Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers

Tropical Fruit => Tropical Fruit Discussion => Topic started by: PlantHoarder on October 15, 2019, 07:41:18 AM

Title: Spice plants
Post by: PlantHoarder on October 15, 2019, 07:41:18 AM
Presently I am growing 2 All spice trees and 1 cinnamon tree (indoors of course).
I'm new to tropical plants and new to this board.

Too early to tell if i'll be successful but the All spice has been in my care for 3 months, hasn't died yet.

The ceylon tree is very young, maybe 6 inches tall and quite frail. The all spice are quite well developed, at nearly 30 inches tall.
Title: Re: Spice plants
Post by: Oolie on October 15, 2019, 09:07:50 AM
Welcome to the forum.

If you have an available frost-free space outside, the Allspice should do well. I love its fragrance.
Title: Re: Spice plants
Post by: Jack, Nipomo on October 15, 2019, 09:19:56 AM
I've had several Allspice trees/shrubs outside here and never had any damage from frost/freezing.  They have certainly been hardy down to 26 degrees with adequate soil/air moisture.
Title: Re: Spice plants
Post by: PlantHoarder on October 15, 2019, 02:18:04 PM
I've had several Allspice trees/shrubs outside here and never had any damage from frost/freezing.  They have certainly been hardy down to 26 degrees with adequate soil/air moisture.

Unfortunately I live near the Canadian boarder in a ski area, it's prone to severe cold snaps of 5-10 degrees and sometimes in the negatives with the average being in the 20's. I tried growing some types of citrus that claimed to tolerate down to the 20's or high 10's. They died when temps sustained 30 F and below for a prolonged period with a all time seasonal low of 16.

The conditions during the warm months are almost tropical with typical seasonal highs of 80 plus in the day and sometimes 60+ at night with rainy trends. The warm months are too short to attempt bananas outdoors, I just rescued my outdoor blue java banana plant that was really happy out there with a big rootball, some early frost that dropped the night time temps down to 28 had ruined all the growth it had achieved starting in late spring. It's base is almost too large to repot.

I tried starfruit too, despite being grown indoors the indoor temp and my ineptitude proved too stressful for it, so it died a few months after I got it.

I have a carnivorous plant starter pot on a whim, and also because of the issue of these pots attracting flying pests. It's a cape sundew.
Title: Re: Spice plants
Post by: Tropheus76 on October 15, 2019, 02:28:02 PM
British Columbia? I didn't know we had zone 8 that far north. I keep two All spice, neither are very tall in fact one took decent damage from a cold spell a couple winters ago, the other was a bit more protected by the same oak trees that have probably kept it at a smaller size lol. Never tried cinnamon, I heard the process for actually getting the spice was a PITA.
Title: Re: Spice plants
Post by: Francis_Eric on October 15, 2019, 04:39:03 PM
I've had several Allspice trees/shrubs outside here and never had any damage from frost/freezing.  They have certainly been hardy down to 26 degrees with adequate soil/air moisture.

Unfortunately I live near the Canadian boarder in a ski area, it's prone to severe cold snaps of 5-10 degrees and sometimes in the negatives with the average being in the 20's. I tried growing some types of citrus that claimed to tolerate down to the 20's or high 10's. They died when temps sustained 30 F and below for a prolonged period with a all time seasonal low of 16.

The conditions during the warm months are almost tropical with typical seasonal highs of 80 plus in the day and sometimes 60+ at night with rainy trends. The warm months are too short to attempt bananas outdoors, I just rescued my outdoor blue java banana plant that was really happy out there with a big rootball, some early frost that dropped the night time temps down to 28 had ruined all the growth it had achieved starting in late spring. It's base is almost too large to repot.

I tried starfruit too, despite being grown indoors the indoor temp and my ineptitude proved too stressful for it, so it died a few months after I got it.

I have a carnivorous plant starter pot on a whim, and also because of the issue of these pots attracting flying pests. It's a cape sundew.
Not tropical, but
You could try appalachian allspice Lindera Benzoin (native To Eastern USA)
It may grow a bit aggressive out doors I heard Edges of forest clearings

I Have not tried to experiment with the berries yet except eating whole, but do have some
Title: Re: Spice plants
Post by: Francis_Eric on October 15, 2019, 04:41:07 PM
I could let you know if I experiment if you'd like me to.

----------------------( Quote from Here )
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Lindera+benzoin

The young leaves, twigs and fruit contain an aromatic essential oil and make a very fragrant tea[55, 62, 95, 102, 149, 183]. The twigs are best gathered when in flower as the nectar adds considerably to the flavour[183]. The dried and powdered fruit is used as a substitute for the spice ‘allspice’[2, 46, 55, 62, 95, 183]. The fruit is about the size of an olive[245]. The leaves can also be used as a spice substitute[55]. The new bark is pleasant to chew[183].

Spice bush has a wide range of uses as a household remedy, especially in the treatment of colds, dysentery and intestinal parasites[222, 238]. It warrants scientific investigation[222]. The bark is aromatic, astringent, diaphoretic, febrifuge, stimulant and tonic[61, 149, 227, 257]. It is pleasant to chew[227]. It is used in the treatment of coughs and colds[257]. The bark can be harvested at any time of the year and is used fresh or dried[238]. The fruits are carminative[222]. The oil from the fruits has been used in the treatment of bruises and rheumatism[222]. A tea made from the twigs was a household remedy for colds, fevers, worms and colic[222]. A steam bath of the twigs is used to cause perspiration in order to ease aches and pains in the body[257]. The young shoots are harvested during the spring and can be used fresh or dried[238]. The bark is diaphoretic and vermifuge. It was once widely used as a treatment for typhoid fevers and other forms of fevers[213, 222].



The leaves contain small quantities of camphor and can be used as an insect repellent and disinfectant[169]. An oil with a lavender-like fragrance is obtained from the leaves[245]. The fruit, upon distillation, yield a spice-scented oil resembling camphor[245]. An oil smelling of wintergreen is obtained from the twigs and bark[245].

Title: Re: Spice plants
Post by: Francis_Eric on October 15, 2019, 05:23:27 PM
You can try some berries here if you decide you want to grow them
(Chris is nice too the founder of pawpaw fest You can get Pawpaw pulp there also)
I do know the quality of the berries, and they taste good
I do not know the quality of the pawpaw fruit as mine de thawed , and fermented because I was traveling.
https://integrationacres.com/products/appalachian-allspice-p-42.html


The Jelly they sell has a Mulled cider taste to it
I am not crazy over it
it uses Spice bush in it.
Title: Re: Spice plants
Post by: pineislander on October 15, 2019, 05:54:10 PM
I don't have Allspice yet but have Ceylon Cinnamon, Bay Rum and Lemon Bay Rum, Curry leaf, Jamaican Mint, and herbs like Rosemary, Oregano, Basil and Spearmint.
Title: Re: Spice plants
Post by: murahilin on October 16, 2019, 02:10:23 AM
British Columbia? I didn't know we had zone 8 that far north. I keep two All spice, neither are very tall in fact one took decent damage from a cold spell a couple winters ago, the other was a bit more protected by the same oak trees that have probably kept it at a smaller size lol. Never tried cinnamon, I heard the process for actually getting the spice was a PITA.

I think the OP may be from Washington state. I didn't realize they had zone 8 that far north either so I looked at the USDA map for Washington and surprisingly some parts of the state are even Zone 9a!

https://www.plantmaps.com/interactive-washington-usda-plant-zone-hardiness-map.php (https://www.plantmaps.com/interactive-washington-usda-plant-zone-hardiness-map.php)