen some pests if there is any..
I dont know if it is honeydew, but it is sticky. It might be the copper deficiency but we'll see. It's right now pushing new growth, and so far it seems to be healthy growth. Luckily.

What are the symptoms for calcium deficiency?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on April 06, 2017, 02:21:42 PM
Calcium deficiency is often not obvious--- lack of vigor, lack of robustness, lack of health, lack of resistance to weather or fungi--- can contribute, along with other deficiencies, to branch dieback, tip dieback.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: shinzo on April 07, 2017, 04:43:41 AM
Shinzo, It looks like excessive soil-mineral-salts burn, and I see mineral accumulation on the pot, both on top at the edge of the soil, and at the bottom, outside.

Take it where you can hold up the pot and run several gallons of water through it, to flush out salts.  Then momentarily remove it from the pot (but don't bare root it), and add some fresh soil at the bottom of the pot, and then place the plant and root ball back in the pot, with a little fresh soil also around the edges. Don't bury the root-crown.
The pot should be almost full of soil, with about 1 centimeter plastic lip of container above soil to hold water from running over.

Don't use manure or compost, and don't use any fertilizer with more than 8% Nitrogen.  Also don't use fertilizer with Muriate of Potash (Potassium Chloride).

Just to update you guys with the situation. I flushed the pots today, and i noticed what seems like gnats larvae floating when i flushed it. They may have been causing some damage to the roots which may also be another contributor to the situation. I hope planting them outdoors will fix this larvae issue.
Can i do the same flushing thing with 15 inches tall soursop seedlings potted in the same potting soil (they lost their leaves and are now pushing new leaves)? they show the same accumulation of salts and minerals in the edges of the pots.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: shinzo on April 07, 2017, 05:56:51 AM

Shinzo, It looks like excessive soil-mineral-salts burn, and I see mineral accumulation on the pot, both on top at the edge of the soil, and at the bottom, outside.

Take it where you can hold up the pot and run several gallons of water through it, to flush out salts.  Then momentarily remove it from the pot (but don't bare root it), and add some fresh soil at the bottom of the pot, and then place the plant and root ball back in the pot, with a little fresh soil also around the edges. Don't bury the root-crown.
The pot should be almost full of soil, with about 1 centimeter plastic lip of container above soil to hold water from running over.

Don't use manure or compost, and don't use any fertilizer with more than 8% Nitrogen.  Also don't use fertilizer with Muriate of Potash (Potassium Chloride).

Just to update you guys with the situation. I flushed the pots today, and i noticed what seems like gnats larvae floating when i flushed it. They may have been causing some damage to the roots which may also be another contributor to the situation. I hope planting them outdoors will fix this larvae issue (i'm going to use some diy methods like vineagar traps and potatoes traps also) .
Can i do the same flushing thing with 15 inches tall soursop seedlings potted in the same potting soil (they lost their leaves and are now pushing new leaves)? they show the same accumulation of salts and minerals in the edges of the pots.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Domnik on April 07, 2017, 11:34:38 AM
Probably you have some Sciaridae (Sciara militaris) in pot. This insects feed on the rotting residues of seed. Just take the dead seed from the pot. It should solve the problem. After some time the remaining pests will disappear (lack of food).
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on April 12, 2017, 04:30:04 AM
I pugged my lemon zest 2 weeks ago..then i painted the pruning sealer to.the pugged site..

I am quite concerned that the top-side trunk is turning black.

Is that normal? If not, what should i do to save the tree?



(https://s17.postimg.cc/l1e7imxzf/20170411_134339.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/l1e7imxzf/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: shinzo on April 12, 2017, 06:58:38 AM
I pugged my lemon zest 2 weeks ago..then i painted the pruning sealer to.the pugged site..

I am quite concerned that the top-side trunk is turning black.

Is that normal? If not, what should i do to save the tree?



(https://s17.postimg.cc/l1e7imxzf/20170411_134339.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/l1e7imxzf/)
The common advice about pugging is not to seal the wound in order to not trap fungal diseases in the cut. Now after this was done, may be pug it some more inches down (and not seal it this time) in order to take off the ill part if you still have enough space above the graft? but i am not an expert, you should wait for more experienced members to give their advice.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Viking Guy on April 12, 2017, 10:34:00 AM
I pugged my lemon zest 2 weeks ago..then i painted the pruning sealer to.the pugged site..

I am quite concerned that the top-side trunk is turning black.

Is that normal? If not, what should i do to save the tree?



(https://s17.postimg.cc/l1e7imxzf/20170411_134339.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/l1e7imxzf/)

Looks to me like it is spreading.

I will pug it again above that next bud before it reaches that bud also.  You'll lose the heavy branch but possibly save the tree.  No need to seal the wound.

I recently had to pug a Coconut Cream (oh the horror), but it pulled through and I'm sure I can retrain vertical growth on it.

I was left with only about 5 inches of graft after I removed all of the disease, but saved it in the end.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: shinzo on April 12, 2017, 03:47:22 PM
Shinzo, It looks like excessive soil-mineral-salts burn, and I see mineral accumulation on the pot, both on top at the edge of the soil, and at the bottom, outside.

Take it where you can hold up the pot and run several gallons of water through it, to flush out salts.  Then momentarily remove it from the pot (but don't bare root it), and add some fresh soil at the bottom of the pot, and then place the plant and root ball back in the pot, with a little fresh soil also around the edges. Don't bury the root-crown.
The pot should be almost full of soil, with about 1 centimeter plastic lip of container above soil to hold water from running over.

Don't use manure or compost, and don't use any fertilizer with more than 8% Nitrogen.  Also don't use fertilizer with Muriate of Potash (Potassium Chloride).
I planted the two polyembryonic seedlings today after flushing them 3 or 4 days ago. here is the root system of one of them. Are they in good shape? I don't know how to recognize root rot or root circling. as i recall, the tap roots are woody and solid at the touch.
The white gravels were un the bottom of the pot for drainage.

(https://s18.postimg.cc/7gqx8gqm1/Racines.jpg)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on April 16, 2017, 02:19:43 PM
Two or three weeks ago my two mango trees, a Cogshall and a Pickering, both put forth a growth flush.  But on both trees the new growth has all turned black and shriveled.  Never had this before.  I'm guessing fungal issue?
(https://s7.postimg.cc/jnfv0dgc7/20170416_075532.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jnfv0dgc7/)


(https://s21.postimg.cc/wqbfw6ern/20170416_075512.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wqbfw6ern/)

(https://s21.postimg.cc/mjpfg0adv/20170416_075544.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mjpfg0adv/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 16, 2017, 02:24:04 PM
Fungal. We had rain right as new growth was emerging.

Two or three weeks ago my two mango trees, a Cogshall and a Pickering, both put forth a growth flush.  But on both trees the new growth has all turned black and shriveled.  Never had this before.  I'm guessing fungal issue?
(https://s7.postimg.cc/jnfv0dgc7/20170416_075532.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jnfv0dgc7/)


(https://s21.postimg.cc/wqbfw6ern/20170416_075512.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wqbfw6ern/)

(https://s21.postimg.cc/mjpfg0adv/20170416_075544.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mjpfg0adv/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on April 16, 2017, 02:40:28 PM
Yeah, I figured as much.  Too late to treat, I suppose.  Just wait for the next growyh flush?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 16, 2017, 08:45:22 PM
Yep.

Yeah, I figured as much.  Too late to treat, I suppose.  Just wait for the next growyh flush?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: skhan on April 17, 2017, 09:13:07 AM
Two or three weeks ago my two mango trees, a Cogshall and a Pickering, both put forth a growth flush.  But on both trees the new growth has all turned black and shriveled.  Never had this before.  I'm guessing fungal issue?
(https://s7.postimg.cc/jnfv0dgc7/20170416_075532.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jnfv0dgc7/)


(https://s21.postimg.cc/wqbfw6ern/20170416_075512.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wqbfw6ern/)

(https://s21.postimg.cc/mjpfg0adv/20170416_075544.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mjpfg0adv/)

Just spotted this on a few new flushes of my Coc/Cac tree
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on April 17, 2017, 12:19:22 PM
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=1001.msg246084#msg246084 (http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=1001.msg246084#msg246084)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 17, 2017, 01:36:56 PM
You think it's those little leafhoppers again?

[url]http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=1001.msg246084#msg246084[/url] ([url]http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=1001.msg246084#msg246084[/url])
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on April 17, 2017, 06:04:08 PM
Took a thorough look at both trees and didn't find any insects that might be the culprits.  I have to agree with Cookie Monster on this, at least for my trees:  new growth followed by some rains, resulting in a fungus. 
Should I let 'em be and let nature take over?  Or should I cut off the affected growth to help inspire new growth?  If so, where to make the cut?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on April 17, 2017, 07:08:22 PM
Two or three weeks ago my two mango trees, a Cogshall and a Pickering, both put forth a growth flush.  But on both trees the new growth has all turned black and shriveled.  Never had this before.  I'm guessing fungal issue?
(https://s7.postimg.cc/jnfv0dgc7/20170416_075532.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jnfv0dgc7/)


(https://s21.postimg.cc/wqbfw6ern/20170416_075512.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wqbfw6ern/)

(https://s21.postimg.cc/mjpfg0adv/20170416_075544.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mjpfg0adv/)

i had that on my coconut cream a year of growth like that...wasnt normal leaf growth..i decided to inspect the main branches...and i saw a darkish black...then i decided to pug it...i cut in halves the brances and of the main one it was infected with antrancnose
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 17, 2017, 07:17:34 PM
Check at night. I'm going to check tonight too.

Took a thorough look at both trees and didn't find any insects that might be the culprits.  I have to agree with Cookie Monster on this, at least for my trees:  new growth followed by some rains, resulting in a fungus. 
Should I let 'em be and let nature take over?  Or should I cut off the affected growth to help inspire new growth?  If so, where to make the cut?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on April 17, 2017, 08:52:47 PM
Check at night. I'm going to check tonight too.

Took a thorough look at both trees and didn't find any insects that might be the culprits.  I have to agree with Cookie Monster on this, at least for my trees:  new growth followed by some rains, resulting in a fungus. 
Should I let 'em be and let nature take over?  Or should I cut off the affected growth to help inspire new growth?  If so, where to make the cut?


I even saw those small insects... prolly size of a human lice..... light grey color but not a leadhopper
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on April 17, 2017, 09:39:32 PM
Maybe Psilids?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on April 17, 2017, 10:44:52 PM
You think it's those little leafhoppers again?

[url]http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=1001.msg246084#msg246084[/url] ([url]http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=1001.msg246084#msg246084[/url])



Yes.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: knlim000 on April 17, 2017, 11:51:58 PM
has anyone tried grinding up redwood pines to use as pesticides?

I did any experiment yesterday by applying to my mango tree that has little white scales. I grind the pine needles in a blender and rub it onto the mango tree. So far, it's to early to know if it will come back.  Good thing about this is that it's natural as the redwood tree I have do not have any kind of insects on them at all. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on April 18, 2017, 12:22:07 AM
has anyone tried grinding up redwood pines to use as pesticides?

I did any experiment yesterday by applying to my mango tree that has little white scales. I grind the pine needles in a blender and rub it onto the mango tree. So far, it's to early to know if it will come back.  Good thing about this is that it's natural as the redwood tree I have do not have any kind of insects on them at all.

Interesting. It may have an effect because of the smell that may repel pests (perhaps even squirrels)..

In fact, i use laurel leaves where cockroaches are.. They dont return as long as the laurel leaf still there..

There are many natural stuff in nature that can be used instead of buying the products...

Since this was broughten up, I will do an experiment to use carolina reaper peppers  on some of my trees are heavily infested (aphids, and etc)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: ChristineMessner on April 18, 2017, 03:27:49 AM
I'm not sure what type of eggs they are, but I would get a napkin and wipe them off.

maybe the ordinary eggs would do...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on May 02, 2017, 07:51:51 PM
I believe I may be overwatering my newly potted mango plants because I notice the tip of the leaves are brown.  I'm still learning the right amount of water they need, but I was watering every other day.  The issue is easily observed with my Pina Colada, and Honey Kiss, but I noticed it on my Fairchild and Maha Chanok too (Pickering seems to be fine though).  The 1st pic is the Pina Colada.  The following 2 pics are of the Honey Kiss with one of them showing the new growth with the brown tips.  Does it look like a case of too much love for the trees?

(https://s29.postimg.cc/mbpo3ympf/20170502_191703.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mbpo3ympf/)

(https://s29.postimg.cc/pwq50xgmr/20170502_191606.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pwq50xgmr/)

(https://s29.postimg.cc/3yto751mb/20170502_191544.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3yto751mb/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 03, 2017, 09:34:25 AM
The second and third pictures remind me of "mouse ear" in Pecans, due to lack of Urease Enzyme to fully process urea--- un-utilized urea accumulates in the tips of the pecan leaves and kills the cells there.  Nickel is the central atom of urease, so when there is Nickel deficiency, urease can't be made.  Though Nickel has long been dreaded as a poisenous heavy metal contaminant, many plants actually need just a trace of it--- even less than is needed of Molybdenum.

I'm not aware of anyone's having studied Nickel in Mango trees, so I am speculating about relevancy here.

You can get some Nickel by applying Seaweed Extracts, or by using fertilizers containing Nickel "contaminant."  Find out which by visiting Washington State's specialized website for heavy metals in fertilizers.

Avoid using any fertilizer containing Urea.

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on May 03, 2017, 08:00:09 PM
The second and third pictures remind me of "mouse ear" in Pecans, due to lack of Urease Enzyme to fully process urea--- un-utilized urea accumulates in the tips of the pecan leaves and kills the cells there.  Nickel is the central atom of urease, so when there is Nickel deficiency, urease can't be made.  Though Nickel has long been dreaded as a poisenous heavy metal contaminant, many plants actually need just a trace of it--- even less than is needed of Molybdenum.

I'm not aware of anyone's having studied Nickel in Mango trees, so I am speculating about relevancy here.

You can get some Nickel by applying Seaweed Extracts, or by using fertilizers containing Nickel "contaminant."  Find out which by visiting Washington State's specialized website for heavy metals in fertilizers.

Avoid using any fertilizer containing Urea.

I think you're spot on.  The majority of the medium in the pots is roughly 60% Fafard 3, 20% Premium Fafard Organic Compost, and 20% Fox Farm Happy Frog.  I did some additional research and the fertilizer in Fox Farm Happy Frog contains urea, so that's probably what's causing it.

To correct it, I bought https://drearth.com/products/liquid-fertilizers/100-natural-seaweed-extract/, that should work right?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: strkpr00 on May 07, 2017, 10:23:18 AM
I am loaded with this on just about all my mango trees, it seems to coincide with low fruit pruduction.
(https://s27.postimg.cc/agxo0alu7/20170503_190110.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/agxo0alu7/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: strkpr00 on May 07, 2017, 10:29:12 AM
I don't think its lac scale as it is not symmetrical.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: msk0072 on May 10, 2017, 08:33:56 AM
My V. Pride potted mango has bark problem Braun bark with small ctacks. I sprayed twice with Cooper Ox. Chloride.
It seems not to spead further. Any idea what is it? Fungal attack?

(https://s8.postimg.cc/h041wiv35/DSC01499.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/h041wiv35/)

(https://s10.postimg.cc/4j3n6gu91/DSC01501.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4j3n6gu91/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 10, 2017, 02:00:27 PM
edited
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FruitFreak on May 10, 2017, 05:26:26 PM
STRKPR00, when one magnifies the picture, one can see four distinct lobes:  Lobate Lac Scale.

Hey Har.  Are you sure about this being lobate lac scale?  I have this on some of my trees and it looks more like an algae or fungus.  I definitely have comparison because the lobate lac seems to enjoy some of my carambola, miracle fruit, and nearby native cocoplums.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 10, 2017, 09:37:03 PM
I guess I was seeing what I wanted to see in the fuzzy image.   Yes it does look like algal or fungal growth, probably red algae.   Sprays with soap or oil or copper, not all at once. should eventually clear that up.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bigalxx15 on May 17, 2017, 11:18:32 AM
Can someone tell me what's going on with the leaves on my Fruit Punch mango tree. I have had it in 7 gallon nursery pot for over a year and I plan on stepping it up this weekend.
Some of the new growth looks fine then other leaves are curling and drying up. Out of the ten varieties of mangoes I have this is only happening to the FP mango tree.
Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

(https://s4.postimg.cc/igu85ra1l/IMG_3971.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/igu85ra1l/)

(https://s24.postimg.cc/gfi1mgxcx/IMG_3972.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/gfi1mgxcx/)

(https://s4.postimg.cc/jzqtya909/IMG_4001.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jzqtya909/)

(https://s10.postimg.cc/5y9ji7491/IMG_4002.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5y9ji7491/)

(https://s24.postimg.cc/reh3t93j5/IMG_4004.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/reh3t93j5/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: JF on May 17, 2017, 11:31:42 AM
Can someone tell me what's going on with the leaves on my Fruit Punch mango tree. I have had it in 7 gallon nursery pot for over a year and I plan on stepping it up this weekend.
Some of the new growth looks fine then other leaves are curling and drying up. Out of the ten varieties of mangoes I have this is only happening to the FP mango tree.
Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

(https://s4.postimg.cc/igu85ra1l/IMG_3971.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/igu85ra1l/)

(https://s24.postimg.cc/gfi1mgxcx/IMG_3972.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/gfi1mgxcx/)

(https://s4.postimg.cc/jzqtya909/IMG_4001.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jzqtya909/)

(https://s10.postimg.cc/5y9ji7491/IMG_4002.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5y9ji7491/)

(https://s24.postimg.cc/reh3t93j5/IMG_4004.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/reh3t93j5/)
 

That looks like the new growth that gets fry during Santa Ana's here in SoCal. Do you spray roundup around your trees?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bigalxx15 on May 17, 2017, 11:39:31 AM
No roundup around my house. The strange thing is it's only happening to the FP and there are other mango trees next to it.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: JF on May 17, 2017, 01:39:29 PM
No roundup around my house. The strange thing is it's only happening to the FP and there are other mango trees next to it.
That's funny my FP looks crappy I wonder if it's some weird pathogen to this variety
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on May 17, 2017, 02:04:59 PM
Perhaps some pathogen is clogging the xylem?

It would be a good idea to send these pictures to the University of Florida Extension Service at TREC.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on May 17, 2017, 07:35:08 PM
Perhaps some pathogen is clogging the xylem?

It would be a good idea to send these pictures to the University of Florida Extension Service at TREC.

I think I have Randy Ploetz's email at the office.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: AlwaysHotinFL on June 13, 2017, 10:11:11 PM
Checked this whole thread and couldn't find my problem.

Just purchased a 7 gallon Venus from a local nursery- i think it might have been a little neglected, but it was my only option for this variety. My question is it has several ulcerated gray areas on the leaves, some of which have flaked away. It doesn't seem to be affecting the health of the tree, but then again, I've only had it for 3 days and its only been in the ground for 2. Seems more pest related than disease, but then again I'm no Har or Rob or anybody else with experience.

If you enlarge the second image you can see scattered spots on other leaves as well.

Muchas Gracias


(https://s12.postimg.cc/8x68zxjt5/image1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8x68zxjt5/)

(https://s12.postimg.cc/e9v3e27pl/image2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/e9v3e27pl/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on June 13, 2017, 11:00:05 PM
Maybe it fell over against something hot?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: AlwaysHotinFL on June 14, 2017, 11:25:26 AM
I suppose anything is possible Har. Ultimately if you're not worried about it than neither am I. Not to mention fruit is still 1-2 years in the future, and I'd rather not spray a tree while it is establishing unless necessary.

Thanks!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Clay on June 21, 2017, 12:55:52 PM
Hi,

I have two small mango trees that have been in the ground two years. The first two years, they branched out and grew fairly vigorously, although one is still a bit spindly. This year, their growth seems to be stunted. They have already tried to push out new branches, which seem to die off as quickly as they emerge. Both trees are slowly starting to form some new leaf buds for another growth flush, but I wanted an opinion on whether something is wrong. They just seem much slower in pushing out new growth than they were in the last two years, with the first round of growth drying up and dying off. Overall the trees look pretty healthy in the existing leaves, although tree #1 has started dropping a few leaves in the last week or so.

These trees are growing in a raised bed with a small retaining wall. The attached photos show the previous growth buds that dried up and died, along with some new buds forming. Should I worry?

Thanks!

Clay

(https://s7.postimg.cc/4vp8yyouv/Tree_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4vp8yyouv/)

(https://s7.postimg.cc/erqbylumv/Tree_1a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/erqbylumv/)

(https://s7.postimg.cc/mtekgidef/Tree_1b.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mtekgidef/)

(https://s7.postimg.cc/o22g255cn/Tree_1c.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/o22g255cn/)

(https://s7.postimg.cc/9k58u5e1j/Tree_1d.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9k58u5e1j/)

(https://s7.postimg.cc/au32977tj/Tree_2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/au32977tj/)

(https://s7.postimg.cc/omhh4tyl3/Tree_2a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/omhh4tyl3/)

(https://s7.postimg.cc/9nz2aejiv/Tree_2b.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9nz2aejiv/)

(https://s7.postimg.cc/5dkeetefr/Tree_2c.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5dkeetefr/)

(https://s7.postimg.cc/6rc1a4dp3/Tree_2d.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6rc1a4dp3/)

(https://s7.postimg.cc/3vucpikbb/Tree_2e.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3vucpikbb/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on June 21, 2017, 10:19:20 PM
When tip-cutting is done just above the beginning node of a growth flush, as was done on all these branches pictured, too many buds are activated, in a scrunched-up space.

Those terminal knobs, and the tops of the branches with the top circle of four or five leaves, should be cut off--- and they should be thrown away, in case there are microscopic bud mites in the budcovers.

Also be sure that your fertilizers and micro-nutrient mixes have Boron, Copper, Zinc, and Calcium, as well as the other nutrients, to ensure healthy buds.

And keep excess soil and mulch pulled away from the base of the trunk.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Clay on June 22, 2017, 10:25:04 AM
When tip-cutting is done just above the beginning node of a growth flush, as was done on all these branches pictured, too many buds are activated, in a scrunched-up space.

Just to clarify, are you saying that when tip-cutting I should cut midway between the nodes rather than right above the nodes?

Thank you Har!

Clay
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on June 22, 2017, 02:06:08 PM
No, just half-an-inch or so below the node.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: shinzo on June 22, 2017, 05:19:09 PM
No, just half-an-inch or so below the node.
For a the case of a flushing young tree, which of the following two tipping options is more effective to trigger rapidly a second vegetative flush (for tree shaping purpose)?
1 - profit from the fact that the tree is flushing and tip the branches once the stem is completely elongated but without waiting for the leaves to harden off? (is there a risk that the second flush comes weak due to it using the left over energy from the current flush? or is it the opposite which is true, i mean the second flush profit from the momentum triggered by the current flush)
2 - wait for the current flush to harden off and the tree to recover from the current effort and gather some more energy before tipping again ?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on June 23, 2017, 08:33:27 PM
Either way.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: behlgarden on June 26, 2017, 01:18:41 PM
I am redoing my mango pests and diseases treatment this summer after seeing dieback. I plan on doing the following drench and foliar:
1. Abound fungicide
2. Apply Mn.
3. Use micro nutrient mix that has Mn, Cu, Fe, S, Boron, and Mg. 
4. Finally on newly planted and stunted plants, I am planning to use Superthrive growth hormone. stay tuned for before and after pictures.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Saltee on June 26, 2017, 08:16:28 PM
Well summer has brought weevils to my mango tree and my peach tree. For some reason they are only eating my Graham mango and Flogrande peach, but my Nam Doc Mai has perfect leaves 15 feet away. I'm not sure if they are little notchersnor Sri Lanka weevils... but I did a imidacloprid treatment (bayer lol)

I noticed these things huddling together and playing hide and seek with me, what are they? They were focused on the stem... borer?
(https://s8.postimg.cc/9bwr3nqlt/IMG_5222.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9bwr3nqlt/)

(https://s8.postimg.cc/ck18gpcvl/IMG_5224.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ck18gpcvl/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: simon_grow on June 26, 2017, 09:31:18 PM
Looks like sharpshooters to me. I believe there is a possibility that they can transfer diseases because they suck the juice from new growth.

Simon
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Saltee on June 26, 2017, 09:55:28 PM
Well summer has brought weevils to my mango tree and my peach tree. For some reason they are only eating my Graham mango and Flogrande peach, but my Nam Doc Mai has perfect leaves 15 feet away. I'm not sure if they are little notchersnor Sri Lanka weevils... but I did a imidacloprid treatment (bayer lol)

I noticed these things huddling together and playing hide and seek with me, what are they? They were focused on the stem... borer?
(https://s8.postimg.cc/9bwr3nqlt/IMG_5222.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9bwr3nqlt/)

(https://s8.postimg.cc/ck18gpcvl/IMG_5224.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ck18gpcvl/)

My poor tree is getting bombarded by hoppers and weevils... good thing it's a vigorous tree. Things flushing like crazy
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Saltee on June 26, 2017, 11:09:41 PM
Looks like sharpshooters to me. I believe there is a possibility that they can transfer diseases because they suck the juice from new growth.

Simon

Oh wow they are actually called sharpshooters... I thought it was a hopper because it kinda resembled it
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: 561MangoFanatic on June 27, 2017, 12:06:36 AM

(https://s1.postimg.cc/oenn5f00r/IMG_2612.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/oenn5f00r/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/am989s997/IMG_2613.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/am989s997/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/6skdedhaz/IMG_2614.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6skdedhaz/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/ln8ysjqvv/IMG_2615.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ln8ysjqvv/)

What is doing this to my Rosa Mango tree? & only Rosa's new leaves? Also how can I prevent & treat it?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on June 27, 2017, 09:52:07 AM
Probably Chafer Beetles, or June Beetles, or grasshoppers....

Catch them and smash them.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Saltee on June 27, 2017, 02:41:15 PM
Do I have anything to worry about with these sharpshooters? All I could find is that they are a problem in California when it comes to grapes, but really nothing else useful. Yesterday after I picked out as many weevils and scared off as many shooters as possible I applied Bauer garden and citrus systemic thru the roots.

Unrelated to mangos but my blood oranges have a caterpillar that looks like bird or lizard crap tearing it up too

Out of curiousity why is it that neither weevil or sharpshooter attack my NDM? Literally all my fruit trees are under attack, except this tree. It amazes me
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: simon_grow on June 27, 2017, 10:58:47 PM
Do I have anything to worry about with these sharpshooters? All I could find is that they are a problem in California when it comes to grapes, but really nothing else useful. Yesterday after I picked out as many weevils and scared off as many shooters as possible I applied Bauer garden and citrus systemic thru the roots.

Unrelated to mangos but my blood oranges have a caterpillar that looks like bird or lizard crap tearing it up too

Out of curiousity why is it that neither weevil or sharpshooter attack my NDM? Literally all my fruit trees are under attack, except this tree. It amazes me


It could be that the NDM produces a compound, perhaps a turpene that the weevils and sharpshooters do not like. See reply 7 from this thread. http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=20816.0 (http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=20816.0)

That thread talks more about rootstock influence but the scion can have the same affect.

I'm not sure how detrimental a bug the sharpshooters are in Florida but anytime there is a wound in a tree, there is an opening for microorganism to enter and gain a foothold. I've seen sharpshooters on my Citrus as well and I sure hope that citrus diseases can't be passed onto mangos and vice versa.

Simon
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: simon_grow on June 27, 2017, 11:03:37 PM
I am redoing my mango pests and diseases treatment this summer after seeing dieback. I plan on doing the following drench and foliar:
1. Abound fungicide
2. Apply Mn.
3. Use micro nutrient mix that has Mn, Cu, Fe, S, Boron, and Mg. 
4. Finally on newly planted and stunted plants, I am planning to use Superthrive growth hormone. stay tuned for before and after pictures.

Hey Behl, that sounds like a plan. We just have to be careful to have a well planned out schedule for alternating fungicides so that the disease pressures don't build up immunity to any specific class of fungicide. I believe Abound can be used 2-3 times but I have to check my notes.

Simon
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: behlgarden on June 28, 2017, 10:40:11 AM
Simon,

I saw some dieback and blackening of wood at tip ends. Normally per my observation all this starts with terminal end when bloom is removed OR wood is pruned, probably it exposes wood to elements including bacteria and fungus. I recently cut all black ends and dieback wood and sprayed my cocktail mix of fungicide on open wounds. lets see if the blackening continues OR it solves the issue.

I am keeping abound use to twice a year. Once after harvest to conceal wounds, once before bloom in winter/early spring. However, I plan on spraying all open wounds whenever I prune.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on June 29, 2017, 06:51:46 AM
This morning I noticed a few leaves on my Pickering with small white patches.  I only saw 1 leaf like that on my Honey KIss.  Any idea what it may be?  I did a foliar feeding on Sunday with Turf Pro, Indian River Fish Fertilizer, and Dr. Earth Ocean Seaweed - maybe that has something to do with it?
(https://s24.postimg.cc/sz5wt2s9d/20170629_063537.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sz5wt2s9d/)

(https://s24.postimg.cc/x70p1ttox/20170629_063554.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/x70p1ttox/)

(https://s24.postimg.cc/67wu6o781/20170629_063606.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/67wu6o781/)

(https://s24.postimg.cc/wrpf8t7rl/20170629_063632.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wrpf8t7rl/)

(https://s24.postimg.cc/s4jd71kep/20170629_063706_001.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/s4jd71kep/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on June 29, 2017, 06:32:15 PM
That is probably mango scale.  Rub it off, or pressure wash it off.

Or spray with an oil or saop, at label-recommended rates, in slow-drying weather conditions.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on June 29, 2017, 08:30:08 PM
Rubbed it off.  Thank you for your help Har!!!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on June 29, 2017, 10:20:44 PM
Wouldn't spray oil in this heat and sun.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FrankDrebinOfFruits on July 01, 2017, 07:02:42 PM
Planted this DOT last week.

The leaves turned yellow and look dried out. Any ideas?

(https://s12.postimg.cc/fhitfm59l/20170701_095702.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fhitfm59l/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/t3cdk9ny3/20170701_095710.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/t3cdk9ny3/)

(https://s8.postimg.cc/65q5j3nld/20170701_095717.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/65q5j3nld/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on July 01, 2017, 09:49:44 PM
During transportation from the nursery, it may have been exposed to gale-force or hurricane-force winds in an open trailer or pickup.  Or it could have been inside closed, turned-off vehicle in the sun, for 15 minutes or more.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Jose Spain on July 05, 2017, 02:40:17 PM
I have some rootstocks of Gomera 3 getting ready for grafting and today I found out what seems micro-nutrient deficiency in 3 of them. About 7/10 days ago I have fertilised them with guano, but I doubt it did (for good or bad) any effect yet. Seems like a deficiency of Iron or Manganese, but I observed in one of the plants that the leaves are twisting like the horn of a goat and I don't know if that points to another kind of problem.

(https://s9.postimg.cc/hx4bvtuor/P7050004.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/hx4bvtuor/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/foq5ehnkr/P7050001.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/foq5ehnkr/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/8ms7sajyz/P7050002.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8ms7sajyz/)

(https://s9.postimg.cc/3pen76hzv/P7050003.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3pen76hzv/)


Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on July 05, 2017, 09:15:29 PM
I don't recognize that symptom.  Please post again when the leaves mature / harden up.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Jose Spain on July 06, 2017, 03:40:10 PM
I don't recognize that symptom.  Please post again when the leaves mature / harden up.

Thank you Har, I will post pictures when they mature. If you'd have to say what could be just from colour, what would you say? Iron deficiency?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on August 02, 2017, 08:26:30 PM
I notice a lot of black ants underneath the leaves on my Fairchild and Honey Kiss trees, and it looks like they're nesting.  The Fairchild looks a lot worse, and I just started noticing them on the Honey Kiss.  I was doing some Googling, and read that the ants could be a sign of mango scale?  I've been rubbing off small white patches when I see them on leaves, but haven't been spraying Neem or anything.  Are the pics a symptom of the mango scale and this is what happens when it progresses?

FAIRCHILD
(https://s3.postimg.cc/ihascobe7/20170802_193839.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ihascobe7/)

(https://s3.postimg.cc/fhzabtcj3/20170802_194341.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fhzabtcj3/)


HONEYKISS
(https://s3.postimg.cc/rmejsspf3/20170802_193641.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rmejsspf3/)

(https://s3.postimg.cc/3k2bbny5r/20170802_194139.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3k2bbny5r/)

(https://s3.postimg.cc/4wfezt67j/20170802_194221.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4wfezt67j/)




Btw this is an example of the white patches I keep rubbing off:
(https://s24.postimg.cc/sz5wt2s9d/20170629_063537.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sz5wt2s9d/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FruitFreak on August 02, 2017, 09:44:45 PM
I notice a lot of black ants underneath the leaves on my Fairchild and Honey Kiss trees, and it looks like they're nesting.  The Fairchild looks a lot worse, and I just started noticing them on the Honey Kiss.  I was doing some Googling, and read that the ants could be a sign of mango scale?  I've been rubbing off small white patches when I see them on leaves, but haven't been spraying Neem or anything.  Are the pics a symptom of the mango scale and this is what happens when it progresses?

FAIRCHILD
(https://s3.postimg.cc/ihascobe7/20170802_193839.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ihascobe7/)

(https://s3.postimg.cc/fhzabtcj3/20170802_194341.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fhzabtcj3/)


HONEYKISS
(https://s3.postimg.cc/rmejsspf3/20170802_193641.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rmejsspf3/)

(https://s3.postimg.cc/3k2bbny5r/20170802_194139.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3k2bbny5r/)

(https://s3.postimg.cc/4wfezt67j/20170802_194221.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4wfezt67j/)




Btw this is an example of the white patches I keep rubbing off:
(https://s24.postimg.cc/sz5wt2s9d/20170629_063537.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sz5wt2s9d/)

Soft scale if I'm not mistaken but I believe there are many different types.  Ants are attracted to the secreations.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 02, 2017, 10:48:36 PM
Yes, it is mango scale, which is a soft scale.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on August 03, 2017, 03:19:00 AM
Was wondering what killed my 15 gallon lemon zest.

It started to soften(gewy) top line of graft where it receives full sun. Then eventually this as a result.


(https://s3.postimg.cc/pg1n5urqn/20170729_194104.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pg1n5urqn/)


(https://s4.postimg.cc/dflaps35l/20170729_193851.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/dflaps35l/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/od8mey9ij/20170729_193833.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/od8mey9ij/)

(https://s2.postimg.cc/qqp625gqt/20170729_194006.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qqp625gqt/)

(https://s2.postimg.cc/4pz8fn76d/20170729_194003.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4pz8fn76d/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on August 03, 2017, 06:06:08 AM
Thanks Guanabus and FruitFreak!  I'm going to start on a neem oil treatment regimen for the scale then.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 03, 2017, 06:19:48 PM
Not when the temperature is very hot!  Leaves may get burned.

Neem oil, and any other oil or soap, will only work in slow drying conditions, so that an insect stays covered with wet oil or soap until it has suffocated-- if the spray dries too soon, anything can catch its breath again.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: CapeCoralGuy on August 03, 2017, 06:52:04 PM
Thanks everyone for such great information. Im my area, SWFlorida, our number one problem with fruit trees is the sirilanka weebel. Some trees, specially the mamey, lychee, and canisteel varieties seem to be their favorites to colonize.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on August 03, 2017, 08:41:40 PM
Thanks Har.  I just neemed the plants @ 8 PM, so the sun was down.  According to the weather forecast, it shouldn't rain tomorrow in my neck of the woods..fingers crossed.  I'm planning on a second treatment in 2 weeks.

I actually noticed a couple of ants on my Pickering, and slightly more ants on my Maha Chanok.  Upon closer inspection, I did see some of those white patches on both trees.  Is the scab contagious from tree to tree or can ants carry it from tree to tree? 

I'm actually going to be planting out the Pickering this weekend in my backyard, and it will be about 10 feet away from a brand new 7 gallon Sweet Tart.  I'm hoping it's not going to spread!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 04, 2017, 08:33:57 PM
Ants do carry crawlers to new pastures.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on August 04, 2017, 09:38:26 PM
I was outside checking to make sure no neem burn and all looks great, except now I'm noticing sap dripping from one of my Pickering branches.  The Pickering doesn't have as many ants on it, really not bad, and I barely notice the scab in it.  I'll be planting it in the ground tomorrow away fro. The Fairchild and Pina Colada which have many more ants and a larger scab issue.

But what could be causing the sap to drip on the Pickering?  Is it related to the scab?
(https://s2.postimg.cc/zcfffl6c5/20170804_193245.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/zcfffl6c5/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 05, 2017, 03:15:12 PM
You mean scale, not scab.

This picture shows where a leaf was broken off, and the wound "bled."
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on August 06, 2017, 03:23:30 PM
Thank you Har!  Indeed, I meant scale and not scab.  I removed a couple leaves with the scale the prior day, so you're spot on.  Glad to know its not disease relayed.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropheus76 on August 07, 2017, 08:16:20 AM
I imagine with the lack of winter we have had the last couple years is why we suddenly have started seeing these new weevils, the grey and orange ones that use their legs to latch onto your fingers when you pic them up. They have some peculiar eating habits. I have seen them on Graham and Lemon zest, while they completely ignored the Cotton Candy, Sweet tart, and pickering. Further they went after my Fuyu Persimmons preventing fruit, my All spice trees, and a couple others here and there, but completely ignored everything in between.

I am not sure what spray to put on them for the roots. This weather kind of annoyed me since in spring we went instantly from 60s weather to 80s and I never had time to put on my neem and/or other oils so root drenching is the only option I have.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Yoda on August 07, 2017, 11:24:26 AM
Need some help with this seedling. Looks like anthracnose to me: 

(https://s1.postimg.cc/pbjh6qlxn/Photo_07-08-17_18_05_51.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pbjh6qlxn/)


Growth at the top has appeared but is halted:

(https://s1.postimg.cc/rinpunr7v/Photo_07-08-17_18_06_10.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rinpunr7v/)


I've sprayed with mancozeb 5 days ago, though the top leaf seems to be deteriorating. Here's a pic of it last week:

(https://s2.postimg.cc/3xo2c41l1/Photo_31-07-17_16_17_30.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3xo2c41l1/)


Lower leaves have black tips. I've added some dried banana peel (potassium) just in case :

(https://s2.postimg.cc/9izhp8m7p/File_30-06-17_17_53_48.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9izhp8m7p/)


Any thoughts / advice would be appreciated.
Thanks!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 07, 2017, 01:12:42 PM
The soil in the container may be staying too wet.  Let the top inch get dry before each watering.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: floridays on August 07, 2017, 08:40:44 PM
Mango Doctors, I have two trees towards the back of my property - a Valencia Pride and a Lancetilla. The VP seems to have stunted growth and small leaves and the Lancetilla has black and dying leaf tips.

I'm guessing it's some deficiency...

Thanks in advance for any recommendations!

Scott

Lancetilla

(http://i299.photobucket.com/albums/mm315/floriday/Yard%20misc/35B5BC7E-D86E-4838-8E61-8BB196103A52_zpsbxgcvd7q.jpg) (http://s299.photobucket.com/user/floriday/media/Yard%20misc/35B5BC7E-D86E-4838-8E61-8BB196103A52_zpsbxgcvd7q.jpg.html)

Valencia Pride

(http://i299.photobucket.com/albums/mm315/floriday/Yard%20misc/4C7C50D5-773D-430C-83E8-2A909468ED4F_zpshrmbomyo.jpg) (http://s299.photobucket.com/user/floriday/media/Yard%20misc/4C7C50D5-773D-430C-83E8-2A909468ED4F_zpshrmbomyo.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Yoda on August 08, 2017, 11:01:01 AM
The soil in the container may be staying too wet.  Let the top inch get dry before each watering.

Hmm. 

The soil does tend to stay curiously humid between watering. I'll start manually watering when the soil dries & also might change the soil with a better draining medium, perhaps a cactus mix. Will that do it? Later on I'll look into gritty mixes.

Thanks for the feedback!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 08, 2017, 03:05:38 PM
Both pictures show multiple deficiencies, especially of Magnesium, Potassium, and Zinc. 

Make sure soil doesn't stay mucky wet, or be in prolonged drought either.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: floridays on August 08, 2017, 04:31:20 PM
Thank you Har, I will treat accordingly. One is in a mucky area that is shaded by larger nuisance trees that will be coming down soon.

Thanks again,

Scott
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Jose Spain on August 10, 2017, 05:37:39 AM
I don't recognize that symptom.  Please post again when the leaves mature / harden up.

Here some new pictures of those twisted leaves today:


(https://s27.postimg.cc/xnefaagxr/P8090020.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xnefaagxr/)


(https://s28.postimg.cc/b9aupvzih/P8090022.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b9aupvzih/)


I think it could be too much heat and sun. It was just this plant, the other 14 rootstocks didn't show this symptom, but here are some with other different ones:

This is happening to 3 of them, leaves dond't develop one of the halves and don't grow properly. I suspect overfertilisation when I added guano at beginning of July:


(https://s27.postimg.cc/6ypzkrum7/P8090024.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6ypzkrum7/)



(https://s28.postimg.cc/cykfyobyh/P8090025.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cykfyobyh/)



(https://s27.postimg.cc/6kw8gmmi7/P8090027.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6kw8gmmi7/)

And finally I lost one rootstock because it dried out after suffering this strange (to me) damage at the base of the stem, I say strange because it just affect to one particular section, the rest seems healthy up and down of it:


(https://s27.postimg.cc/x1yn5aatb/P8090019.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/x1yn5aatb/)

The plant seemed not affected for a few weeks, but finally died:


(https://s27.postimg.cc/59t2lwga7/P8090016.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/59t2lwga7/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 10, 2017, 06:33:08 PM
Jose Spain, pictures 1-5 probably show deficiencies of Zinc, Copper, and Manganese.

I have never worked with guano.  Is it high in Sodium?  That might cause some burns.

The plant that died was girdled, by disease or by scalding water (such as from water in a hose or spray stake irrigation lines, in the sun).  The full circle of dead bark, and dead cambium tissue, prevented any glucose from photosynthesis from going on down to the roots.  Once the roots starved to death, then the top suddenly received no more water.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Clay on August 18, 2017, 12:49:07 PM
My Tequila Sunrise mango tree has been the ground a bit over two years. It has been producing some very nice growth flushes the last two months. About half of the new growth looks healthy, with some leaves over a foot long. But the other half, the new leaves come out twisted, stunted and some just die off. I have been giving it minor element supplements. Does this like some kind of disease, deficiency, or nothing to worry about?

(https://s30.postimg.cc/vko4legh9/TS1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vko4legh9/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/5hc5ryeb1/TS2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5hc5ryeb1/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/sy40qpzvx/TS3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sy40qpzvx/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/vth3xl3vx/TS4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vth3xl3vx/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/pttctxj3h/TS5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pttctxj3h/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/zfmxa8a99/TS6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/zfmxa8a99/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/5vdhrjyel/TS7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5vdhrjyel/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Jose Spain on August 18, 2017, 05:11:07 PM
Jose Spain, pictures 1-5 probably show deficiencies of Zinc, Copper, and Manganese.

I have never worked with guano.  Is it high in Sodium?  That might cause some burns.

The plant that died was girdled, by disease or by scalding water (such as from water in a hose or spray stake irrigation lines, in the sun).  The full circle of dead bark, and dead cambium tissue, prevented any glucose from photosynthesis from going on down to the roots.  Once the roots starved to death, then the top suddenly received no more water.

Sorry, I didn't see this answer until today. Thank you for the explanation. Regarding your question about Na, I don´t know, the box doesn't specify it, it's coming from sea birds and is low in chloride, this is the info it gives:
(https://s4.postimg.cc/nb3c829d5/P8180005.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nb3c829d5/)

After reading your answer, I think that it's very likely that the deficiencies were caused by excess of one particular element as a result of overfertilization with the guano (I'm washing out that posible excess by overwatering these plants). Actually last flushes seem to be OK. I'll keep updating is something interesting comes up. Thanks  ;)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: shinzo on August 18, 2017, 06:20:59 PM
My Tequila Sunrise mango tree has been the ground a bit over two years. It has been producing some very nice growth flushes the last two months. About half of the new growth looks healthy, with some leaves over a foot long. But the other half, the new leaves come out twisted, stunted and some just die off. I have been giving it minor element supplements. Does this like some kind of disease, deficiency, or nothing to worry about?

(https://s30.postimg.cc/vko4legh9/TS1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vko4legh9/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/5hc5ryeb1/TS2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5hc5ryeb1/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/sy40qpzvx/TS3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sy40qpzvx/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/vth3xl3vx/TS4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vth3xl3vx/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/pttctxj3h/TS5.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pttctxj3h/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/zfmxa8a99/TS6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/zfmxa8a99/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/5vdhrjyel/TS7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5vdhrjyel/)
I thing zinc deficieny and some insects sucking the sap of the young leaves when they are flushing. Forum experts may give you more accurate diagnosis.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 18, 2017, 09:24:48 PM
Yes, Zinc deficiency and Copper deficiency, and maybe some excess Boron or Sodium.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Clay on August 19, 2017, 12:55:00 PM
Yes, Zinc deficiency and Copper deficiency, and maybe some excess Boron or Sodium.
I have been using the Southern Ag Essential Minor Elements about once a month, about ¼ to ½ cup spread in the ring at the drip line. It contains: Magnesium 8%, Manganese 2%, Iron 5%, Sulfur 8%, Copper .25%, Zinc 0.5%, Boron .03%. Is it safe to use more?

The confusing part to me is, how can some branches have lush healthy growth, while other branches have the weak stunted flushes? I would have thought that whole tree would more uniformly weak if there is a deficiency. I don't see any signs of fungus or disease. I do see the occasional sharpshooter on the plant, but no infestations. I just hose off the sharpshooters and they fly away.

My second mango tree (Gold Coast) about ten feet away isn't having any of these symptoms.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: ibliz on August 19, 2017, 02:23:48 PM


(https://s30.postimg.cc/5hc5ryeb1/TS2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5hc5ryeb1/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/sy40qpzvx/TS3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sy40qpzvx/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/vth3xl3vx/TS4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vth3xl3vx/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/zfmxa8a99/TS6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/zfmxa8a99/)


These look a lot like thrip damages. Can you post a picture of the underside of the new leaves? Better yet, if you have a 10x magnifying glass, look at the underside of the leaves and check if there is any elongated critters.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Clay on August 19, 2017, 11:35:23 PM
These look a lot like thrip damages. Can you post a picture of the underside of the new leaves? Better yet, if you have a 10x magnifying glass, look at the underside of the leaves and check if there is any elongated critters.

While I don't know what thrips look like, I do keep a pretty keen eye out for pests. I have aphids and spider mites on other plants around the yard occasionally, but not on the mango trees so far. I do see one or two sharpshooters on the new mango branches once in awhile, and I either shake them off, or blast them with water.

I tried to get a bunch of close-ups of the undersides of the leaves, but they look pretty clean to me, even though they are curling up and turning brown. On one of them, I noticed there are also brown spots on the branch. Keep in mind that only about half of the new leaf flushes look curled,  brown and stunted. The other new flushes look very robust and healthy (i.e.: normal), some with leaves over a foot long.



(https://s30.postimg.cc/bd7xkupd9/IMG_4739.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bd7xkupd9/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/lklvjim7h/IMG_4740.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/lklvjim7h/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/vfd0pqq5p/IMG_4741.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vfd0pqq5p/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/f32z00bu5/IMG_4743.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/f32z00bu5/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/temh4wu0d/IMG_4744.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/temh4wu0d/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/5xum658fh/IMG_4745.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5xum658fh/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/pxkf1xuy5/IMG_4746.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pxkf1xuy5/)


(https://s30.postimg.cc/476zqx1il/IMG_4747.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/476zqx1il/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/he1146mlp/IMG_4748.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/he1146mlp/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/eca8u89gt/IMG_4751.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/eca8u89gt/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/40xw1khrh/IMG_4757.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/40xw1khrh/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/cuosio4q5/IMG_4758.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/cuosio4q5/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/sc7p8mlt9/IMG_4759.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sc7p8mlt9/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/82adthkod/IMG_4761.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/82adthkod/)

(https://s30.postimg.cc/uppmzn08d/IMG_4762.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/uppmzn08d/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 20, 2017, 12:45:56 PM
Nice set of pictures!

The tender top leaves look seriously deficient in Zinc and Copper, and the previous flush looks mildly deficient in Iron--- so the new growth is probably also deficient in Iron.

Spraying the Southern Ag Citrus micronutrient mix at a dilute / weak / lowest-recommended rate, with  some kelp added, on the new growth and on the still-hardening-up previous flush, in the very early morning, or before sunset, would be more effective than the drenching in this case--- as you have already found that not enough is rising from the soil, to some portions of your tree.

As Ibliz pointed out, the scorch marks do look like thrips damage--- but that still needs to be verified.

Do you have a traditional magnifier, in the 8X to 16X range?  Or a digital camara phone attachment to take microscopic pictures?

The stem blackening looks like anthracnose.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Clay on August 20, 2017, 03:18:46 PM
Nice set of pictures!

The tender top leaves look seriously deficient in Zinc and Copper, and the previous flush looks mildly deficient in Iron--- so the new growth is probably also deficient in Iron.

Spraying the Southern Ag Citrus micronutrient mix at a dilute / weak / lowest-recommended rate, with  some kelp added, on the new growth and on the still-hardening-up previous flush, in the very early morning, or before sunset, would be more effective than the drenching in this case--- as you have already found that not enough is rising from the soil, to some portions of your tree.

As Ibliz pointed out, the scorch marks do look like thrips damage--- but that still needs to be verified.

Do you have a traditional magnifier, in the 8X to 16X range?  Or a digital camara phone attachment to take microscopic pictures?

The stem blackening looks like anthracnose.

I picked up a jug of Iron & Zinc chelate liquid and did a foliar spray this morning. My Myer lemon was also having some yellowing on some of its leaves, so I sprayed my citrus trees and my apple tree while I was at it. It looks like Home Depot also has the Southern Ag Citrus nutritional spray in stock, so I'll pick up a jug of that next time I'm over there. How often should I use it? Monthly? Weekly?

I don't have any macro attachments for my phone or camera, nor a microscope, so those pictures are about the best I can do.

Should I prune off all the damaged areas and just let the healthy areas grow? Or will the damaged areas sprout out new healthy leaves after getting the foliar micro-nutrients?

I did get a soil test kit and tested around a few of my trees. I got pH readings in the 6.0 - 6.5 range, which doesn't seem too bad, although 5.0 might be better.

Thanks for the suggestions!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 20, 2017, 09:05:32 PM
I might cut off the one twig with the anthracnose in the bark;  otherwise, just spray on the nutrients, per labeled directions.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: ibliz on August 21, 2017, 12:31:28 PM
Clay and Har

It is not a thrip damage because the underside of the leaves midribs are squeaky clean.


Thrip damage would look like this from the underside.
(https://s27.postimg.cc/np5d5ea5b/Thrips_Damage_01.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/np5d5ea5b/)


I have, however, encountered something similar to your problem, but in a much more milder way :
:
(https://s27.postimg.cc/rzk10zf8f/Unknown_Disorder.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rzk10zf8f/)

I had no idea what caused it at that time, and the problem went away before I could find a remedy.

I tried browsing through my books on mangoes and found this :

(https://s27.postimg.cc/z46fnrbvj/Screen_Shot_2017-08-21_at_11.22.44_PM.png) (https://postimg.cc/image/z46fnrbvj/)

So it could be caused by multiple micro nutrient deficiency.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Clay on August 21, 2017, 03:23:17 PM
Thank you Har and Ibliz for the recommendations. I think that I was a bit baffled because some branches were robust and healthy, while others looked weak and stunted. I would have guessed that a nutrient deficiency would affect the whole tree pretty much evenly, but I see now that this not the case. I will give it a foliar spray with the minors twice a month for the next couple of months, plus more on the soil at the drip line. I'm doing the same for my grapefruit and Meyer lemon, and my Fuji Apple tree. I am glad to know there is no major disease or infestation happening!

Happy Fruiting!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FruitFool on August 26, 2017, 01:47:14 PM
(https://s27.postimg.cc/bpcmlxfpr/Mango_Graft.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bpcmlxfpr/)

Hello, Experts,

My ST graft on a seedling seems to have gotten some disease on the root stock, I see bark turning brown on the root stock, just above the plastic bag.
I saw lot of ant activity going in the plastic bag, so to get them out, I over-watered the root zone, I am not sure if that is the cause?

Please let me know how to save this young tree?

Thanks,
FruitFool
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 27, 2017, 12:07:45 AM
Looks serious!

Did you paint vaseline or tangle-foot on it, to keep off the ants?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FruitFool on August 27, 2017, 12:20:18 AM
Hi, Har,

No tangle foot used.
Had only drowned the root zone in water after seeing lot of ants. It is possible that the bark
was already browning and I did not notice at that time.

It was alright with all green bark in my nursing area where I keep all my grafts under papaya
shade, I thought this plant is ready to go in ground (last week) so moved it out under another
tree where it gets some dappled sun light before moving to full sun.

Thanks,
FruitFool
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: shinzo on August 27, 2017, 06:27:11 AM
Looks serious!

Did you paint vaseline or tangle-foot on it, to keep off the ants?
Hi Har, do you recommend painting vaseline on the tree trunk to repell ants? if so do you paint it directly on the trunk or do you wrap the trunk with something and painting over it?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on August 27, 2017, 01:53:35 PM
Vaseline or Tanglefoot or other grease or undeluted oil directly on bark, kills the bark;  that is why I asked, after seeing the picture of apparently dead bark.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: pineislander on September 02, 2017, 08:03:07 AM
I am doing major corrective pruning on a 50 tree mango orchard. My question is about using micronutrient sprays and fish emulsion.
The trees are 6-8 years old and have not been pruned, fertilized sprayed or irrigated for years. They are a mix of compact growers and tall erect varieties. As a result of no pruning at all many trees have grown tall and wide with sparse inner canopies. Especially on the erect types I have had to reduce canopy size overall and open up the center by removing vertical leader branches and tipping back most every branch at least one to two internodes. I removed all dead/questionable wood and used best practices. The result is a reduction of leaf area from 50-90% depending on the tree.. I understand that with such drastic measures I can expect a greatly reduced yield next season, that is tolerable to me in order to get the grove under control.

I would like to do a general micronutrient spray as the trees recover and begin to flush. I also have available a homemade fish emulsion fertilizer, typically this is 5-1-1 NPK. I have a backpack mist blower to apply these.

Questions:
At what point in the new flush should I use the foliar micronutrient?
 
Will application at early flush be OK, or should I wait till later on as the flush hardens?

Air temps even at night still approach 77-80 degrees, should I apply foliars later afternoon or early morning?

Would fish emulsion be helpful on these trees at some point in regrowing the canopy?

What advice can you give about managing a regrowing canopy after renovation, I expect I will need to tip or remove the more vertical growth and inward growth, but should I continue tipping through multiple flushes heading towards winter?

Thanks for any help on this, there is a lot of info out on training young trees and maintenance pruning but scant on helping recover after major pruning.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on September 02, 2017, 11:01:09 PM
Either early morning or early evening.

Two or three dilute sprays during each new flush would be better than one concentrated spray.  All stages of new growth will be receptive to nutritional sprays, and even old growth benefits a little.

Thin growth so that all leaves receive some sun and breeze.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: samuelforest on October 09, 2017, 12:36:02 PM

(https://s1.postimg.cc/9hoibm9lff/20171009_123034.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9hoibm9lff/)

Hi everyone,

Can anyone identify what's happening to my mango tree? It's now flushing and it's a nam doc mai. Hard to see, but there's black spots on the new growth.It's curretly indoor under my 315w ceramic metal halide.

thanks
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on October 20, 2017, 10:37:33 PM
What deficiency may this be?


(https://s1.postimg.cc/2kylyolbq3/20171020_152548.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/2kylyolbq3/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/1zoycdt8az/20171020_152535.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/1zoycdt8az/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 21, 2017, 02:29:44 PM
Probably deficiencies of Copper and Zinc.

Please photograph again when the leaves harden up.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mango Stein on October 22, 2017, 04:52:18 AM

(https://s1.postimg.cc/5uowu6hr23/Kwan_manglets.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5uowu6hr23/)

My manglets on my Kwan (Burmese) are deformed - not sure why. They made it through the winter ok but now as if stung by fruit fly?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 22, 2017, 11:12:22 AM
Not fruit fly--- they are only interested in ripening fruit.

Possibly damage from Psylids or stink bugs, etc.

Possibly fungal infection, such as anthracnose.  Spray with Copper or other fungicide, at mild rates, to not harm the flowers.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: greenman62 on October 22, 2017, 12:36:13 PM

(https://s1.postimg.cc/5uowu6hr23/Kwan_manglets.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5uowu6hr23/)

My manglets on my Kwan (Burmese) are deformed - not sure why. They made it through the winter ok but now as if stung by fruit fly?

boron deficiency is known to cause mis-shapen fruits.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on October 26, 2017, 11:48:29 AM
Garden Gurus-- ?--I need help in ID whats going on with 2 Keitt and 1 VP tree I have- they seem to be putting out good new growth  but im concerned with these spots with halos on old growth--
(https://s1.postimg.cc/19bmptxbob/Untitled-1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/19bmptxbob/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/5hqtznmxbf/Untitled-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5hqtznmxbf/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/4wh6dcs9az/Untitled-3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4wh6dcs9az/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 26, 2017, 12:29:25 PM
Probably Mango Bacterial Black Spot

Spray with Copper and other anti-bacterials
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 26, 2017, 12:31:56 PM
GOZP, your picture of tender new growth probably shows Iron deficiency, and possibly the other deficiencies I already mentioned.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on October 26, 2017, 02:57:48 PM
Thanks Har--
whats the best way to treat Bacteria black spot--I have some -" Organocide Plant Doctor" systemic and also some CuPro 5000 61% copper- or is there something better
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FruitFreak on October 26, 2017, 04:41:24 PM
Probably Mango Bacterial Black Spot

Spray with Copper and other anti-bacterials

Does copper help with bacterial spot?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 27, 2017, 08:07:16 AM
Those products sound good.

These should reduce the spread of the infection, but aren't likely to kill what is already there.

If only a few leaves are affected, cut them off and put them in the city trash.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropheus76 on October 27, 2017, 08:35:48 AM
I will be getting deployed in the next few months for roughly 9 months including over the summer months(sadly I will miss any fruit next year). I have a neighbor who will be doing occasional walk throughs of the yard but no real work since he in his 70s. The very knowledgable guy I was going to have help just had another heart attack and his heart is only operating at 26% so he is out of the picture. The most I might be able to get out of him is some drenching and checking to see if whoever we get to mow didn't take out the sprinklers. The main trees I am concerned with are the mangos since they get most of the hate from pests out of all my trees followed by my citrus trees. My wife is useless in the yard and every biting insect out there makes a beeline for her and a mosquito bite on her last for a month so she isn't an option. So given that there will be minimum maintenance for my trees what can I do?

Any long term spinosad spray/drenching I can use? I only have 4 in ground mangos right now and 3 in large pots but they are in two different locations in the yard.

What suggestions? I figure anything good for mangos will probably apply to everything else.

Hoping to get a thick layer of pine bark nugget mulch around every tree in the yard before I leave to at least reduce weeds stress a bit. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on October 27, 2017, 12:57:31 PM
Those products sound good.

These should reduce the spread of the infection, but aren't likely to kill what is already there.

If only a few leaves are affected, cut them off and put them in the city trash.
Thanks Har!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on November 01, 2017, 04:51:43 PM

(https://s1.postimg.cc/3grusqzekr/20171101_131848.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3grusqzekr/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: marklee on November 01, 2017, 06:51:50 PM

(https://s1.postimg.cc/3grusqzekr/20171101_131848.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3grusqzekr/)
Hmm, never seen those spots, I'm getting something similar on my starfruit growth.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on November 01, 2017, 07:08:49 PM

(https://s1.postimg.cc/3grusqzekr/20171101_131848.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3grusqzekr/)
Hmm, never seen those spots, I'm getting something similar on my starfruit growth.

This happened when i foliar feed at 12 in the morning 😂😂😂

Lesson learnt..

I jst sprayed copper fungi
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomandan on November 02, 2017, 11:32:55 PM
I have a volunteer seedling tree that I have experimented on now and again.

It has looked terrible for a year or so, but my question is specifically about what appear to be scratch marks on the trunk, about 3 feet from the ground.
I would assume that it's some kind of physical damage, but don't know what would cause this.


(https://s1.postimg.cc/3d207v6e6j/sickly_seedling_trunk_Medium.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3d207v6e6j/)

The foliage looks bad in more ways than I can count.


(https://s1.postimg.cc/3derm0zecb/Sickly_seedling_Medium.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3derm0zecb/)

Can insects or disease cause the scratch marks?  Or should I assume that the neighborhood cats have settled on this tree as their scratching post?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 03, 2017, 07:41:31 AM
The trunk does look scratched by cats, etc.  If it seems to be on-going, applying stinky sprays to trunk and soil might stop it.  Spraying trunk with fungicides might give it a better chance to heal.

The leaves are deficient in pretty much everything, due to root starvation, from the downward movement of the sap through the phloem having been interrupted by the bark damage.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangomandan on November 05, 2017, 08:29:53 AM
Thanks, Har. I see some fresh scratches on an otherwise healthy tree, so time to take action.

Also, I enjoy learning a bit of the science involved, even if it doesn't stick in my brain.  :o


The trunk does look scratched by cats, etc.  If it seems to be on-going, applying stinky sprays to trunk and soil might stop it.  Spraying trunk with fungices might give it a better chance to heal.

The leaves are deficient in pretty much everything, due to root starvation, from the downward movement of the sap through the phloem having been interrupted by the bark damage.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: pineislander on November 06, 2017, 07:40:46 PM
Out of 50 mango trees this one has me puzzled. The tree is Juliette, and when I pruned it a few weeks ago it showed some signs of the same problem. I pruned off almost all leaves and it is recurring on the first flush. There are signs on the bottom of the leaves. Adjacent trees do not have any major problems, but i see a few instances of this happening on a few branches of one or two of them, but other leaves on them look normal. This Juliette tree, however is pretty much covered. I also noticed that the pruned branch tips of this tree are bleeding sap more than the others, enough that honeybees are collecting it for some use.

(https://s1.postimg.cc/7q852hsfwb/DSC01184_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7q852hsfwb/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/5yrxlrit0r/DSC01182_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5yrxlrit0r/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/797m696fqj/DSC01183_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/797m696fqj/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/1gffb4mhqj/DSC01185_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/1gffb4mhqj/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/6zab5fy0d7/DSC01186_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6zab5fy0d7/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/5t3rb0ebqz/DSC01187_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5t3rb0ebqz/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on November 08, 2017, 11:21:38 PM
Lack of iron for new growth leaves?

(https://s1.postimg.cc/65bs49a323/20171108_201829.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/65bs49a323/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 10, 2017, 08:58:14 AM
The green spots on the new growth look like what often happens from nutritional sprays.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 10, 2017, 09:36:05 AM
PineIslander, does that 'Juliette' tree have any trunk damage on that side of the tree, such as an imbedded strap?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on November 10, 2017, 10:45:01 AM
The green spots on the new growth look like what often happens from nutritional sprays.

These new leaves havent been sprayed.
I do wonder what this indicates.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on November 15, 2017, 08:02:53 PM

(https://s18.postimg.cc/xwmou3jad/20171115_153419.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/xwmou3jad/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 15, 2017, 09:42:27 PM
Very curious!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: SoCal on November 16, 2017, 05:18:18 PM
(https://s18.postimg.cc/50eaphbhh/5851483_A-3_DDC-41_EA-_B9_E5-0_E34_DF41_F0_E1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/50eaphbhh/)
Lemon zest

(https://s18.postimg.cc/ivcl7e0lh/59221721-535_D-4_D21-8012-_FAEA8_FF850_CB.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ivcl7e0lh/)
Maha Chanok

(https://s18.postimg.cc/d76agijed/5_CB4_B43_F-_DBEC-46_BF-_A257-_B5_BA9_B69290_A.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/d76agijed/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/sema1f8ud/9_C7_A79_A9-0601-4_AEA-_ADD1-_DA9587_F3_E2_AD.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/sema1f8ud/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/m0x6y6bo5/C868_A614-0_F55-4859-_B623-96_B0_AF0_A73_BB.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/m0x6y6bo5/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/e9ggz2hn9/F8_E37282-_B651-4328-_B632-_FC2_D36764_C18.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/e9ggz2hn9/)

Pictured are 2 of my mangoes: Lemon zest in the ground and Maha in a 20g pot.
LZ didn’t fruit this year and half of the new flushes don’t look healthy. The MC fruited but looks like it’s deficient on something. You guys have any ideas on what’s going on? Thanks.

-Allan
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 16, 2017, 06:29:36 PM
When the soil gets too dry, even for just one day, the hair roots die--- so very little of any of the micro-nutrients get absorbed--- until new hair roots grow.

Avoid any fertilizers that just have NPK.

I see severe Iron deficiency, Manganese and Zinc deficiencies, and probably Copper and Boron deficiencies.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: SoCal on November 16, 2017, 08:07:23 PM
When the soil gets too dry, even for just one day, the hair roots die--- so very little of any of the micro-nutrients get absorbed--- until new hair roots grow.

Avoid any fertilizers that just have NPK.

I see severe Iron deficiency, Manganese and Zinc deficiencies, and probably Copper and Boron deficiencies.
Thank you, any product recommendations?

-Allan
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FamilyJ on November 26, 2017, 08:13:51 AM
I currently use liquid copper fungicide ever month from the Home Depot, then from lowes i use Bayer advanced Fruit citrus & vegetable insect control every 6 months and Mango's haven't had a problem but that Citrus greening killed all citrus trees. To me it is easier to maintain Vs. fix the issue
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Jose Spain on November 26, 2017, 01:00:14 PM
Here I come with a strange (to me) case. Few months ago when I planted this Nam Doc Mai in soil, I discovered that ants and scale insects were coming into the very recent graft (a cleft graft). So I decided to cover the whole graft with this "healing paste" (I'm not sure how you calling it in English). Problem with insects ended there obviously, but this week I found that section swollen, so I took off the paste. This is what I found:

(https://s2.postimg.cc/bo1jhguwl/detalle.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/bo1jhguwl/)



(https://s2.postimg.cc/5zv8qllf9/20171125_140858.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5zv8qllf9/)

Any idea why this happened? Should I worry?

Thanks,


Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on January 07, 2018, 07:20:53 PM
Definitely odd looking
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on January 07, 2018, 07:22:36 PM
I'm noticing mango problems being posted in new threads everywhere, instead of in this dedicated thread.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fliptop on January 07, 2018, 09:21:17 PM
Here's a problem I encountered with a couple of mango trees purchased last April, the coveted Maha Chanok and Coconut Cream. I noticed amber sap coming out of them and the bark was splitting and almost flaking off. The trunk underneath the bark was dark, and the trees just kept looking worse and worse. I sawed and chopped into them and got this.

What caused it and is there any saving such a tree? Are there any recommended steps to preventing this from getting to my other mangoes? Everything is currently in pots until I am able to plant in the spring. Thanks!

(https://s10.postimg.cc/qeel8dhs5/MC_rot.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qeel8dhs5/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on January 08, 2018, 09:10:07 PM
When potted plants tip over, the trunks can be severely sunburned, killing the bark and cambium layer and underlying wood, all along one side.  Several months can go by before the dead tissue dries out and is noticed.

Another possibility is a systemic bacterial infection, such as Southern Bacterial Wilt, coming up from the soil, through the "veins."
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on January 08, 2018, 11:26:16 PM
What r ur thoughts?

(https://s17.postimg.cc/b5hup7rjf/20171223_161154.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b5hup7rjf/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/6jlqgyt6j/20180103_202106.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6jlqgyt6j/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on January 09, 2018, 08:23:05 PM
Painting the trunk with tar or glue or vaseline or Tanglefoot, et cetera, kills the bark and cambium layer.  Then the roots starve.  Then the top of the tree dies too.

To make a barrier against ants, etc., you must first wrap the trunk with some protective wrap that will not allow any of the above products to touch the trunk.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on January 09, 2018, 09:26:04 PM
Wow, this thread is a gold mine! Thanks, Har, for your valuable advice here!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on January 09, 2018, 09:45:14 PM
Yes good advice,  thanks Har
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fliptop on January 09, 2018, 10:01:06 PM
Yes indeed, thanks, Har!

You wrote:
'Another possibility is a systemic bacterial infection, such as Southern Bacterial Wilt, coming up from the soil, through the "veins."'

Is there treatment for that (SBW)? Any preventative measures I should take?

Should I put the soil from those affected trees in the trash? Reusing the soil would put other plants at risk, right?

Thanks again!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on January 10, 2018, 11:43:46 AM
Painting the trunk with tar or glue or vaseline or Tanglefoot, et cetera, kills the bark and cambium layer.  Then the roots starve.  Then the top of the tree dies too.

To make a barrier against ants, etc., you must first wrap the trunk with some protective wrap that will not allow any of the above products to touch the trunk.

So how do u brush out the pruning sealer besides removing with a knife? Any solutions  to remove?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on January 10, 2018, 10:02:11 PM
I don't use pruning sealer.

I suppose that pruning sealer is usually appled just to the wood of wide cuts, that is expected to die anyway, and not onto much live bark, and certainly not all the way around the trunk--- so that any injury is local, and not girdling, not tree killing.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: strkpr00 on January 26, 2018, 01:01:56 PM
I think the interior damage might of been from a recent hurricane. Todays high winds in Broward broke it off. Should I cut the the other half now or wait till after it fruits? It is a Hatcher and about 8 years old.
(https://s13.postimg.cc/x7j3x2okz/20180126_124140.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/x7j3x2okz/)

(https://s13.postimg.cc/ef78tin1v/20180126_123328.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ef78tin1v/)

(https://s13.postimg.cc/7q0pcz6pf/20180126_123337.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7q0pcz6pf/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on January 26, 2018, 09:40:49 PM
I would definitely wait until post harvest. At that point, you have two options:

 - You could leave it. It's not ideal, but the wound will heal over in a year or two. The tree will form a barrier around the dead portion internally, but it wouldn't impact tree health. Personally, I would probably leave it unless cutting it would not leave the canopy ugly or significantly imbalanced.

 - If you decide to cut it, you would take it back to the crotch where the branch attaches to the trunk

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: BahamaDan on January 26, 2018, 10:51:47 PM
Good day, adding this post to this thread instead of creating a new one since my query seems to fall under the heading. I did some grafts of mature mango scions onto a seedling mango a week or two ago since it's a couple years old but has never flowered, and I was checking them a couple days ago. The ones I have checked so far haven't taken, but more importantly I noticed what appears to be some sort of dieback on the leaves. It's affecting a fairly significant number of leaves too, has anyone had anything that looked like this?

(https://s13.postimg.cc/6s7rr7o7n/photo_2018-01-26_22-39-28.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6s7rr7o7n/)

I should mention that the dieback has been there for a while probably, I just never actually looked at the leaves specifically so it didn't come to mind. The leaf parts that haven't died still seem healthy, so not sure what's causing the partial dieback. No sooty mold or other fungal problems on the tree that I'm aware of, although there's an older established fruiting mango about 15-20 feet away that doesn't have the leaf partial dieback issue but does have some sooty mold on a couple lower branches. That one seems to be growing fine overall though and is presently flowering.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: strkpr00 on January 27, 2018, 10:19:58 AM
i cut the fallen branch side to see how far it traveled and the dead wood was minimal. I will leave it till post fruiting for the big trim and canopy reduction as it getting large.

I would definitely wait until post harvest. At that point, you have two options:

 - You could leave it. It's not ideal, but the wound will heal over in a year or two. The tree will form a barrier around the dead portion internally, but it wouldn't impact tree health. Personally, I would probably leave it unless cutting it would not leave the canopy ugly or significantly imbalanced.

 - If you decide to cut it, you would take it back to the crotch where the branch attaches to the trunk
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: strkpr00 on January 27, 2018, 10:42:49 AM
Not too deep.

(https://s13.postimg.cc/qg2so14eb/20180127_103405.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qg2so14eb/)

(https://s13.postimg.cc/veqb2las3/20180127_103315.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/veqb2las3/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on January 27, 2018, 12:23:17 PM
Yep. If you leave that branch to heal over and come back in 5 years and cut it open, you'll see a dark colored core in the center of the branch, perhaps 1/2 inch in diameter. This is how trees protect themselves, by walling off the section that is at risk for infection. But for all practical purposes, it won't harm the tree's health.

Not too deep.

(https://s13.postimg.cc/qg2so14eb/20180127_103405.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qg2so14eb/)

(https://s13.postimg.cc/veqb2las3/20180127_103315.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/veqb2las3/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on January 27, 2018, 03:31:58 PM
BahamaDan, I see very green grass under the tree, right up to the trunk!

Check for WeedEater damge to the trunk.
Check to see if this small tree is a dog's habitual place to pee.
Check for high-nitrogen fertilizer's having been applied to the grass.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: BahamaDan on January 29, 2018, 05:10:46 AM
BahamaDan, I see very green grass under the tree, right up to the trunk!

Check for WeedEater damge to the trunk.
Check to see if this small tree is a dog's habitual place to pee.
Check for high-nitrogen fertilizer's having been applied to the grass.

Guanabanus, you're right about the grass. I thought it was clover so I left it but upon recent examination it appears to actually be Oxalis.

We don't own any weedeaters, we just mow around the perimeter of the trunk.
We have no dogs either, we do have an outside cat though.
We also don't apply any fertilizer to our plants (bad I know lol).
Any other possible explanations for the partial dieback?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on January 29, 2018, 02:44:04 PM
Established Cogshall, with what I assume is a bad fungal problem.  I've sprayed the tree twice in the past two weeks with Southern Ag Liquid Copper Fungicide, using the recommended dosage of 4 teaspoons/gal.  The tree is also starting to send up pannicles.  The photos are about a week after the second treatment.  I'm not seeing much improvement.
A Pickering, not too far removed from the Cogshall, has no fungus.
What am I looking at and how best to eradicate it?

(https://s13.postimg.cc/ltko96xg3/20180129_135657_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ltko96xg3/)

(https://s13.postimg.cc/4gaduazk3/20180129_135646.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4gaduazk3/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: strkpr00 on January 30, 2018, 06:40:47 PM
Once the fungus situation is resolved I think you have to wait for a new flush of leaves as the damage is done and a leaf cannot repair itself.
It sure works that way with orchids.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on January 30, 2018, 10:12:51 PM
Deficiency of Boron is a common cause of dieback.  Other deficiencies can also contribute to dieback.  So can diseases.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mango Stein on February 01, 2018, 04:08:58 AM
Mango splitting problem is continuing for me. I'm fairly sure watering is not the issue. I've noticed that the panicle is turning black (necrotizing?) from the fruit upwards. It must be connected to the problem somehow.
(https://s18.postimg.cc/pz1yx4qcl/mango_splitting.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pz1yx4qcl/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 01, 2018, 09:10:59 AM
That is an extremely thin mango trunk.  The composter right next to it is probably providing too much Nitrogen.

Have you tested the soil?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on February 01, 2018, 10:41:34 AM
It's hard to see in the photo, but that long stem is not the trunk. It's an ultra-long stem that is holding a mango :-).
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 02, 2018, 03:17:33 AM
sho nuf
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: johnb51 on February 02, 2018, 08:42:51 AM
OK, please explain MBBS and "the rot," and how it's going to affect mango growing in South Florida going forward.  Are we going to lose mangos like we lost citrus???
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on February 02, 2018, 11:06:44 AM
I doubt it. It will probably just be another pest that growers will have to deal with -- using bactericides, environmental modifications, cultivar selection, etc.

OK, please explain MBBS and "the rot," and how it's going to affect mango growing in South Florida going forward.  Are we going to lose mangos like we lost citrus???
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: PltdWorld on February 02, 2018, 12:05:47 PM
I've read through this thread and haven't seen anything that fits... so, here goes... my Haden has been in the ground for approx 10 years and has struggled the whole time.  It's starting to look decent, so I was planning on taking some scions and grafting to my Manila.   When clipping leaves, I found this...


(https://s18.postimg.cc/9vzlroyxh/IMG_4217.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9vzlroyxh/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/8tpf95ntx/IMG_4218.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8tpf95ntx/)

They look like legless/headless ticks (same size and color).  They have a hard shell with yellow/orange contents.  Any idea what this is?  How harmful is it to the tree?

Thanks
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Dangermouse01 on February 02, 2018, 01:25:44 PM
I've read through this thread and haven't seen anything that fits... so, here goes... my Haden has been in the ground for approx 10 years and has struggled the whole time.  It's starting to look decent, so I was planning on taking some scions and grafting to my Manila.   When clipping leaves, I found this...


(https://s18.postimg.cc/9vzlroyxh/IMG_4217.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9vzlroyxh/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/8tpf95ntx/IMG_4218.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8tpf95ntx/)

They look like legless/headless ticks (same size and color).  They have a hard shell with yellow/orange contents.  Any idea what this is?  How harmful is it to the tree?

Thanks

Looks like katydid eggs.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: PltdWorld on February 02, 2018, 01:41:19 PM
Looks like katydid eggs.

Thanks!  Surprised this is the first time I've seen their eggs - we have lots of grasshoppers.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on February 09, 2018, 03:59:33 PM
I wonder what killed my corriente seedling?

I uploaded a photo of the main trunk and its drying up


(https://s17.postimg.cc/5sfvi6eez/20180209_121250.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5sfvi6eez/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/w0r07jj2z/20180209_121255.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/w0r07jj2z/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 10, 2018, 12:37:49 PM
Have you tried scratching the trunk, to see if there is green right under the papery outer bark?

Sometimes, freeze damage is only a few inches above the ground.

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on February 10, 2018, 09:47:05 PM
Have you tried scratching the trunk, to see if there is green right under the papery outer bark?

Sometimes, freeze damage is only a few inches above the ground.

the bottom trunk is all green, however an estimate of a inch is dried up...

The rest of my my mangoes are fine.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FruitFreak on February 16, 2018, 11:31:25 AM
While pruning my Angie tree I noticed numerous areas with decay.  Upon further inspection it appears the tree has been suffering and is on the decline.  When I cleaned off the affected areas ants came pouring out (never good).  It looks like every joint has some sort of splitting or decay.  The sad thing is the new growths and foliage looks perfectly healthy but I know inside the tree is dead/dying.  My thought is to wait until the next flush and top the tree below the bottom branch and start from scratch (if the disease isn't terminal).  In the meantime I will completely soak the rootball in case there are any airpockets in the soil.  The tree had been potted for a long time and almost died from a drought.

Please let me know if you think this is a good approach or if I should just top it now and roll the dice...?  Either way im thinking it has to be topped considering the amount of already dead material inside the tree but maybe im wrong.

(https://s17.postimg.cc/5eo8gthwb/IMG_5150.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5eo8gthwb/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/jl3zc20h7/IMG_5152.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jl3zc20h7/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/mf74pixij/IMG_5153.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/mf74pixij/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/9nsyj0vgb/IMG_5156.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9nsyj0vgb/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/6tpt5k64r/IMG_5157.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6tpt5k64r/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/nu8pe9e17/IMG_5158.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nu8pe9e17/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/6gyezeqfv/IMG_5159.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6gyezeqfv/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/9nsyj00l7/IMG_5160.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/9nsyj00l7/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 16, 2018, 02:42:23 PM
Was mulch mounded up the trunk for protection during a cold spell?  Long-term, that could kill the tree.

Drenching with Alliette or Flanker, or with Plant Doctor or similar, would probably help a lot.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FruitFreak on February 16, 2018, 04:22:16 PM
Was mulch mounded up the trunk for protection during a cold spell?  Long-term, that could kill the tree.

Drenching with Alliette or Flanker, or with Plant Doctor or similar, would probably help a lot.

Are those certified organic?  In your opinion with all the internal dead areas, does it make sense just to sever and drench with something?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FruitFreak on February 16, 2018, 08:45:59 PM
Was mulch mounded up the trunk for protection during a cold spell?  Long-term, that could kill the tree.

Drenching with Alliette or Flanker, or with Plant Doctor or similar, would probably help a lot.

To answer you question Har, No, no mulch was mounded.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 16, 2018, 09:06:14 PM
I can see mulch touching the trunk.  Mulch touching trunks, often, during rainy weather or trunk-wetting irrigation, encourages trunk circling roots, and sometimes infections in the bark.

The products I mentioned are not "organic."  If your tree is not going to be productive because it is dying, certification for organic production is mute.  If you save the tree, the contamination will be broken down or diluted greatly by the time the tree does produce, 2-3 years later.  And if the tree was produced by any of the major mango tree production nurseries, it wasn't organicaly produced.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on February 18, 2018, 11:48:47 AM
I've got a young Carie  3 years old in ground from a 3 gallon pot that have dropped most of the fruit only about 5 left, after a full bloom , it had a good initial fruit set and got the size of peas to marbles size. It's getting watered 2x a week.I hit it with Cu-Pro 500 (62% copper) just as the first flowers starting coming out about a month ago.
Same thing on a Val-Carie.
I'm worried  now about my NM and Keitt trees..as there loaded with pea size fruit now...what to do to prevent more  loss..
(https://s17.postimg.cc/4e35j31vv/20180218_110644.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4e35j31vv/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/i7ri85x23/20180218_110801.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/i7ri85x23/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/oy7zhr4u3/20180218_110730.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/oy7zhr4u3/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/ilsu7fh23/20180216_180130.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ilsu7fh23/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: zands on February 18, 2018, 12:07:19 PM
I've got a young Carie  3 years old in ground from a 3 gallon pot that have dropped most of the fruit only about 5 left, after a full bloom , it had a good initial fruit set and got the size of peas to marbles size. It's getting watered 2x a week.I hit it with Cu-Pro 500 (62% copper) just as the first flowers starting coming out about a month ago.
Same thing on a Val-Carie.
I'm worried  now about my NM and Keitt trees..as there loaded with pea size fruit now...what to do to prevent more  loss..

#1 - Carrie fruit is delicious as any new Zill for me. So it was worth waiting for my Carrie tree to get older
#2 - Planted from a 3 gallon pot- My Carrie tree's first years were disappointing. I had profuse blooms and bb size fruits that never went anywhere.
#3-  In year five my Carrie tree took off as far as production and has been a good producer since then.

So you might have to wait until year five. Meanwhile you can buy Carrie fruits at Excalibur or Tropical Acres that will remind you that Carrie is worth waiting for.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 18, 2018, 12:22:58 PM
It is good that you keep the soil moist when pea-sized fruits are on.

Boron-deficiency is also a cause of recent fruit-sets dropping.  Be careful to not over-do it when correcting.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on February 19, 2018, 04:32:47 AM
Thanks Zands and Har that helps alot, I appreciate it
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on February 19, 2018, 12:43:55 PM
There is another thread here that discusses carrie's tendency to have poor fruit set when young. My tree took 6 to 8 years before it really started to produce strong crops on a consistent basis.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on February 21, 2018, 05:59:59 PM
Thanks Jeff, I've grown a few Carries but that was 15 years ago at my last place, and my memory is not what it used to be.....so I'm going to wait on them and see how it goes
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on February 22, 2018, 09:22:18 AM
The products I mentioned are not "organic."  If your tree is not going to be productive because it is dying, certification for organic production is mute.

Great point Har.  Sometimes our aspirations take over common botanical sense resulting in financial losses.  It doesn't have to be.

Marley, do and use whatever you can to save the tree....and keep it to yourself.   ;)  You could be applying Magnabon CS2005 both as a foliar spray and soil drench.  Like I said before it is OMRI certified organic FWIW.

Case in point.  You know I got hit with 18F.  Well guess what, my Reed avocado (a frost IN-tolerant pure Guatemelan race) is pushing green foliage all over the place.  All my citrus is green and everyone who grows citrus knows key lime is not hardy.  Not only is the key lime tree alive but the grafts (tall branches now) of orange, persian lime and lemon on it are alive.  Why?  I think in part because I staved off root and other tissue rot thanks to a foliar spray of copper 2 days before the freeze hit and then 2 days after the freeze I applied a strong soil drench of copper, this time Phyton 35, same copper chemisty.  I'll worry about the small stuff like soil microbial health later.  Right now my focus is on saving my stock at ANY cost.

Yes, get the mulch off the tree.  That trunks needs air circulation.

Good luck amigo!

Mark
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on February 22, 2018, 09:25:08 AM
Boron-deficiency is also a cause of recent fruit-sets dropping.  Be careful to not over-do it when correcting.

Yep, and too often over looked.  I apply Solubor to all my fruiting greenhouse trees especially avocados and to my vinifera vineyard.  Easy does it as too much and it's toxic.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 22, 2018, 03:38:19 PM
quotes from Mark in Texas:
I staved off root and other tissue rot thanks to a foliar spray of copper 2 days before the tree hit and then 2 days after the freeze I applied a strong soil drench of copper, this time Phyton 35, same copper chemisty.  I'll worry about the small stuff like soil microbial health later.  Right now my focus is on saving my stock at ANY cost.

You could be applying Magnabon CS2005 both as a foliar spray and soil drench.  Like I said before it is OMRI certified organic FWIW.

I am very interested to know what rate of either product per gallon of water; and how many square feet of ground covered by each gallon of mix, for drenching mangos.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on February 22, 2018, 05:17:38 PM
I am very interested to know what rate of either product per gallon of water; and how many square feet of ground covered by each gallon of mix, for drenching mangos.

Have to check my greenhouse journal for the soil drench amount.  For foliar 1.5 - 2 tsp. per gallon of either product works.  Phyton is kinda syrupy suggesting it has a surfactant.  I add about 1 tsp. and no more of a non-ionic surfactant to Magnabon CS2005.   Pots are 55 gal., about 33" diameter, bottomless so the trees root into native soil.  Labels have rates for all kinds of apps.

BTW, I really screwed up on my first application with this chemistry by miss reading the Phyton label and applied 10X the recommended rate.  Was shocked to find minor leaf burn on the avocados and that was mainly to younger tender foliage.  Both companies have excellent tech help.   Recommend a talk with Frank Miele at Phyton.  Tell him I sent you.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 22, 2018, 10:54:42 PM
Thank you, sir.

The only drench rate I found when I re-read the CS2005 label was for apple. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on February 23, 2018, 08:56:56 AM
Thank you, sir.

The only drench rate I found when I re-read the CS2005 label was for apple.


Most welcome.  Magnabon is labeled for spraying mangos as well as most of our tropical fruits. http://www.magnabon.com/userfiles/file/cs2005label.pdf (http://www.magnabon.com/userfiles/file/cs2005label.pdf)

Page 5 has soil drench rates but not for fruits.  I'd talk to one of their techs if I were you.  I also noted that cuttings can be sprayed and dipped which is what I'll do with the cherimoya cuttings.  https://phytoncorp.com/wp-content/downloads/phyton35specimen.pdf (https://phytoncorp.com/wp-content/downloads/phyton35specimen.pdf)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Empoweredandfree on February 25, 2018, 03:36:03 PM
My new mango I had shipped has a dark brown portion on the main stem while the rest remains lime green. Anything to be concerned about?
(https://s13.postimg.cc/5opq0b9j7/IMG_1074.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5opq0b9j7/)

(https://s13.postimg.cc/8isvdrjf7/IMG_1075.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8isvdrjf7/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on February 25, 2018, 03:38:33 PM
Too blurry.   Please also show the lower portion of the trunk.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on February 26, 2018, 08:44:42 AM
My new mango I had shipped has a dark brown portion on the main stem while the rest remains lime green. Anything to be concerned about?
(https://s13.postimg.cc/5opq0b9j7/IMG_1074.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5opq0b9j7/)

(https://s13.postimg.cc/8isvdrjf7/IMG_1075.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8isvdrjf7/)

Looks like phomopsis and yes, could be a big problem is it spreads.  You could spray it with a broad spectrum fungicide and/or cut below the damage.  If it's mechanical damage due to shipping don't worry about it.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: pineislander on March 01, 2018, 06:13:00 PM
Out of 50 mango trees this one has me puzzled. The tree is Juliette, and when I pruned it a few weeks ago it showed some signs of the same problem. I pruned off almost all leaves and it is recurring on the first flush. There are signs on the bottom of the leaves. Adjacent trees do not have any major problems, but i see a few instances of this happening on a few branches of one or two of them, but other leaves on them look normal. This Juliette tree, however is pretty much covered. I also noticed that the pruned branch tips of this tree are bleeding sap more than the others, enough that honeybees are collecting it for some use.

(https://s1.postimg.cc/7q852hsfwb/DSC01184_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/7q852hsfwb/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/5yrxlrit0r/DSC01182_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5yrxlrit0r/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/797m696fqj/DSC01183_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/797m696fqj/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/1gffb4mhqj/DSC01185_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/1gffb4mhqj/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/6zab5fy0d7/DSC01186_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6zab5fy0d7/)

(https://s1.postimg.cc/5t3rb0ebqz/DSC01187_1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5t3rb0ebqz/)
I'm happy to show you that at this point the tree has flushed strongly with no signs of the previous problem. Since I posted the original pictures I did a foliar spray with fish emulsion and one application of a broad spectrum micronutrient (Diamond R Ultra-Rx) and apply gypsum. Will see how it goes through the summer but is looking very good now.

(https://s17.postimg.cc/os410fo23/DSC01257.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/os410fo23/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on March 01, 2018, 06:21:32 PM
Thank you, sir.

The only drench rate I found when I re-read the CS2005 label was for apple.

Sorry it took so long Har but on the soil drench I used 9 oz./32 gals. water which is the same rate as foliar spray 1.5 tsp to 2 tsp. per gallon.  Magnabon or Phyton, same chemistry, same AI (active ingredient).
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 02, 2018, 07:47:56 AM
Thank you.  I'll try to get permission to do that on several trees.  I don't have mango trees myself.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on March 02, 2018, 08:32:44 AM
Thank you.  I'll try to get permission to do that on several trees.  I don't have mango trees myself.

Welcome and good luck.

Just a note about cold hardiness.  Texas has 1,000's of fruit growers, many are growing citrus and mango outdoors and what always nails us is the sudden and wide swings in temps during the winter which is typical of Texas weather.  We could be having 78F one day, have an Arctic front blow thru and by morning have 24F.  The tree hasn't had time to shut down, to acclimate.

Which brings me to my next point of why maybe some of my very frost intolerant trees like my key lime, Lemon Zest, Reed and Gwen avocados made it, are starting to push.  For days our outside ambient temps were in the 20's. The day of the big 18F my greenhouse temps were around 35-37F being the heater's day setpoint is 35F.  This acclimated the trees such that the short hit they took at 18F didn't nail all of them!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Empoweredandfree on March 05, 2018, 07:58:55 PM
My new mango I had shipped has a dark brown portion on the main stem while the rest remains lime green. Anything to be concerned about?
(https://s13.postimg.cc/5opq0b9j7/IMG_1074.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/5opq0b9j7/)

(https://s13.postimg.cc/8isvdrjf7/IMG_1075.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8isvdrjf7/)

Looks like phomopsis and yes, could be a big problem is it spreads.  You could spray it with a broad spectrum fungicide and/or cut below the damage.  If it's mechanical damage due to shipping don't worry about it.

Thanks Mark.....I gave it a copper spray for now, doesn't appear to have gotten worse. Everything I ordered from this place came looking like sh*t.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on March 06, 2018, 08:14:07 AM
Everything I ordered from this place came looking like sh*t.

And who would that be?  I need to start all over.  Guess I've been in a state of denial, hoping for a miracle, but yesterday I confirmed all my mango trees are toast.

I've had great luck with Pine Island nursery stock.  My intent is to stub whatever I buy above the first node and graft to the shoots that arise.  Did that last year and had a beautiful cocktail tree of 4 Zill varieties on 8 branches.   

(https://s10.postimg.cc/a1w8byjg5/Cocktail_Mango_Oct25.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/a1w8byjg5/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: WGphil on March 06, 2018, 10:19:32 AM
That’s how I lost my Sunburst tangerine grove. 

High temps for weeks and then 22 for mid day temps and then back to warm again. All tangerines and their Orlando Tangelo pollinators a total loss. 

8o’s had more freezes than usual. 



Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Empoweredandfree on March 06, 2018, 05:27:18 PM
Everything I ordered from this place came looking like sh*t.

And who would that be?  I need to start all over.  Guess I've been in a state of denial, hoping for a miracle, but yesterday I confirmed all my mango trees are toast.

I've had great luck with Pine Island nursery stock.  My intent is to stub whatever I buy above the first node and graft to the shoots that arise.  Did that last year and had a beautiful cocktail tree of 4 Zill varieties on 8 branches.   

(https://s10.postimg.cc/a1w8byjg5/Cocktail_Mango_Oct25.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/a1w8byjg5/)

 My local nursery gets stuff from Pine Island and it usually always looks great (except Lychees). PlantOgram always sends awesome trees too. I won't publicly hurt someones business but I'll PM you the name.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on March 07, 2018, 07:46:36 AM
My local nursery gets stuff from Pine Island and it usually always looks great (except Lychees). PlantOgram always sends awesome trees too. I won't publicly hurt someones business but I'll PM you the name.

You're not hurting Top Tropicals, they are doing it to themselves.  There has been plenty of complaints about those bunch of garden carnies.  They sold me a crap Nishikawa avocado and didn't make good on it.  And the way they misrepresent their stock, mis-label, I doubt if I even received the variety I ordered!

https://davesgarden.com/products/gwd/c/2785/0/

There is no excuse for this.  Growquest was another shyster.  Think they finally put him (Chris) in jail where he belongs.   Word is he's busy watering the warden's daisies..... always maintaining an upright position.  ;D

84 positives
12 neutrals
44 negatives
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Empoweredandfree on March 07, 2018, 03:44:50 PM
My local nursery gets stuff from Pine Island and it usually always looks great (except Lychees). PlantOgram always sends awesome trees too. I won't publicly hurt someones business but I'll PM you the name.

You're not hurting Top Tropicals, they are doing it to themselves.  There has been plenty of complaints about those bunch of garden carnies.  They sold me a crap Nishikawa avocado and didn't make good on it.  And the way they misrepresent their stock, mis-label, I doubt if I even received the variety I ordered!

https://davesgarden.com/products/gwd/c/2785/0/


 A lot of scammers in Florida on e-bay too.

Mark, how do you like the air pots?

There is no excuse for this.  Growquest was another shyster.  Think they finally put him (Chris) in jail where he belongs.   Word is he's busy watering the warden's daisies..... always maintaining an upright position.  ;D

84 positives
12 neutrals
44 negatives
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on March 08, 2018, 09:20:37 AM
Been using root pruning products for many years.  Depends on my plans.  Today I'll be expanding some (adding panels) in the greenhouse and adding a couple of new 55 gal. ones using a new roll of RootBuilder I got in.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Empoweredandfree on March 08, 2018, 06:34:37 PM
Been using root pruning products for many years.  Depends on my plans.  Today I'll be expanding some (adding panels) in the greenhouse and adding a couple of new 55 gal. ones using a new roll of RootBuilder I got in.

 I just invested in some "air" pots this year. I like the look of them as opposed to the fabric pots that don't like all that much for various reasons.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: pineislander on March 10, 2018, 08:48:48 PM
Har, on another thread you mentioned using calcium, silicon, and copper. I'm amending with gypsum, and not just for mangoes, on my whole property. I'm using a good micronutrient supplement in soil and foliar to cover copper.

I've been looking at fertilizing with silicon. Most are silicic acid or potassium silicates. There could be others I don't know about. I have spread bamboo stalk & leaf mulch and know that grass and rice hulls contain lots of silicon but don't have a ready source yet for those.
I am looking at crab shell byproducts. I'd love to hear about your experience using silicon fertilizers.

Can you please expound on silicon's role in mangoes, and how to use it to improve disease resistance, our productivity and crop quality?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on March 11, 2018, 08:29:44 AM
Here's another one for you Har...
I've got 2 Keitt trees 20 feet apart. that are 3 years old from a 15 gallon
And are loaded with fruit, some of the fruit looks like this
I've been hitting it with 62% copper and Plant Doctor
Should I pick all these off and throw in trash?
Btw..I look forward to your talk next month at the RFC

(https://s18.postimg.cc/8u9i4rl1x/20180311_081628.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8u9i4rl1x/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/rmld8dzgl/20180311_081431.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rmld8dzgl/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on March 11, 2018, 08:38:42 AM
A few weeks ago I made a post about my Carrie tree dropping all its fruit ..and Har mentioned a lack of Boron could be the cause...so I sprayed the tree with Boron the next day..and copper 2xs since then as luck would have the whole bloomed again and this time looks like a great crop staying on the tree so far over 100 the size of marbles. ....you can see 4 that held from the first bloom..thanks Har and everyone eles for the good advice
(https://s18.postimg.cc/wmneu4rx1/20180311_081735.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/wmneu4rx1/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on March 11, 2018, 09:18:51 AM
Can you please expound on silicon's role in mangoes, and how to use it to improve disease resistance, our productivity and crop quality?

Silicon would be considered one of those beneficial rather than essential elements.  Works on some crops, but not on most.  I bought Dyna-Gro's Pro-tek but see no real world value on the crops I've sprayed with when it comes to disease pressures.

You know I sing the praises of Keyplex 350DP.  Here's a good read:

Zinc and silicon help increase the effectiveness of mechanical barriers, making it difficult for sucking insects to penetrate the outer walls; this in turn minimizes the spread of disease. Copper is an important catalyst for the chemical reactions that take place within plant cells and it can neutralize the damaging effects of oxygen radicals and hydrogen peroxide to healthy plant tissue.

https://www.keyplex.com/knowledge-base/pest-management/the-role-of-plant-nutrition-in-plant-resistance/ (https://www.keyplex.com/knowledge-base/pest-management/the-role-of-plant-nutrition-in-plant-resistance/)

If you're not careful and start believing everything you read, especially if it comes from a site or vendor who stands to profit from it, you become a bumbling idiot staring at labels, talking to the bottles.  I hate when that happens.  ;D

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on March 11, 2018, 10:09:14 AM
Here's another one for you Har...
I've got 2 Keitt trees 20 feet apart. that are 3 years old from a 15 gallon
And are loaded with fruit, some of the fruit looks like this
I've been hitting it with 62% copper and Plant Doctor
Should I pick all these off and throw in trash?
Btw..I look forward to your talk next month at the RFC

(https://s18.postimg.cc/8u9i4rl1x/20180311_081628.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8u9i4rl1x/)

(https://s18.postimg.cc/rmld8dzgl/20180311_081431.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rmld8dzgl/)

That’s scab. Same treatment as anthracnose, copper and something else. I don’t know if Plant Doctor will do much for it though.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 11, 2018, 02:34:39 PM
PineIslander,
another natural source of available Silicates is Australian Pine mulch.  The phytoliths of Silicates in the wood, along with a lot of resin, are what destroy lumber-mill saws, so operators don't want it.

Your sandy ground is mostly Silicates, un-available until in contact with acids, such as from decaying vegetation, or such as from acid-forming fertilizers, sulfates.

Despite lack of essentiality of Silicon for growing inside laboratories--- where there is no wind, growing Grass-Family crops in Silicon-deficient conditions is un-profitable.   Silicate fertilizers, or acid applications to soil can make a huge difference for Sugar-Cane and Rice, and other grains, and also in Cucurbits and Potatoes.  It can be a major nutrient--- a structural nutrient.

With broad-leaf trees, Silicon is apparently a micro-nutrient, or even a trace nutrient.  In most cases it has not been studied at all.

Potassium Silicate is not compatible with many (most?) other spray ingredients--- most certainly not compatible with any ingredients requiring a notably acidic mix.  In hindsight, it appears that many of my spray mixes were useless from the moment of mixing--- it is a clear substance, so my jar tests didn't always show a visible problem.

My attempts failed to show any benefit from using Dyna-Gro Pro-TeKt liquid fertilizer on mango, probably mostly due to the above-mentioned tank-mix incompatibilities, and perhaps because my jug has been sitting around in my garage for 20 years!

I will be re-visiting the matter.

I attended a continuing education class for commercial grove spraying, last summer, where Dr. Jonathon Crane handed out an Aug 2017 "Updated list of fungicides labeled for Florida mango production."  It listed Potassium silicate (not classified in any fungicide group), brand name Sil-Matrix, allowed for organic production, "disease depressant."

Field trials in the last four years, in New Zealand and in California, have shown impressive results in eradicative / curative spray mixes on grapes already infested with powdery mildew.  [The powdery mildews of grapes and mangos both tend to be described as "Oidium spp."  The powdery mildews of most other crops are not at all closely related.]




Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 11, 2018, 02:43:26 PM
Capt Ram,
Do you actually mix Copper with Plant Doctor?  Which Copper product?

I double-checked the Plant Doctor label, and sure enough, it does not seem to advise against use with Copper, perhaps because of Plant Doctor's near-neutral ph.  Ph 6.8-7.2.

[Most products containing Phosphites are very acidic and labels forbid mixing with copper, or spraying within 14 days either way.]
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on March 11, 2018, 04:09:08 PM
No Har-- Im using one for about 10 days then the other...Im not mixing them--Im using CuPro 5000-- 62% copper--
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on March 11, 2018, 04:12:57 PM
not sure how to delete this==
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on March 11, 2018, 04:15:30 PM
Here's another one for you Har...
I've got 2 Keitt trees 20 feet apart. that are 3 years old from a 15 gallon
And are loaded with fruit, some of the fruit looks like this
I've been hitting it with 62% copper and Plant Doctor
Should I pick all these off and throw in trash?
Btw..I look forward to your talk next month at the RFC

(https://s18.postimg.cc/8u9i4rl1x/20180311_081628.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/8u9i4rl1x/) Thanks Alex-- I will contune to keep the copper up for a while

(https://s18.postimg.cc/rmld8dzgl/20180311_081431.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rmld8dzgl/)

That’s scab. Same treatment as copper. I don’t know if Plant Doctor will do much for it though.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: pineislander on March 11, 2018, 04:49:42 PM
PineIslander,
another natural source of available Silicates is Australian Pine mulch.  The phytoliths of Silicates in the wood, along with a lot of resin, are what destroy lumber-mill saws, so operators don't want it.
Good. There is plenty of Aus pine in the hurricane debris mulch I'm using so that's a plus. I'll be looking into silicates for powdery mildew but didn't see it this year on fruits, it was around in my area on a few things near Thanksgiving but long before mango flowering.
I did find this comparison of silicate sources.
https://customhydronutrients.com/comparison-of-plant-available-silicon-in-fertilizer-sources-ezp-2.html
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on March 12, 2018, 08:41:13 AM
This new vendor (for me) has some great prices.  Am working up a cart with to include a hard to find Mycho called VAM and getting Peter's S.T.E.M.   They have silicates.
https://customhydronutrients.com/dry-water-soluble-hydroponic-fertilizers-c-1.html?zenid=85019da4cf9ab216ff5e698024e52bba
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on March 14, 2018, 09:39:33 AM
Should I pick any scab affected mangos off the tree while there small?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 14, 2018, 09:58:51 PM
Your sprays are probably working well enough to prevent spreading.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on March 15, 2018, 03:44:33 AM
Ok thanks Har
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Tropheus76 on March 15, 2018, 09:05:25 AM
I am going out of town for about 8 months during the warm/hot season. Last year on my mangoes we had bad weevil infestations as the primary bad guy affecting mine and my neighbor's mangoes and a few other trees. Hoping this continually cold weather will kill a bunch of those off, still 33 in the morning here in east Orlando. My in ground mangoes are recovering from the hard freezes of this year and have only recently sprouted new leaves mostly from the trunks. What kind of long term root drench can I use before I leave to kill off any weevils in the ground? Preferably something I can get off amazon or ebay.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on March 16, 2018, 12:50:59 PM
Any idea what this necrotic may be?

(https://s17.postimg.cc/qerjegsvv/20180315_233020.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/qerjegsvv/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/nkoe10izv/20180315_233037.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/nkoe10izv/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on March 16, 2018, 05:09:13 PM
I suspect leafhopper/ sharpshooter or brown stink bug that got into this branch.


(https://s17.postimg.cc/b1g8aeljv/20180316_102036.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b1g8aeljv/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/g03qoxhmz/20180316_103400.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/g03qoxhmz/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/x0mmxks3f/20180316_110532.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/x0mmxks3f/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FreshOne on March 16, 2018, 10:39:04 PM
I suspect leafhopper/ sharpshooter or brown stink bug that got into this branch.


(https://s17.postimg.cc/b1g8aeljv/20180316_102036.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/b1g8aeljv/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/g03qoxhmz/20180316_103400.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/g03qoxhmz/)

(https://s17.postimg.cc/x0mmxks3f/20180316_110532.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/x0mmxks3f/)

why are the lower trunk white? whitewash?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: gozp on March 16, 2018, 11:48:32 PM
Yessir, against rodents...
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 17, 2018, 07:55:34 AM
Gozp,

I have no idea.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: weiss613 on March 17, 2018, 11:47:42 AM
I hope I’m not sounding too dumb or going off subject.
Reference to the #1 treatment of mango trees a few weeks ago when they were all blossoming and how to get the highest yield by preventing powdery mildew and anthracnose on the new growth and flowers.
Last year at a Miami Rare Fruit council lecture on mango diseases a Dr McMillan who is a very published plant pathologist probably in his mid to upper 80’s gave us the bottom line from all the research projects done on this topic.
Abound plus New-Film 17 gave the best results by far. No contest.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 17, 2018, 02:04:46 PM
Yes, that is definitely a great conventional treatment.  Remember to alternate with some very different product, to avoid breeding resistance to Abound.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on March 17, 2018, 02:15:28 PM
Yes, that is definitely a great conventional treatment.  Remember to alternate with some very different product, to avoid breeding resistance to Abound.

Abound is going to become worthless at the rate people are using it these days.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on March 17, 2018, 03:01:00 PM
Switch and / or a copper-based fungicide are great alternators for Abound.

I think commercial growers represent the biggest risk to group 11 resistance. Dooryard growers are unlikely to spend the time and money on a comprehensive fungicide routine, at least not on a regular basis.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 20, 2018, 05:00:13 PM
And I still haven't heard of a recommended treatment protocol for Mango Bacterial Black Spot specifically.  So it's just muddling along with Copper products and other products labeled for other bacteria.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: strkpr00 on March 28, 2018, 10:15:10 PM
just some more information to digest.

http://plantpath.ifas.ufl.edu/media/plantpathifasufledu/factsheets/pp0023.pdf (http://plantpath.ifas.ufl.edu/media/plantpathifasufledu/factsheets/pp0023.pdf)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 29, 2018, 09:38:56 AM
Though one column of that chart is dedicated to "bacterial black spot", the text contains no mention of it, and there is no picture.

The text describes anthracnose spots on leaves as "angular", which seems to have been more associated with bacterial black spot in illustrations I've seen from abroad.

The designation of 'Florigon' as highly susceptible to bacterial black spot is probably a typo--- like the spelling of 'Nam Doc Mai' as "Man dok Mai".  I believe 'Florigon' is highly resistant.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on March 29, 2018, 11:11:34 AM
Given the year that PDF was published, I'm guessing that they are referring to the BBS that infects leaves (not the new variant which infects fruits).
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: mangokothiyan on March 29, 2018, 11:24:59 AM
The website states that you can get it at HD, but HD only carries a different product then the one shown on the vendor website. The HD version is a combo product that is not shown in the vendor website.

Do you have a HD sku number for the Organocide™ Plant Doctor?


The sku is on this [url]http://www.organiclabs.com/Images/LabelImages/Plant%20Doctor%20Back%20Label%20Booklet%20Instructions%20for%20Use.pdf[/url] ([url]http://www.organiclabs.com/Images/LabelImages/Plant%20Doctor%20Back%20Label%20Booklet%20Instructions%20for%20Use.pdf[/url])
It is at the Home Depot in Jupiter and you can also find it online at Ebay. 
It clears up Anthracnose faster and better than anything I have ever used.



How much liquid do you use per gallon of Plant Doctor?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: strkpr00 on March 29, 2018, 05:40:30 PM
Given the year that PDF was published, I'm guessing that they are referring to the BBS that infects leaves (not the new variant which infects fruits).

I was wondering how much has changed since it was published.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on March 30, 2018, 10:19:22 AM
Organocide Plant Doctor is a registered pesticide, so you must follow the label.

There are other phosphites that are labeled as fertilizer....
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on April 14, 2018, 07:57:36 PM
Hello,

I'm almost afraid to ask this.  I notice a couple of my leaves on my Sweet Tart have black blemishes.  There's really only 1 leaf that has a lot of it.  I'm afraid it's bacterial black spot, but I'm not sure.  Sweet Tart is my favorite mango, and I'd be extremely sad if it's BBS, especially considering I bought the tree last year as a 7 gallon and haven't even had 1 fruit from it.  Other than the couple of leaves, the tree looks pretty healthy to me.  Should I be concerned or is it nothing?

(https://s14.postimg.cc/x4vgzzsil/20180414_184621.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/x4vgzzsil/)

(https://s14.postimg.cc/vd2i52m0d/20180414_184629.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vd2i52m0d/)

(https://s14.postimg.cc/ywofuv1kt/20180414_184705.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ywofuv1kt/)

(https://s14.postimg.cc/yjx1oor0t/20180414_184707.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yjx1oor0t/)

(https://s14.postimg.cc/y75niivwd/20180414_184800.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/y75niivwd/)

(https://s14.postimg.cc/6wkcakqel/20180414_184812.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6wkcakqel/)

(https://s14.postimg.cc/pc4t80etp/20180414_184835.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pc4t80etp/)

(https://s14.postimg.cc/pc4t7yp3h/20180414_184908.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pc4t7yp3h/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on April 14, 2018, 09:52:27 PM
Hello,

I'm almost afraid to ask this.  I notice a couple of my leaves on my Sweet Tart have black blemishes.  There's really only 1 leaf that has a lot of it.  I'm afraid it's bacterial black spot, but I'm not sure.  Sweet Tart is my favorite mango, and I'd be extremely sad if it's BBS, especially considering I bought the tree last year as a 7 gallon and haven't even had 1 fruit from it.  Other than the couple of leaves, the tree looks pretty healthy to me.  Should I be concerned or is it nothing?

(https://s14.postimg.cc/x4vgzzsil/20180414_184621.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/x4vgzzsil/)

(https://s14.postimg.cc/vd2i52m0d/20180414_184629.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/vd2i52m0d/)

(https://s14.postimg.cc/ywofuv1kt/20180414_184705.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ywofuv1kt/)

(https://s14.postimg.cc/yjx1oor0t/20180414_184707.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/yjx1oor0t/)

(https://s14.postimg.cc/y75niivwd/20180414_184800.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/y75niivwd/)

(https://s14.postimg.cc/6wkcakqel/20180414_184812.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6wkcakqel/)

(https://s14.postimg.cc/pc4t80etp/20180414_184835.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pc4t80etp/)

(https://s14.postimg.cc/pc4t7yp3h/20180414_184908.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pc4t7yp3h/)

It’s bacterial spot. At least the foliar form of it. Not a big deal unless you also have the strain that attacks the fruit.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on April 14, 2018, 11:30:23 PM
Remove those infected leaves, since there are so few, and it is so easy to do.  Discard in city trash.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on April 15, 2018, 01:42:53 PM
Thanks Alex and Har.  So I guess at this point I just need to wait to see if the fruit develops it too.  What are the odds my fruit would have BBS considering the tree has foliar BBS?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on April 15, 2018, 02:11:13 PM
Foliar BBS and fruit BBS are completely different. For example, NDM readily gets foliar BBS, but I've never seen it on the fruit. Foliar BBS can generally be ignored.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on April 15, 2018, 02:16:46 PM
Thanks Alex and Har.  So I guess at this point I just need to wait to see if the fruit develops it too.  What are the odds my fruit would have BBS considering the tree has foliar BBS?

There’s no direct correlation. Sweet Tart can get both.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on April 15, 2018, 02:55:18 PM
Thanks Alex & Cookie Monster.  I'm hoping my trees stay safe from the fruit BBS.  There's no preventative measures that we know of at this point right (for fruit BBS)?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on April 15, 2018, 04:57:33 PM
Thanks Alex & Cookie Monster.  I'm hoping my trees stay safe from the fruit BBS.  There's no preventative measures that we know of at this point right (for fruit BBS)?

Lots of copper. Practicing Good orchard sanitation. Windbreaks.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: spaugh on April 15, 2018, 11:04:23 PM
Foliar BBS and fruit BBS are completely different. For example, NDM readily gets foliar BBS, but I've never seen it on the fruit. Foliar BBS can generally be ignored.

Does it spread to other trees easily?  I have 1 tree that has it in the leaves.  Tree is still in a 5gal pot.  Not sure what to do with it?  I could probably strip all leaves and it would come back ok.  Its in a greenhouse and all the mango trees in there are growing nicely.  Just dont want to infect the rest of them.  It sucks they are shipping this from FL to CA
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on April 16, 2018, 06:24:47 AM
Was it shipped through the mail?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on April 16, 2018, 06:33:28 AM
At Palm Beach County Rare Fruit Council plant sales, I have been head plant inspector for years.  I have cut off any leaves or twigs that I believed to have Mango Bacterial Black Spot, on lightly infested plants.  Otherwise, I have rejected plants from the sale.  I have been regarded as overly picky.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on April 16, 2018, 07:06:45 AM
Does it spread to other trees easily?  I have 1 tree that has it in the leaves.  Tree is still in a 5gal pot.  Not sure what to do with it?

I'd treat it with a systemic copper.  Phyton 35 (expensive) or Magnabon CS2005. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: strkpr00 on May 13, 2018, 08:05:25 PM
This mango fell from my Hatcher. I can see fine splits in the rot spot. What dreaded disease is this?
(https://s7.postimg.cc/f80bwfn4n/20180513_152540.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/f80bwfn4n/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on May 13, 2018, 10:29:33 PM
This mango fell from my Hatcher. I can see fine splits in the rot spot. What dreaded disease is this?
(https://s7.postimg.cc/f80bwfn4n/20180513_152540.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/f80bwfn4n/)

Neofusicoccum or Phomopsis rot. You will probably lose most of the fruit to it.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: spaugh on May 23, 2018, 09:38:22 AM
Does anyone know if deer will eat mango trees?  There's certain plants like pepper trees, eucalyptus, and other things with latex sap they won't touch here.  Apparently they dont eat strawberry guavas also.  So just wondering if they might leave mangos alone since they are kind of strong smelling and sappy.  Would make planting them easier if they didn't need a fence.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FreshOne on June 09, 2018, 01:59:57 PM
Can anyone identify the problem with my Mahachanok tree? New flushes are looking yellow and brown spots on new leaves.
(https://s15.postimg.cc/rc8gv28bb/IMG_1640.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/rc8gv28bb/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on June 09, 2018, 05:55:03 PM
FreshOne,

Your MahaChanok looks deficient in Copper and Zinc and Potassium.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Orkine on June 09, 2018, 08:50:53 PM
BBS - I assume this can be transmitted through budwood / grafting.
Is there something that can be done if you are not sure if your scions are from infected trees?
Is there a best practice that will reduce the chances of passing disease along?
I want to increase my collection but don't want to introduce disease.

Big picture here, are there things as a community we should all be doing. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FreshOne on June 10, 2018, 12:45:56 AM
FreshOne,

Your MahaChanok looks deficient in Copper and Zinc and Potassium.


Thanks, this tree is in a container. I'll give it some sul-mag-po and see how it response.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on June 10, 2018, 10:34:19 AM
If you are trying to be all "organic", use seaweed in all your waterings and sprays.  This will provide some Copper and Zinc, etc.  Some kinds of rock dusts would also help.  Some chelated products and some complexed products are also labeled for use in organic production.

I don't see any indication of Mango Bacterial Black Spot (MBBS). 
[Bacterial black spots on other plants are usually other species of bacteria, which tend to be host specific, so we should not leave off the word "mango" in the name.]
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: paulmctigue on June 10, 2018, 07:38:10 PM
What's wrong with my buddies tree?
(https://s33.postimg.cc/6kpqaitvv/Attach16296_20180610_183334.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6kpqaitvv/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on June 10, 2018, 08:16:57 PM
Looks like a Keitt? I see what appears to be MBBS on the mango in the background.

What's wrong with my buddies tree?
(https://s33.postimg.cc/6kpqaitvv/Attach16296_20180610_183334.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6kpqaitvv/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: paulmctigue on June 10, 2018, 09:52:07 PM
Leaves are messed up on the edges
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: spaugh on June 10, 2018, 10:45:56 PM
Bugs are eating the leaves
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on June 10, 2018, 11:49:09 PM
Maybe old powdery mildew damage, but that is usually not that white.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fliptop on June 11, 2018, 09:12:06 PM
While out in the yard today I noticed a brown spot on the trunk of one of my Pickering trees. It's not got sap coming out, it's just a dry wound. I noticed the same thing on the trunks of some of my seedling carambola trees as well.

The Pickering is in a 7-gallon pot. We've had heavy rains recently and now it's been hot and full sun and humid, if that gives any help determining what might be going on.

Any clue as to what's caused this? And if so, what to do about it? It's one of my favorite trees and I don't want to lose it.


(https://s15.postimg.cc/fnggujhpz/20180611_205605.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fnggujhpz/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on June 12, 2018, 08:26:18 PM
Perhaps a child has gone around whacking the trunks with a stick or an umbrella tip?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: murahilin on June 12, 2018, 08:41:20 PM
While out in the yard today I noticed a brown spot on the trunk of one of my Pickering trees. It's not got sap coming out, it's just a dry wound. I noticed the same thing on the trunks of some of my seedling carambola trees as well.

The Pickering is in a 7-gallon pot. We've had heavy rains recently and now it's been hot and full sun and humid, if that gives any help determining what might be going on.

Any clue as to what's caused this? And if so, what to do about it? It's one of my favorite trees and I don't want to lose it.


(https://s15.postimg.cc/fnggujhpz/20180611_205605.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/fnggujhpz/)

That looks fatal and contagious. I think you should cut them all down and burn them.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: fliptop on June 12, 2018, 09:08:53 PM
HA! My hope is it's nothing--maybe a rodent bite?

My fear comes from having an in-ground peach tree trunk chewed up good by a rabbit and the tree ultimately died, and also a Maha Chanok tree that started with a spot of flaky bark and it ended up looking like this:


(https://s33.postimg.cc/j4s9e6kmj/20171001_080520.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/j4s9e6kmj/)

Thanks!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FreshOne on June 13, 2018, 11:09:20 PM
If you are trying to be all "organic", use seaweed in all your waterings and sprays.  This will provide some Copper and Zinc, etc.  Some kinds of rock dusts would also help.  Some chelated products and some complexed products are also labeled for use in organic production.

I don't see any indication of Mango Bacterial Black Spot (MBBS). 
[Bacterial black spots on other plants are usually other species of bacteria, which tend to be host specific, so we should not leave off the word "mango" in the name.]

I've foliage fed with southern ag citric micro-nutrients and sul-mag-po to the soil cause that's what i have. not all 'organic' at all.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on June 14, 2018, 07:58:57 AM

I've foliage fed with southern ag citric micro-nutrients and sul-mag-po to the soil cause that's what i have. not all 'organic' at all.

You're like me, you use the best approach keeping your personal health in mind and not taking risks.  I have had no luck with Southern Ag foliar treatments.  I have with Keyplex 350DP.  That is some miracle stuff especially with chlorosis prone material like Flying Dragon citrus rootstock which has a terrible time uptaking or processing micros.

BTW, if you're not adding a surfactant to your sprays, you're wasting your time.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Jose Spain on June 14, 2018, 04:27:21 PM
BTW, if you're not adding a surfactant to your sprays, you're wasting your time.

Mark, you mean any product or just some of them? For example, we must add surfactant to seaweed or phytohormones too?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on June 15, 2018, 08:14:13 AM
BTW, if you're not adding a surfactant to your sprays, you're wasting your time.

Mark, you mean any product or just some of them? For example, we must add surfactant to seaweed or phytohormones too?

No, only sprays - herbicides, pesticides.  It's a spreader-sticker and the product becomes rainfast.  I use NIS aka non-ionic surfactant.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Jose Spain on June 16, 2018, 03:09:23 AM
Got it, thank you mate. ;)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on July 12, 2018, 08:47:58 PM
I've got 2 Keitt trees with a bad case of MBBS
Just about all the fruit is split and diease ..
If I severely prune it back , taking all leaves off would this help? Or will the MBBS come back?
If I top work the tree, would this also be infected?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on July 12, 2018, 09:48:44 PM
I severely pruned mine, and it came back :-(. Now my other keitt has it too. You should be able to top work, as the disease is not systemic as far as I know.

I've got 2 Keitt trees with a bad case of MBBS
Just about all the fruit is split and diease ..
If I severely prune it back , taking all leaves off would this help? Or will the MBBS come back?
If I top work the tree, would this also be infected?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Paquicuba on July 12, 2018, 11:35:44 PM
Can someone please shed a light on what's going on with this little Pickering Tree? It looks healthy until you see that part of the bark is gone —everything is dry, no gummosis or something of that nature. Have you experienced the same issue? should I keep it or get rid of it now that it's just a little over 2' tall?

Thanks for your input!!

(https://s8.postimg.cc/pkajk66sh/IMG_1738.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pkajk66sh/)

(https://s8.postimg.cc/ys2s0v64x/IMG_1740.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ys2s0v64x/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on July 13, 2018, 10:49:57 AM
Could be sunburn or chafing injury. I would leave it and let it heal.

Can someone please shed a light on what's going on with this little Pickering Tree? It looks healthy until you see that part of the bark is gone —everything is dry, no gummosis or something of that nature. Have you experienced the same issue? should I keep it or get rid of it now that it's just a little over 2' tall?

Thanks for your input!!

(https://s8.postimg.cc/pkajk66sh/IMG_1738.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/pkajk66sh/)

(https://s8.postimg.cc/ys2s0v64x/IMG_1740.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/ys2s0v64x/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on July 13, 2018, 11:58:30 AM
Looks as though someone did a bud graft, which then died.  I hope that wasn't the 'Pickering'--- if it was, then the rest is probably Turpentine.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Paquicuba on July 13, 2018, 12:01:18 PM
Thanks a lot guys!! Great comments!! Hopefully it'll heal nicely.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: bsbullie on July 13, 2018, 02:06:54 PM
Looks as though someone did a bud graft, which then died.  I hope that wasn't the 'Pickering'--- if it was, then the rest is probably Turpentine.

That damage looks to be above the graft and tbose leaves are definitely that of  Pickering.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on July 14, 2018, 06:26:59 PM
Good.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on July 20, 2018, 05:56:31 AM
Thanks Jeff, if it came back on yours, I'm gonna top work the 2 trees I have..
Any. Suggestions on what trees are most resistance to MBBS?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Capt Ram on July 20, 2018, 05:56:39 AM
Thanks Jeff, if it came back on yours, I'm gonna top work the 2 trees I have..
Any. Suggestions on what trees are most resistance to MBBS?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: behlgarden on July 20, 2018, 05:01:21 PM
I had a ground squirrel chew my young cado, stone fruit, and mango branches, in one instance, it chewed my grafted mango right above the graft, it was pushing and then it stalled. I was pissed and wanted to yank it. it had less than 1/3rd branch left and it was 1/4" thick to begin with. In 3 weeks I see it pushing hard again and the wound is fattening and healing.

may be it will work out, not sure in the long run if that tree would be strong enough.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FruitSal on September 10, 2018, 12:35:17 PM
Hello all,

First, thank you for your very helpful posts. I have quietly consulted this forum for advice for years. I have two young (no harvest yet) mango trees: a Pickering that is growing vigorously and beautifully, and a Cogshall that looks terrible. Please help me diagnose my Cogshall's problem; is it bacterial black spot? How do I treat it?

I appreciate any thoughts on the matter!
(https://s22.postimg.cc/q2z0n1trx/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/q2z0n1trx/)

(https://s22.postimg.cc/3r17toa3h/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/3r17toa3h/)

(https://s22.postimg.cc/jp9xjuem5/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/jp9xjuem5/)

(https://s22.postimg.cc/4gk062snh/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/4gk062snh/)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on September 10, 2018, 09:44:22 PM
Mango Decline:  root difficulties and resulting multiple deficiencies, and then susceptibility to any pest or disease that comes along, such as thrips, powdery mildew, and anthracnose.  [I don't think I see any Mango Bacterial Black Spot on it.]

This is commonly caused by excess of compost, burying the tree too deep, or planting in potting soil that decomposes, settles, and becomes mucky.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: pineislander on September 11, 2018, 08:02:40 AM
Hello all,

First, thank you for your very helpful posts. I have quietly consulted this forum for advice for years. I have two young (no harvest yet) mango trees: a Pickering that is growing vigorously and beautifully, and a Cogshall that looks terrible. Please help me diagnose my Cogshall's problem; is it bacterial black spot? How do I treat it?

I appreciate any thoughts on the matter!

Interesting is that many of your leaves look similar to a tree I was dealing with this time last year. As you can see just one micronutrient and fish emulsion spray and gypsum on soil cleared up the problem and this year the tree is very happy.

http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=1001.msg312557;topicseen#msg312557 (http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=1001.msg312557;topicseen#msg312557)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Orkine on September 22, 2018, 06:24:05 PM
I dont know what I need to do to fix this.

These are grafts on a recently top-worked tree.
The grafts took but the growth is anemic at best.  The leaves are tiny and even when there has been a second flush it sits right on the first making it look more like a rose than a mango (see fourth and fifth picture).

Should I feed this plant Nitrogen, it needs to grow.
I have or can get fertilizer with minors if that is what this baby needs.

(https://thumb.ibb.co/msGyxU/IMG_20180920_191702934.jpg) (https://ibb.co/msGyxU) (https://thumb.ibb.co/dpK7rp/IMG_20180920_191710775.jpg) (https://ibb.co/dpK7rp) (https://thumb.ibb.co/cycGj9/IMG_20180920_191713165.jpg) (https://ibb.co/cycGj9) (https://thumb.ibb.co/ffRnrp/IMG_20180920_191716615_BURST000_COVER_TOP.jpg) (https://ibb.co/ffRnrp) (https://thumb.ibb.co/byCSrp/IMG_20180920_191719308.jpg) (https://ibb.co/byCSrp)


This is my most recent graft on the same stump and the first flush here look more normal.  The blue dots are from a recent spray of copper.

(https://thumb.ibb.co/b7T0Bp/IMG_20180920_191659491.jpg) (https://ibb.co/b7T0Bp)

In case it is relevant, I don't irrigate or fertilize my lawn - which comes right up next to the tree.  I use a mulching mower to the grass clipping return to the soil.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on September 24, 2018, 08:02:21 AM
I always recommend fertilizing recently top-work-grafted mangos with a full-mix fertilizer (i.e., Nitrogen-containing fertilizer with all the other nutrients too, and Calcium, if the soil isn't lime laden).
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on September 24, 2018, 11:26:18 AM
I no longer do complete cutback for top-working. Instead, I'll lop off 1/3 to 1/2 of the tree then graft the resulting sprouts. The rest gets top-worked in the following years. This leaves the tree with foliage and allows it to continue to photosynthesize.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on September 29, 2018, 12:04:55 PM
Will someone ID this pest, please?  Whatever this is, my Cogshall is being hit pretty hard with it.  A Pickering, about 10 feet away, has none of this.
Also, with the frequent posts about rodent control, I wanted to intro Rio.  A feral/stray cat who showed up in my backyard one day.  My other cat, Gio, took a liking to him and the rest is history.  He likes to hang out in the yard.  His hunting skills are without equal.  Mice, rats, snakes, lizards, and squirrels have all been victimized by this guy.  Very effective, organic, works cheap. 
(https://i.postimg.cc/gXJ13pCj/20180929_102423.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/gXJ13pCj)

(https://i.postimg.cc/ThBB5ZC2/20180929_102442.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/ThBB5ZC2)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Orkine on September 29, 2018, 01:50:18 PM
I no longer do complete cutback for top-working. Instead, I'll lop off 1/3 to 1/2 of the tree then graft the resulting sprouts. The rest gets top-worked in the following years. This leaves the tree with foliage and allows it to continue to photosynthesize.
That is how I am doing the next two topworks.
I took the first third of my starter tree (a Tommy A that I got from Home Depot more than 13 years ago) and a second tree from the same period is now 1/3 whatever it used to be, with a number of varieties grafted on for a 4 of 5 in one tree in the future.  Grafts on these trees grow very nicely.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: pineislander on September 29, 2018, 07:51:26 PM
Will someone ID this pest, please?  Whatever this is, my Cogshall is being hit pretty hard with it.  A Pickering, about 10 feet away, has none of this.
Also, with the frequent posts about rodent control, I wanted to intro Rio.  A feral/stray cat who showed up in my backyard one day.  My other cat, Gio, took a liking to him and the rest is history.  He likes to hang out in the yard.  His hunting skills are without equal.  Mice, rats, snakes, lizards, and squirrels have all been victimized by this guy.  Very effective, organic, works cheap. 
(https://i.postimg.cc/gXJ13pCj/20180929_102423.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/gXJ13pCj)

(https://i.postimg.cc/ThBB5ZC2/20180929_102442.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/ThBB5ZC2)
Could be spiderweb or Fall Webworm. Inspect inside web for moth larvae.
https://www.hgtv.com/outdoors/gardens/planting-and-maintenance/fall-webworms (https://www.hgtv.com/outdoors/gardens/planting-and-maintenance/fall-webworms)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on September 30, 2018, 12:32:07 PM
Or possibly spider-mites, which you may need magnification to see.  There is probably no visible damage, right?

Twirl most of it off onto a stick, just before you spray hard with water.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on September 30, 2018, 01:51:30 PM
Correct.  No visible damage and nothing visible inside the webs.  Knocked off most with a stick, then blasted all with the hose.  Seems to be a minor issue.  Appreciate the help.  Thank you.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Orkine on October 11, 2018, 08:19:46 PM
I did several mango graft this season and got many good takes.
On one of the grafts, I recently took off the binding which was not expanding with the plant.  It had started to girdle it but I got it in time and the plant appears to have recovered (the compressed portion has increased in thickness to match the rest of the branch.)
I noticed a few days ago that some sap had oozed out at the graft location.  I am wondering if in expanding the back got cracked allowing something to infect the joint.  Has anyone observed this and is there anything I should do? 

The tree the graft is on is one I am top working.  The tree pushing new growth heavily and all over, including on the new grafts and the untrimmed parts of the original tree.  The tree looks very healthy other than this oozing sap which also is observed at one more graft location.  Other grafts on the tree look fine, the two with the sap had some stress.


The first had the wrapping left on too long on the graft. used to be thinner but you can hardly tell.  If I am going to lose this I can start prepping budwood from it to graft elsewhere.
(https://thumb.ibb.co/dCrQm9/IMG-20181011-204226704.jpg) (https://ibb.co/dCrQm9) (https://thumb.ibb.co/h8y5m9/IMG-20181011-204314710.jpg) (https://ibb.co/h8y5m9) (https://thumb.ibb.co/hzhWR9/IMG-20181011-204303696.jpg) (https://ibb.co/hzhWR9)


The top of the graft on this broke in a wind event.  A small piece that was left had 2 buds, both pushed.  One has sap and the other does not.   
(https://thumb.ibb.co/kUMQm9/IMG-20181011-204352478.jpg) (https://ibb.co/kUMQm9) (https://thumb.ibb.co/k7zpDp/IMG-20181011-204405361.jpg) (https://ibb.co/k7zpDp)


 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on October 12, 2018, 08:59:14 AM
Orkine -- looks fine to me.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Orkine on October 13, 2018, 08:25:47 AM
Orkine -- looks fine to me.
Thanks Jeff, that's good news.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Lionking on October 14, 2018, 01:34:47 PM
Good morning my friends,

     I’m in need of some help and advice.  I have a couple of mango trees that I’m sure are in need of nutrients.  I have been following this thread to try to compare the symptoms on my trees to those of fellow members.
From the pictures I have seen,  and the advice I have read,  I can tell my trees are in need of nutrients and that there might be some other issues.
I water every 3 to 4 days with city water,  recently added a bit of epsom per recommended dosage as well as a bit of sulfur also per recommended dosage.
Some help and advice will be appreciated.  What nutrients does one recommend.
These pictures were taken this morning
Pictures 1 and 4 same tree- Manila seedling in 5 gallon pot
Pictures 5 and 6 are lemon zest in 7 gallon pot
Pictures 2,3,7and 8 are coconut cream in 25 gallon pot


(https://i.postimg.cc/phs9GV01/82-F9717-C-5-C90-4276-825-F-D790698-E63-C3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/phs9GV01)

(https://i.postimg.cc/7CyTbWGX/98-D755-EA-7377-4-EBD-858-C-87-EF6-A0530-D1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/7CyTbWGX)

(https://i.postimg.cc/BXkFf6Jr/999-CCCC5-8-EDA-4045-9042-3-E2154-C86912.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/BXkFf6Jr)

(https://i.postimg.cc/68ZvWX3y/9-D21-C50-A-9575-4-F66-BD82-19-AD4-ED1-A5-A3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/68ZvWX3y)

(https://i.postimg.cc/2qFLW7nY/AB7779-F4-6416-49-DA-B27-F-8-C680-A6-FE5-DE.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/2qFLW7nY)

(https://i.postimg.cc/HcYc98ty/E392360-E-EEF1-4-ADC-A878-85503-E6-D5-F6-B.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/HcYc98ty)

(https://i.postimg.cc/pppjS8MQ/E848-C4-C0-9568-433-C-B5-B8-73932-C81-DD05.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/pppjS8MQ)

(https://i.postimg.cc/9zXZGKxn/F90205-F3-09-B0-4-FDE-9-F91-6-A71-AE611-FA7.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/9zXZGKxn)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Lionking on October 14, 2018, 01:51:26 PM
Forgot to mention that I also have other mango trees that don’t have these issues.
2 - OS on terpentine
1- keit
1- pineapple pleasure grafted onto Manila
1- PPK
1- ST
1- peach cobbler grafted onto a Keitt
1- peach cobbler grafted onto corriente
As welll as several Manila and corriente seedlings that I plan to use for rootstock.
All are doing well.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 14, 2018, 10:52:17 PM
Spray new growth with a full micronutrient mix plus extra Copper, per labels, to correct deficiencies of Copper, Zinc, Iron and Manganese, and to suppress Powdery Mildew.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Lionking on October 15, 2018, 12:51:38 AM
Spray new growth with a full micronutrient mix plus extra Copper, per labels, to correct deficiencies of Copper, Zinc, Iron and Manganese, and to suppress Powdery Mildew.

Thanks Har,
I will take care of that first thing.. I appreciate your help and advice!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Samu on October 15, 2018, 08:44:38 PM
I need help identifying this what look abnormality to me on my "Golek" mango leaves; have some gray/brow-nish  spots along the middle on both sides of the mature leaves; (the younger leaves look ok);  please see photos below. My other 4 mango trees don't have this symptoms.
Thanks in advance for your help!

Top side:
(https://i.postimg.cc/s1kK08XW/Golek-top-leave.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/s1kK08XW)

Underside:
(https://i.postimg.cc/cgKMFMGT/Golek-bot-leave.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/cgKMFMGT)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 16, 2018, 10:46:47 AM
Samu, did you spray before these marks appeared, such as with an emulsion, or oil, or soap?

On one hand, the actively spreading blackening of the tissue, around the dead grey areas, looks like an infection, perhaps fungal;  on the other hand, the placement of the spots along the midvein, on many of the leaves, seems curiously regular, which would be unusual with an infection.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Samu on October 16, 2018, 12:03:28 PM
No, I didn't spray with anything on this mango tree.
I first noticed this symptom last May, so it looks like
it doesn't effect the growth of the tree, as far as I can tell.

Assuming this tree is infected by fungus or other micro organisms,
what would you recommend for me to use?
Thanks for taking the time and response, Har!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 16, 2018, 01:30:20 PM
Spraying with any micro-nutrient mix, plus additional Copper, can toughen the leaves against spread of most diseases.

So can a separate spray with Phosphite and Silicon.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Samu on October 16, 2018, 03:37:07 PM
OK Har, I will do that, thanks again!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: pocketsandmangos on October 28, 2018, 08:32:47 PM
Made a recent post about this...but it seems this may be the best place to start!

noticed browning / blotching on leaves recently. Glenn and Valencia pride. Plants are potted in Pro Mix HP. Currently watering every 3-4 days here in Fort Myers as the rain has definitely let up. Both trees are flushing/growing still. Thanks!


(https://i.postimg.cc/18XwJsyf/Mango-Leaf-1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/18XwJsyf)


(https://i.postimg.cc/2bQZV57X/Mango-leaf-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/2bQZV57X)

(https://i.postimg.cc/K45TbRz1/Mango-leaf-3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/K45TbRz1)

(https://i.postimg.cc/nMCS5bT9/Mango-leaf-4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/nMCS5bT9)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on October 29, 2018, 04:42:28 PM
I am not familiar with the mosaic look in the first picture.  Was any herbicide used on a nearby property?

The other pictures look pretty good.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on November 03, 2018, 05:58:13 PM
Mature Cogshall.  Produced about 80 mangoes this season.  After harvest it had a hearty growth flush in the upper portion of the tree.
But if you look at the photos you'll see many of the lower branches have no vegetation and are completely dry and apparently dead.  I tried tipping all of them about two months ago, hoping to encourage growth, but nothing.  What might be happening?


(https://i.postimg.cc/5jJhvCmL/20181103-174531.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/5jJhvCmL)


(https://i.postimg.cc/Tp4NkLnk/20181103-174626.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/Tp4NkLnk)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: pineislander on November 03, 2018, 06:47:06 PM
Your lower branches in heavy shade may have decided to die back. Pruning should include periodically shortening some branches and opening the interior canopy at the top to let light in. Hard to tell from the picture but the tree may not be getting much light from the sides which is usually the reason for lower branches dying off.

Cogshall is usually a slow grower but can get dense from the two trees I have. I see your tree at an early stage developed a double trunk be aware that a tight crotch angle like this will eventually become a weak point on a tree and should have been avoided. What happens is the two branches as they grow will include bark between them such that they don't actually have a union along the crotch. The tight angle puts most stress at the lower end of the crotch and if a wind event or heavy fruit load occurs it is much more likely to cause the tree to split.

I recently walked a 3 year old orchard and saw nearly 10% of trees had double trunks with angles like that. The problem will become worse as the trees get older you could easily lose 1/2 the tree and maybe set the whole tree up for failure as such damage would be a perfect place for rot and be hard to heal.

Looking at the picture again you might consider taking the right side fork down quite a bit next year to see if it can have less stress and help re-build the lower canopy, if there is enough light. That branch is growing more horizontal towards the fence and will have the most stress. That would also lessen the stress on the crotch. Maybe a cut near the growth ring on that branch where it turns more horizontal about 2 feet above the crotch should stimulate new growth. Your decision and you may lose crop for a year or two on that branch, less chance of that if you do it early.

Crotch angle:
https://www.phillyorchards.org/tag/crotch-angle/ (https://www.phillyorchards.org/tag/crotch-angle/)

Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: MangoCountry on November 03, 2018, 10:52:11 PM
Ive noticed the underside of my Lemon Meringue leaves look like this. The tops look fine and healthy. Does anyone know the cause and if its an issue. There are no insects or insect damage. Thank you.
(https://beta-static.photobucket.com/images/y304/mannsnick/0/b0908513-560d-4c2f-b2fa-9e96b4b6cbf2-original.jpg?width=1920&height=1080&fit=bounds) (https://beta.photobucket.com/u/mannsnick/p/b0908513-560d-4c2f-b2fa-9e96b4b6cbf2)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 04, 2018, 01:53:00 PM
Did you look at it under magnification?  Are the spots slightly raised?  Any white exoskeletons lying about?

Did you spray with a nutritional mix, or any other spray?

Are the leaves near the ground?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: MangoCountry on November 04, 2018, 02:23:49 PM
Hey Har. The leaf is smooth no bumps an no exoskeletons. It is less than a foot off the ground.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 04, 2018, 09:33:29 PM
Possibly soil splash-up.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mango Stein on November 04, 2018, 11:21:41 PM
An update to the mango-splitting and spike-necrotizing issue I had. Boron seems to have resolved this issue. I applied it mostly through foliar spray. Now good fruit set.

(https://i.postimg.cc/RqQq7Mrz/kwan.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/RqQq7Mrz)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 05, 2018, 09:47:06 AM
Yes!  Spraying Boron and chelated Calcium on open mango blooms can make a huge difference in fruit set.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on November 05, 2018, 02:50:56 PM
I'd like to try the boron and calcium.  Any recommended product I can purchase?  Thank you.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 05, 2018, 07:52:12 PM
Brexil Ca + B, which is carried by Helena Chemicals.  If you are not in the trade....

There are several other similar products at other suppliers.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on November 08, 2018, 07:54:40 AM
I'd like to try the boron and calcium.  Any recommended product I can purchase?  Thank you.

I use Solubor as a foliar spray on grapevines & a soil drench on stuff like cados and mangos.  Less is more regarding B.  Most plant foods contain B.

Depending on your soil profile Ca can be applied via gypsum or lime.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 08, 2018, 09:31:00 AM
What I recommended is specifically to spray on OPEN mango bloom.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: dross99_si on November 14, 2018, 04:21:58 PM
Our baby mango plants have been doing great up until recently. Is this anthracnose, BBS, powdery mildew or some other form of disease? Can it be treated or no? What is our best course of action in this situation?
Thanks guys!
(https://i.postimg.cc/0b3mh13p/237-AE03-D-03-A3-4-D38-A88-F-1-AFC50864-DCE.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/0b3mh13p)

(https://i.postimg.cc/hfhTCtCD/54-A51623-27-BE-45-A2-A166-F29-FECD72944.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/hfhTCtCD)

(https://i.postimg.cc/vD05LVt2/6059-E2-B3-9-D68-4358-A95-B-1-AFCE66-B2027.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/vD05LVt2)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 15, 2018, 11:15:51 AM
This is powdery mildew damage.  Copper sprays can suppress the spread of powdery mildew and anthracnose, etc.

If you have a sprayer with a very good jet agitator inside the tank, you can spray elemental Sulfur--- only in cool weather.

Perhaps some of the live, biological sprays would work, but I have never tried those;  I assume they won't work if the trees have been sprayed with Copper in the last month or two, so it is either/or.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: dross99_si on November 15, 2018, 02:13:20 PM
Thanks Har. Any particular spray you can suggest? Or perhaps post a link to a good product?
Thank you
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on November 30, 2018, 11:39:01 AM
A few weeks ago I posted here about my concern for my Cogshall.  Starting early this past summer I began to notice several of the lower branches losing their leaves.  As the summer moved into autumn those branches were completely defoliated and eventually became dry and dead. I could easily snap the branch off the tree.  I pruned the affected branches, hoping to stimulate growth but to no avail.
Now the dying branches are moving up the tree and I'm beginning to see the same problem spreading.  Any ideas what's happening?

(https://i.postimg.cc/cKf5tzvZ/20181130-091145.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/cKf5tzvZ)

(https://i.postimg.cc/YGYk98Hm/20181130-091138.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/YGYk98Hm)

(https://i.postimg.cc/dLHMJgyx/20181130-091207.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/dLHMJgyx)

(https://i.postimg.cc/hz1DsM5R/20181130-091235.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/hz1DsM5R)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 30, 2018, 01:03:55 PM
Could you please post close-up pictures, top and botoom, of still-alive but already affected leaves?

Also of the still-alive but sick twigs?

Is there sap oozing anywhere?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Carbo on November 30, 2018, 03:23:09 PM
I haven't seen any sap on any part of the tree.
As for photos, I took a few more that I hope help diagnose the problem.  You'll see the leaves have what I think is probably a bacterial infection.  The bark on some of the branches is falling off, too.

(https://i.postimg.cc/nsyH7CTQ/8.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/nsyH7CTQ)

(https://i.postimg.cc/Vr4mhDmX/9.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/Vr4mhDmX)

(https://i.postimg.cc/NLzwryMG/4.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/NLzwryMG)

(https://i.postimg.cc/R3N7hbbZ/2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/R3N7hbbZ)

(https://i.postimg.cc/XpLd80Rv/3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/XpLd80Rv)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on November 30, 2018, 08:28:48 PM
The missing bark is probably from an impact injury.

The curling burnt leaves are probably from Powdery Mildew.

The spotted bark....?

The angular black spots with yellow halos on the leaves are probably Mango Bacterial Black Spot.

The majority of the leaves are nutritionally deficient in Manganese and Iron.

Have you had a soil test and mango leaf tissue test (for nutritional status)?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on December 09, 2018, 09:19:14 AM
Brexil Ca + B, which is carried by Helena Chemicals.  If you are not in the trade....

There are several other similar products at other suppliers.


Hi Har,

Hopefully, I'm not derailing too much.  I'm trying to maximize mango yield, and instead of the Brexil Ca + B, I'm thinking of using Grow Scripts (https://www.growscripts.com/shop/bloomtime-formula-calcium-magnesium-boron-blend/ (https://www.growscripts.com/shop/bloomtime-formula-calcium-magnesium-boron-blend/)) Calcium Magnesium Boron Blend (4.5% Calcium / 2.25% Magnesium / 0.50% Boron and 0.10% Humic Acid).  The concentrations don't look as potent as the Brexil, but I hope it will work.

I will spray copper on newly formed spikes before flowers open, and planning on using the Bonide concentrate (http://www.bonide.com/assets/Products/Labels/l811.pdf (http://www.bonide.com/assets/Products/Labels/l811.pdf)) as they claim it helps with Powdery Mildew as well.  Is the Bonide a good product to use on the initial spikes? 

I'm looking for a cheap sprayer that works well for applying the Copper.  Is this one From Harbor Freight good - https://www.harborfreight.com/1-14-gal-home-and-garden-sprayer-63145.html (https://www.harborfreight.com/1-14-gal-home-and-garden-sprayer-63145.html) ?  I only have 3 smallish trees, so don't need a high end sprayer, just something that sprays a nice mist and helps me get the job done fast.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: hawkfish007 on December 10, 2018, 02:53:43 PM
I bought a 5 gallon CAC from Exotica this weekend, and it had some black spots on leaves and white spots under the leaves. Steve cleaned the leaves as much as he could before the sale. I was a little hesitant and afraid that it will spread to my existing mango trees, but still bought it since I haven't seen CAC in stock at other nurseries locally. Black spot is removable with a paper towel and white spots are removable with fingernails (they just slide off). I applied Neem oil about 3 days ago and I still see a lot of white spots under the leaves. I left the tree in the front yard away from other mangoes. What is the best remedy?

Thanks.


(https://i.postimg.cc/xqP5C1rw/IMG-0357.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/xqP5C1rw)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: spaugh on December 10, 2018, 04:40:24 PM
I bought a 5 gallon CAC from Exotica this weekend, and it had some black spots on leaves and white spots under the leaves. Steve cleaned the leaves as much as he could before the sale. I was a little hesitant and afraid that it will spread to my existing mango trees, but still bought it since I haven't seen CAC in stock at other nurseries locally. Black spot is removable with a paper towel and white spots are removable with fingernails (they just slide off). I applied Neem oil about 3 days ago and I still see a lot of white spots under the leaves. I left the tree in the front yard away from other mangoes. What is the best remedy?

Thanks.


(https://i.postimg.cc/xqP5C1rw/IMG-0357.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/xqP5C1rw)

Hard to tell from the pics but maybe scale.  A lot of his plants have scale.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 10, 2018, 09:24:21 PM
Mango scale.  If the scale is already dead and dried up, it will just flake off.  If it is still alive (or if it is recently dead and not yet dried up), it will smear, or leave a wet spot.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 10, 2018, 09:28:14 PM
FLMikey,  the Calcium-Magnesium-Boron product is probably good.  The Bonide product is labeled for avocados, but not mangos.  The sprayer should work for a year or so, until the trees get bigger.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: hawkfish007 on December 11, 2018, 12:00:34 AM
Mango scale.  If the scale is already dead and dried up, it will just flake off.  If it is still alive (or if it is recently dead and not yet dried up), it will smear, or leave a wet spot.

Har and Spaugh, thanks for the positive identification. I tried to get rid of the scales and sooty mold by hand using paper towels as much as I could today. There are just too many leaves, lol. Sprayed with neem oil as well. Hope CAC will recover soon now that it is under full sun.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 11, 2018, 05:42:58 AM
Drenching the soil, or spraying the leaves with an Azadirachtin-containing product, such as Aza-Sol (OMRI approved), will prevent immature scale and other insect pests from molting--- so no successful reproduction.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: hawkfish007 on December 11, 2018, 10:49:48 AM
Drenching the soil, or spraying the leaves with an Azadirachtin-containing product, such as Aza-Sol (OMRI approved), will prevent immature scale and other insect pests from molting--- so no successful reproduction.

I am so relieved that scales can be controlled easily. I also found this on plantwise website "Scales are spread mostly through movement of nursery stock that is infected. Scales rarely spread from plant to plant unless the plant branches are in contact. The eggs hatch into young small scales called "crawlers" which emerge from the protective shell. Short range spreading takes place as crawlers search out places to settle and feed."

Is Neem Oil an effective cheap alternative of Aza-Sol at a higher dosage since both has Azadiractin?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: AggrOnline on December 11, 2018, 12:22:04 PM

(https://i.postimg.cc/BtPdwL2G/IMG-20181211-090952.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/BtPdwL2G)

(https://i.postimg.cc/m19JcJTr/IMG-20181211-090954.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/m19JcJTr)

(https://i.postimg.cc/ygkwKW5c/IMG-20181211-091006.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/ygkwKW5c)

Can any help ID what this is on my young Nam Doc Mai seedling grown from seed ?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 11, 2018, 02:17:33 PM
If you are talking about a 70% hydrophobic neem oil product, as most brands of neem oil are, then it is the cheap by-product left over after the Azadirachtin has been extracted out to be sold separately.  Then this oil has some surfactant added to help it mix with water.

Whole Neem-Oil products, such as Dyna-Gro Plant Shine, or any brand of food-grade neem oil, do contain Azadirachtin in widely varying amounts (i.e., non-standardized).  Hard to mix with cool water.  Does have other useful compounds also.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 11, 2018, 02:21:33 PM
The large black spot crossing over the midrib and other veins is probably anthracnose.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: AggrOnline on December 11, 2018, 02:56:06 PM
The large black spot crossing over the midrib and other veins is probably anthracnose.

I also see patches of it on the main stem, which is still green as the seedling is only few months old, would generous amount of Neem and all season help combat anthracnose?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 11, 2018, 04:16:24 PM
If you use more Neem than directed on the label, you will probably kill the leaves.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: DuaneC59 on December 17, 2018, 01:15:43 AM
Hi, I'm in Southern California and new to the forum.  I was seeking the forum's help with some leaf changes on a Fruit Punch mango that has been in the ground for about a month.  The mango is on a drip system and might have been over-watered.  The weather has been in the low 70s and night temps in the mid 40's.  The tree has full sun for about 7 hrs per day. I have posted some pix of the leaves and new growth.
Thanks for your help.

(https://i.postimg.cc/bD7GdvSm/1216181605a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/bD7GdvSm)


(https://i.postimg.cc/5XrffRC3/1216181604a.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/5XrffRC3)

(https://i.postimg.cc/TKsD5xS5/1216181605b.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/TKsD5xS5)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on December 17, 2018, 08:30:40 AM
Was compost or fertilizer put in the planting hole?

Is the root crown buried with soil or mulch?

Excess water, especially during cold weather, as you indicated, can produce those symptoms in the second and third photos, especially if the above problems occurred.

A month after planting is the normal time to fertilize.   Look for fertilizer that has 10% or so of Sulfur, 1 or 2 % of Iron, similar amount of Manganese, 1/2% or better of Zinc.  The micronutrients can be less if chelated or Wolftrax.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: DuaneC59 on December 18, 2018, 04:29:05 PM
No compost or fertilizer in planting hole.
Mulch is cleared from the crown.

I will cut the water way back and apply some Palm Gain: It meets the specs you posted.

Thanks Guanabanus.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: FlMikey on December 23, 2018, 05:06:54 PM
FLMikey,  the Calcium-Magnesium-Boron product is probably good.  The Bonide product is labeled for avocados, but not mangos.  The sprayer should work for a year or so, until the trees get bigger.


Thanks for your help Har!  I have some more questions please.

I'll choose Southern AG's Copper Fungicide instead as the label indicates it's for Mango use (https://images.homedepot-static.com/catalog/pdfImages/04/0428f02d-3863-44a4-957b-692ac31a4366.pdf (https://images.homedepot-static.com/catalog/pdfImages/04/0428f02d-3863-44a4-957b-692ac31a4366.pdf))

In this thread, (http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=13852.0 (http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=13852.0)), you mention wettable Sulfur can be added to the Copper.  I was thinking of using this Hi Yield wettable sulfur (https://www.groworganic.com/hiyield-wettable-sulfur-4-lb.html (https://www.groworganic.com/hiyield-wettable-sulfur-4-lb.html)).  Would I mix the up the Copper and Sulfur together, and when the pannicle is 2 inches spray the mixed solution on the whole tree (leaves & pannicle)?  I would continue this process until flowers are present, at which point, I would spray the flowers with the GrowScripts Calcium/Magnesium/Boron spray once and stop with the Copper & Sulfur?  The next phase would be waiting for the little green fruits to set, then I continue spraying the Copper and Sulfur mix monthly until harvest. 

Apologies for the beginner questions - but have never implemented a spraying regimen, and trying maximize the number of mango's from my few trees.  Thanks!!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: chad6159 on December 24, 2018, 10:33:26 PM
Hey guys, this mango tree was already in place when I bought my house, it was one of three mango trees.however, this tree has always had issues.  We cut it way back to just its main trunk a while ago and new growth is happening. However the new growth does not look very good. It was getting attacked by aphids so I was spraying it with neem oil. That seemed to take care of that issue. But the leaves are still deformed and are very splotchy. I have sprayed it twice with copper and that didn’t seem to help much, if at all. I thought maybe it was a nutritional issue so I gave it some fertilizer a couple months ago and epsom salt. No change so far... on some parts the new growth looks nice but then quickly turns splotchy. In other spots the new growth is all deformed from the start.. what do you guys think it is?

(https://i.postimg.cc/cvMTdwTW/DAE798-EE-C6-D2-4876-92-B8-7411-A9-FAB5-B6.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/cvMTdwTW)

(https://i.postimg.cc/LJMNdNtv/DBBB1-C96-3-ED3-4-A98-A210-BD73-D8181-DE3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/LJMNdNtv)

This pic you can see the leaves are normal shaped but are starting to get splotchy.


(https://i.postimg.cc/YLWfZWjJ/5-ACFC934-9-E39-40-AA-852-E-43-A49809-E9-FA.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/YLWfZWjJ)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Orkine on December 25, 2018, 02:23:05 PM
Had an accidental salt spill on one of my in pot mangos recently.
About a week or two ago, the plant which was close to my water softener accidentally got some salt pellets spilled on it (while adding salt to the backflush system).
I picked off all of the pellets even the partial pieces that I could see.
A week or two later I started seeing leaves on a very healthy grafted plant curl and turn brown.

I assume some of the salt, finer than I could see must have stayed both on the plant and got in the pot.  I have watters a couple of times in the last two weeks and it has rained a couple of times too.  I think its the salt.

Today I gave it a couple of very thorough soakings and let it drain, is this sufficient or should I be doing something else.  If it will help, I can take it out of the pot, wash it to bare root and repot.

It is a Taralay grafted to some unknown seedling.

 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: dross99_si on December 26, 2018, 10:50:31 AM
Pickering pushed some new growth but leaves look deformed. Any ideas on the cause?
(https://i.postimg.cc/DJjYYw1s/09528808-89-B5-45-C9-B33-D-D815-A240-B8-C1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/DJjYYw1s)

(https://i.postimg.cc/ykSrvBxg/4-A0-DC2-AB-7227-4-F6-A-8-F29-6-CED0-C25-BC5-C.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/ykSrvBxg)

(https://i.postimg.cc/w184rPRW/BE5-B3436-1946-49-F1-BAD8-09-F69-AC0-B67-E.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/w184rPRW)

(https://i.postimg.cc/Wtzyq0P7/ECACCCD9-E43-C-41-DB-BDBE-1-E0-FAEA485-A8.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/Wtzyq0P7)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on December 26, 2018, 11:52:41 AM
Pickering pushed some new growth but leaves look deformed. Any ideas on the cause?
(https://i.postimg.cc/DJjYYw1s/09528808-89-B5-45-C9-B33-D-D815-A240-B8-C1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/DJjYYw1s)

(https://i.postimg.cc/ykSrvBxg/4-A0-DC2-AB-7227-4-F6-A-8-F29-6-CED0-C25-BC5-C.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/ykSrvBxg)

(https://i.postimg.cc/w184rPRW/BE5-B3436-1946-49-F1-BAD8-09-F69-AC0-B67-E.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/w184rPRW)

(https://i.postimg.cc/Wtzyq0P7/ECACCCD9-E43-C-41-DB-BDBE-1-E0-FAEA485-A8.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/Wtzyq0P7)

Mite/sucking insect damage; very typical for this time of year. In fact I’d go so far as to say it’s unusual to see in-afflicted growth at this point.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: dross99_si on December 26, 2018, 12:14:16 PM
Thanks Alex! Anything I can do to remedy or help the situation?
Can't wait to drive down and visit you guys once season is in full swing  ;D
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Squam256 on December 26, 2018, 07:03:30 PM
Thanks Alex! Anything I can do to remedy or help the situation?
Can't wait to drive down and visit you guys once season is in full swing  ;D

Horticultural oils usualy eliminate those types of pest relatively quickly. However, there is some tiny ant species which also appears to feed on the leaves (not tending aphids or anything.....actually feeding on the leaves) and oil sprays seem to be ineffective against these.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: dross99_si on December 27, 2018, 06:11:55 AM
Thanks for the info!
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Orkine on December 29, 2018, 05:51:50 PM
I dont know what I need to do to fix this.

These are grafts on a recently top-worked tree.
The grafts took but the growth is anemic at best.  The leaves are tiny and even when there has been a second flush it sits right on the first making it look more like a rose than a mango (see fourth and fifth picture).

Should I feed this plant Nitrogen, it needs to grow.
I have or can get fertilizer with minors if that is what this baby needs.

(https://thumb.ibb.co/msGyxU/IMG_20180920_191702934.jpg) (https://ibb.co/msGyxU) (https://thumb.ibb.co/dpK7rp/IMG_20180920_191710775.jpg) (https://ibb.co/dpK7rp) (https://thumb.ibb.co/cycGj9/IMG_20180920_191713165.jpg) (https://ibb.co/cycGj9) (https://thumb.ibb.co/ffRnrp/IMG_20180920_191716615_BURST000_COVER_TOP.jpg) (https://ibb.co/ffRnrp) (https://thumb.ibb.co/byCSrp/IMG_20180920_191719308.jpg) (https://ibb.co/byCSrp)


This is my most recent graft on the same stump and the first flush here look more normal.  The blue dots are from a recent spray of copper.

(https://thumb.ibb.co/b7T0Bp/IMG_20180920_191659491.jpg) (https://ibb.co/b7T0Bp)

In case it is relevant, I don't irrigate or fertilize my lawn - which comes right up next to the tree.  I use a mulching mower to the grass clipping return to the soil.


It has been 3 months since this post and the plant nooks no different.
I want this plant to come back and want to put it on some regime for next season.
I will take very specific suggestions.
So far, I plan on fertilizing, including with nitrogen, once the cold passes.
I will test the soil to confirm that calcium is needed.
I will keep the plant warm through the winter.

Anything else?
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Frog Valley Farm on December 30, 2018, 06:33:50 AM
I dont know what I need to do to fix this.

These are grafts on a recently top-worked tree.
The grafts took but the growth is anemic at best.  The leaves are tiny and even when there has been a second flush it sits right on the first making it look more like a rose than a mango (see fourth and fifth picture).

Should I feed this plant Nitrogen, it needs to grow.
I have or can get fertilizer with minors if that is what this baby needs.

(https://thumb.ibb.co/msGyxU/IMG_20180920_191702934.jpg) (https://ibb.co/msGyxU) (https://thumb.ibb.co/dpK7rp/IMG_20180920_191710775.jpg) (https://ibb.co/dpK7rp) (https://thumb.ibb.co/cycGj9/IMG_20180920_191713165.jpg) (https://ibb.co/cycGj9) (https://thumb.ibb.co/ffRnrp/IMG_20180920_191716615_BURST000_COVER_TOP.jpg) (https://ibb.co/ffRnrp) (https://thumb.ibb.co/byCSrp/IMG_20180920_191719308.jpg) (https://ibb.co/byCSrp)


This is my most recent graft on the same stump and the first flush here look more normal.  The blue dots are from a recent spray of copper.

(https://thumb.ibb.co/b7T0Bp/IMG_20180920_191659491.jpg) (https://ibb.co/b7T0Bp)

In case it is relevant, I don't irrigate or fertilize my lawn - which comes right up next to the tree.  I use a mulching mower to the grass clipping return to the soil.


It has been 3 months since this post and the plant nooks no different.
I want this plant to come back and want to put it on some regime for next season.
I will take very specific suggestions.
So far, I plan on fertilizing, including with nitrogen, once the cold passes.
I will test the soil to confirm that calcium is needed.
I will keep the plant warm through the winter.

Anything else?

A constantly mowed lawn is an unfortunate environment for growing your Mango tree.  Your grass clippings are not enough to sustain the correct soil biology for growing trees, grass clippings are excellent for feeding bacteria but not for feeding the fungi in the rhizosphere. Roots in the ground (grass) are an excellent home for fungal dominant soil life, but consistently mowing grass compacts the soil, changes the ph and inhibits soil biology and plant growth.  If you cannot let your grass and weeds grow long then at least mulch a perimeter around the tree with wood chips and add some earthworm castings every other week, drench with em1 followed with an indigenous microorganism compost tea to kickstart the natural process of nutrient cycling which will feed soil life, prompt plant growth and promote health.  Of course if your feeding with plant soluble fertilizers this wont work.  Good luck.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on January 03, 2019, 09:34:08 AM
It has been 3 months since this post and the plant nooks no different.
I want this plant to come back and want to put it on some regime for next season.
I will take very specific suggestions.
So far, I plan on fertilizing, including with nitrogen, once the cold passes.
I will test the soil to confirm that calcium is needed.
I will keep the plant warm through the winter.

Anything else?

Highly recommend Keyplex 350DP as a spray and/or soil drench.  If you do a foliar spray be sure to add a non-ionic surfactant to the mix.  Works wonders and is a Florida product.  Find a rep.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on January 03, 2019, 09:37:22 AM
Of course if your feeding with plant soluble fertilizers this wont work.  Good luck.

Sure it will.  Soluble fertilizers are a big boost to microbial health/production in the soil.  Just ask our commercial avocado guru Carlos.  He did a bonafide scientific study on the subject and busted that "organic" myth once and for all.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Frog Valley Farm on January 03, 2019, 12:38:40 PM
Of course if your feeding with plant soluble fertilizers this wont work.  Good luck.

Sure it will.  Soluble fertilizers are a big boost to microbial health/production in the soil.  Just ask our commercial avocado guru Carlos.  He did a bonafide scientific study on the subject and busted that "organic" myth once and for all.

Sure you can use soluble fertilizers but when you do this it affects the entire natural nutrient cycling process, specifically by starving the endophytic mychorizal fungi in the rhizospere.  Mychorizal fungi can excrete substances that will fight disease ward off insect herbivores and excrete plant growth hormones along with numerous other plant beneficial processes.  Most people are aware that plants fed soluble fertilizer are prone to disease and insect attack. This is not myth, it is scientifically proven.

https://www.rootrescue.com/site/mycorrhizal-science (https://www.rootrescue.com/site/mycorrhizal-science)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: hawkfish007 on January 03, 2019, 03:54:45 PM
My Alphonso has a resident grasshopper, I see it on the branch everyday rain or shine. That spot was used to be occupied by a praying mantis before the grasshopper took over. I haven't seen any visible damages to the trunk, branches or any leaves. Wondering why it choose this Alphonso? I have a larger Alphonso in 15 gallon pot.


(https://i.postimg.cc/YLxWmCsq/IMG-0368.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/YLxWmCsq)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on January 04, 2019, 11:34:07 AM
Of course if your feeding with plant soluble fertilizers this wont work.  Good luck.

Sure it will.  Soluble fertilizers are a big boost to microbial health/production in the soil.  Just ask our commercial avocado guru Carlos.  He did a bonafide scientific study on the subject and busted that "organic" myth once and for all.

Sure you can use soluble fertilizers but when you do this it affects the entire natural nutrient cycling process, specifically by starving the endophytic mychorizal fungi in the rhizospere.  Mychorizal fungi can excrete substances that will fight disease ward off insect herbivores and excrete plant growth hormones along with numerous other plant beneficial processes.  Most people are aware that plants fed soluble fertilizer are prone to disease and insect attack. This is not myth, it is scientifically proven.

https://www.rootrescue.com/site/mycorrhizal-science (https://www.rootrescue.com/site/mycorrhizal-science)

I have a 20 acre farm and have literally planted 10,000 trees (fruit, nut, shade, olives, evergreens, etc.) by hand including maintaining a large productive greenhouse of tropical fruit trees and a vineyard.  EVERY one of those plantings were treated with a myco fungi stuff.   MycoApply Soluble Maxx (ecto and endo) was my go to.  Lots of N foods too - I am a N freak when comes to plant foods also applying a Polyon 18-4-9 with micros when I do new plants.  It works.  I am not plaqued with insects or disease doing conventional farming.  That's another myth.

My go to now is VAM.   

(https://i.postimg.cc/PPqtF3rp/VAM.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/PPqtF3rp)

(https://i.postimg.cc/VdJxC3kR/Polyonsend.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/VdJxC3kR)

(https://i.postimg.cc/v127fSBr/Wide-Angle-Trees.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/v127fSBr)

(https://i.postimg.cc/BPT1Yhqw/Tannat-Harvest-Aug19.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/BPT1Yhqw)

No offense man but please don't preach to me about the value of "organics" and all that other "natural" crap or I'll take out my glyphosate pen and let ya have it.  ;D

Here's a partial view of 14 acres of legumes/green manures on my farm - yellow sweet clover, hairy vetch, elbon rye.
 
(https://i.postimg.cc/2qHpvmh0/Snoball-House-Rye.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/2qHpvmh0)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Frog Valley Farm on January 04, 2019, 12:21:08 PM
Did you see the study that show plants that cycle their own nutrients have a higher brix reading than plants fed soluble fertilizers?  LOL
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on January 04, 2019, 02:38:26 PM
Did you see the study that show plants that cycle their own nutrients have a higher brix reading than plants fed soluble fertilizers?  LOL

Ask the Dutch and their mega greenhouses regarding hydroponic gardening.........  https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/09/holland-agriculture-sustainable-farming/ (https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/09/holland-agriculture-sustainable-farming/)

LOL
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on January 04, 2019, 02:52:36 PM
Gonna have to agree with Mark in Texas.

To get higher brix, ensure proper level of calcium.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Frog Valley Farm on January 04, 2019, 03:05:16 PM
Mark I am so glad that you have such success with your farm, the pictures show the hard work you have done and your farm looks incredible.

Do to concerns with my health and concerns about the agricultural runoff affecting so many things detrimentally here in florida, I chose to farm another way.  I use a Regenerative farming system that is closed loop. All fertility and pest and disease management is created within my farm. Fortunately I don’t have any issues at the time.  It is also helpful that I can get a premium for what I grow.  Unfortunately there is zero information available on farming tropical fruits this way in Florida, zero.  I would like to provide a little bit of information via this forum to like minded people.  I am truly sorry if this bothers, please believe me when I say that it is not my intention.

Please allow me to offer my experience, hassle free, to other like minded growers.  Again I am truly sorry if I’ve offended you.


Thank you
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Frog Valley Farm on January 04, 2019, 04:10:05 PM
Gonna have to agree with Mark in Texas.

To get higher brix, ensure proper level of calcium.

Yes thankfully calcium is one thing Florida has plenty of, at least at my farm. 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on January 04, 2019, 05:32:52 PM
That's not necessarily true though. For the folks living in Homestead, there is obviously no need to provide supplemental calcium. However, individuals growing on sand or compost can benefit from supplemental calcium. Also, providing supplemental potassium (regardless of source, be it organic or conventional) can cause ca deficiency.

Gonna have to agree with Mark in Texas.

To get higher brix, ensure proper level of calcium.

Yes thankfully calcium is one thing Florida has plenty of, at least at my farm.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: sammmy on January 04, 2019, 08:30:28 PM
There is no evidence that organic practices improve the quality of produce. 

Well, except for the type of junk-science propaganda seen below - probably funded by George Soros and the granola crowd.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20359265 (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20359265)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on January 05, 2019, 07:30:33 AM
There is no evidence that organic practices improve the quality of produce. 

Well, except for the type of junk-science propaganda seen below - probably funded by George Soros and the granola crowd.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20359265 (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20359265)

This whole "organic", "natural", "gluten free", "non-GMO" stuff is nothing more than a racket.  I checked out our new Natural Grocers store the other day.  The produce, labels propaganda and outrageous prices was laughable.  I wouldn't buy that stuff if you paid me.  Give me conventional grown produce and meats any day. 

Frog Valley Farm, no offense taken.  Was just yanking your chain.  I really don't care how you farm.  What you've written suggests you're not infringing on anyone's rights or health and are a good steward of environment.  That's what counts.

Back to mangos......

I won't mention any names but Florida has a few VERY large mango commercial farmers selling fine looking and delicious mangos that are protected from disease problems via the use of copper fungicides and chemicals that I even use on the vineyard such as Pristine.   One fine pesticide is imidacloprid.  It is extremely cost efficient, effective, and safe if you follow the label directions.  This $26 bag would take care of all the farmers around Naples for a year.
https://www.amazon.com/Adonis-contains-Imidacloprid-2-25-ADONIS/dp/B0195V1MD8/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1546691129&sr=8-3&keywords=adonis+75+wsp (https://www.amazon.com/Adonis-contains-Imidacloprid-2-25-ADONIS/dp/B0195V1MD8/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1546691129&sr=8-3&keywords=adonis+75+wsp)

And for mites in all stages of developments and white fly control you can't beat Forbid 4F.  It is not a poison FWIW.  Then there's my go-to - Bonide All Season Horticultural Spray.  Be sure to shake the bottle before pouring.  Most forget to and that includes me.  It has an emulsifiying agent that is very important to incorporate into your mix.  I use it on citrus, mangos, annonas, avocados.
 
 
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Mark in Texas on January 05, 2019, 07:31:43 AM
Last but not least, do a tissue analysis to see where you stand regarding plant nutrition.  I read my plants and correct accordingly.  Like this Reed avocado which grew from a frozen stump last January to 10' X 10' in 7 mos.  Food?  Polyon with rainwater, mulched heavily.  Nothing else - no sprays.

(https://i.postimg.cc/qN3ZkCpX/John-Lennonsshades-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/qN3ZkCpX)

(https://i.postimg.cc/7JSfHVQr/Reed-Oct28-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/7JSfHVQr)
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Cookie Monster on January 05, 2019, 09:50:22 AM
I use Pristine on my mangoes as well, in a rotation with a couple of others. It's on the EPA's "Reduced Risk" list. Good stuff.
Title: Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
Post by: Guanabanus on January 07, 2019, 10:38:33 PM