Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers

Tropical Fruit => Tropical Fruit Discussion => Topic started by: JoeP450 on March 07, 2012, 05:12:25 PM

Title: Cereus peruvianus var. Monstrose
Post by: JoeP450 on March 07, 2012, 05:12:25 PM
Today I noticed my friend's neighbor was growing C. peruvianus var. Monstrose. Since I keep a pair of clippers in the trunk, I asked the owner for a cutting and she kindly obliged. I'm going to let the cutting sit out in the sun for a bit so the wound will scab over and then plant it. I have always wanted one of these and no clue where to buy one, stoked! Here is a link with a monstrose with fruit: http://cactiguide.com/cactus/?genus=Cereus&species=peruvianus (http://cactiguide.com/cactus/?genus=Cereus&species=peruvianus)

(http://s13.postimage.org/zdem8pxyr/Monstrose.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/zdem8pxyr/)

Anyone know where I can get Sternocereus Gummosa?

_JoeP450
Title: Re: Cereus peruvianus var. Monstrose
Post by: nullzero on March 07, 2012, 05:45:11 PM
Nice cutting, I am growing Cerus peruvianus var. Monstrose, the cutting I have should of rooted by now (received it from a kind AZ person). The monstrose forms seem to produce large fruit.

As for Stenocereus gummosus, its very hard to find a source for. Luckily I have a small plant, however its very slow growing and I can't take extra cuttings yet. I intend to graft smaller sections to faster growing cactus rootstock. So you can get back to me in 6 months or so, when I can confirm that the grafts have taken and the new growth is emerging.

Stenocereus gummosus, called "Pitaya Agria" in Meixco. The fruit is reported to be one of the tastiest cactus fruits.
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-RcxIO_bMQLA/T1O5CBqZvWI/AAAAAAAACJc/SOF-qYUHNGc/s400/P1030713.JPG)
Title: Re: Cereus peruvianus var. Monstrose
Post by: Pancrazio on March 07, 2012, 05:57:43 PM
. I'm going to let the cutting sit out in the sun for a bit so the wound will scab over and then plant it.

Dunno about your climate, but i own quite some cactus, ad usually when i want to root cuttings i let them dry for a month in a light shadow. Full sun usually can dry smallest one too quickly, wich can slow the development of roots. Full shadow instead can be detrimental ro the drying of the cut, and can promote the growt of the cutting "out of the soil" with bad results.
After a month i put them in pure sand, and i water them very ligthly, maybe once every few weeks (the quantity of water that can be dried in a day). The water, if very moderate, can promote the growth of roots. Too much water instead will bring the plant to rot.
They usually root in the following weeks.