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Messages - jcaldeira

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1
He is probably referring to the Cornish x Rock crosses used for meat birds. I raised 30 of these last year. They will eat themselves to death if you leave food in front of them. And they don't like scavaging for food as much as other breeds from what I've read.

Cornish-Rock meat birds will not eat themselves to death.  In fact, the normal procedure raising them is to have food available to them 24/7.  Some will become so heavy that they can't walk properly, but they won't die from overeating.
You're wrong. And tons of information on the net will prove it. These crosses are bread to eat continuously so they will reach market faster and at lower cost. The problem arises when there hearts can't keep up with the amount of weight their bodies are packing. A lot of these die from heart failure or heat exhaustion due to this bulking process. I also lost some because of this.

You must be keeping them past the 6 weeks or so intended for broilers. 

Cornish-Rock crosses are broiler chickens - meant to be harvested at 4-8 weeks max.   During this time, the standard practice is to give them free access to a high-protein feed 24/7.   If there were significant deaths during the raising it would not be profitable to do this.

After the broiler stage, you're probably right about health issues being problematic.

2
He is probably referring to the Cornish x Rock crosses used for meat birds. I raised 30 of these last year. They will eat themselves to death if you leave food in front of them. And they don't like scavaging for food as much as other breeds from what I've read.

Cornish-Rock meat birds will not eat themselves to death.  In fact, the normal procedure raising them is to have food available to them 24/7.  Some will become so heavy that they can't walk properly, but they won't die from overeating.

3
There are a lot of good pineapple varieties, but I'd stay away from Smooth Cayenne.  They're big and nice looking, but they taste as if they're rotting prematurely.  It's the 'tang' in the flavor that reminds me of fermentation.

4
Chickens enjoy papaya quite a bit, too.

5
Citrus General Discussion / Rootstock Sucker Madness
« on: April 13, 2014, 11:10:41 PM »
I recently pruned the lower branches off many of my citrus trees, and now I'm plagued with shoots coming out of the rootstocks.  Is there a good way to reduce the number of rootstock suckers that a plant generates?  How long with this plague last?

I only cut off the braches low to the ground to keep fruit off the ground, facilitate cutting grass and reducing mosquito habitat.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Citrus Sub Forum???
« on: April 13, 2014, 07:34:44 PM »
A citrus subforum is a great idea.   As a member of the dying Citrus Growers Forum, I am sad to see it go. 

John

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Name my farm
« on: April 12, 2014, 11:40:29 AM »
I believe your name is related to the english Cauldron, which ultimately derives from Latin Caldarium for cooking pot and Calidus for hot.  Perhaps a play on that? Can capture your name, heat and food all at once.

The Caldarium
Calidus Fruits


Yes, "Caldeira" is a french word originated in latin word "caldaria", it means something like cooking pot, but it looks like in France it is used more as geology-volcanology term:
http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caldeira

but I have to agree with those, who intend to use the word "Fiji" in the name, for me as inhabitant of central Europe it sounds exotic  and immediately pictures of sun, ocean and palms come to mind.


Caldeira is a Portuguese name.

"Fiji" will definitely be on my product labels, but probably not the farm name and farm sign because it doesn't sound good locally.   I've decided against using "Volivoli" in the name since the word also means "shopping" (in addition to "trading"). 

For now I'm sticking with "Ra Fruit & Honey Farm" if I am allowed to register than name, and adding my own name to labels to emphasize pride in ownership.  For example,  my labels to  read "John's Ra Honey" as it does now, "John's Ra Guava Jam", etc.  Ra has a good reputation within Fiji for producing high quality honey and it is one of the more beautiful places in Fiji, so that image is ideal.   The name is descriptive without being too restrictive in scope.

Thanks, everyone, for the ideas.  There were some good ones. 

8
If the early fruiting is consistent and can be replicated, as good science demands, this is indeed interesting.  However, if only one out of the 265 space seeds flowered early I'm not very excited.  I've had a few citrus seedlings flower in the first year.  It occasionally happens.  They rarely hold the fruit.



Meanwhile, the rest of space-traveling cherry pits were planted in Kochi Prefecture in south-western Japan and Yamanashi in central Japan, and they have already come into bloom as well.


If I am reading the article right, it says all of them bloomed as well planted in another part of Japan, woohoo! 265/265 is pretty impressive!


You read the article correctly, but it is inconsistent with other reports on these seeds:

http://japandailypress.com/cherry-tree-from-space-blooms-early-japanese-scientists-baffled-1147159/
"To top it off, the Ganjoji temple sapling is not alone in this phenomenon – four other “space cherry trees” have blossomed early."

http://news.discovery.com/space/cherry-blossom-grown-from-space-seeds-a-little-weird-140411.htm
"Of the 14 locations in which the pits were replanted, blossoms have been spotted at four places."

http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2011_species.html
"Most wild trees, but also a lot of cultivated tree varieties, have blossoms with five petals. However, some species have blossoms which consist of ten, twenty or more petals. Trees with blossoms of more than five petals are called yaezakura."

Does anyone here know how common early flowering is in cherry tree seedings?  It seems we would want to compare the percentage of the 'space seeds' that flowered after four years to the percentage of normal seeds that flower within the same time.



9
If the early fruiting is consistent and can be replicated, as good science demands, this is indeed interesting.  However, if only one out of the 265 space seeds flowered early I'm not very excited.  I've had a few citrus seedlings flower in the first year.  It occasionally happens.  They rarely hold the fruit.


10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Refractometer recommendations
« on: April 10, 2014, 01:03:17 AM »
A garlic crusher is effective for extracting a few drops from many fruit.

Last year I read a website about measuring oil content in avocado by dehydrating the flesh and measuring the remaining solids and oil.   I wonder if a similar method could be used to compare sugar content in fruits, since sugars are solids and won't evaporate out.  It wouldn't yield a BRIX number without calibration, but would be useful when comparing cultivars of a fruit.

11
There are many flowers that honey bees will not work for nectar or pollen.  Some flowers are shaped such that the bees' tongue can't reach the nectar.  Others don't produce a sweet enough nectar to attract them.   I don't know of any red colored flower that honey bees will work.

Regarding moving bee hives, the old saying is "three feet or three miles', meaning either move the hive less than 3 feet each day or more than 3 miles, because if the hive is moved less than 3 miles many of the field bees will go back to their old location.

Pollination of mango should not be a problem unless there are so many trees all blooming at the same time that the natural pollinators can't keep up.  In that case, I think something like Richard Campbell is doing makes sense:  The wild bee colonies (not honey bees) will 'build up' on flowers blooming before the mango, so there are abundant pollinators when mango comes into bloom.

12
I keep honey bees and have never seen a honey be on a mango blossom. 

I doubt that Richard Campbell's cutting of the nettles improves mango pollination from honey bees.  If anything, it's forcing other pollinators such as smaller wild bees to work the mango.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Refractometer recommendations
« on: April 09, 2014, 11:42:00 AM »
Be sure to buy a refractometer that is suited to the range of sugars you are trying to measure.  There are so many different ranges sold.  For instance, a refractometer sold for measuring honey is calibrated to measure sugars between 75% and 88% (approx.), whereas one for sugar cane might measure sugars of 5%-18%.  The cheapest handheld ones are hard to read unless you're in sunlight or near a strong lamp.

14
Yep, bird.  Not a rat. 

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Name my farm
« on: April 08, 2014, 10:01:21 AM »
Good suggestions.  A few comments:

Quote
Sega na lega.

Nice, but used already.  Over-used, actually.  For those who don't know, it means 'No Problem' in the Fijian language, Bau dialect.

Quote
Windward - a phrase from Hawaii to describe the portion of the island where the wind comes towards.  The windward side usually has lush vegetation because the clouds must drop rain to clear the mountains.  The opposite side is Leeward.

Not bad, but I'm actually on the lee side of a little peninsula.

Quote
I would say think about who your customers are going to be, and what kinds of names would attract them, or what they would associate the name with?

That's what I meant when I wrote that it should look nice on a jar.  But not just today's customers.  The name must be flexible for the future.

Quote
Are the jars going to be sold locally or internationally?

Locally, but some of it will surely be to overseas visitors.  The word 'Fiji' will appear in the country of origin ('Produce of Fiji') so I don't need that word in the name.  I do that now for my honey, sold under the name 'Ra Fruit & Honey'.  Ra is the district/state.

 

 
Quote
I like the name Volivoli. Has a nice ring to it. How about Volivoli Delights? Or Volivoli Nectar? Volivoli Supreme? Something like that.

I like 'Volivoli' too.

Ideally, the name should be very flexible, as the farm may eventually turn towards tourism, of be subdivided.  I'm leaning towards having the name 'farm' included in the name, so it doesn't sound like a cheap motel.

I love the ideas.  Keep 'em coming!

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Name my farm
« on: April 08, 2014, 12:33:13 AM »
I'm looking for a clever name for my farm.  Any ideas?

The farm is approximately 15 acres, seaside, tropical.  Predominant fruits are mango, citrus and avocado, but growing a little of everything I can find that thrives here.  And honey bees.  Hillside, facing west.  Beautiful view, sunsets. It's near the northernmost point on the island, adjacent to Bligh waters, where Captain Bligh of Bounty fame sailed through after the mutiny. Wildlife includes fruit bats, crabs, mongoose and fish.  The area is known as Volivoli ("trading place").

Edit: It would be best if the name looked nice on a jar of fruit jam or honey.

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Pale Leaf Mystery
« on: April 07, 2014, 09:15:49 PM »
Very interesting.   The Copper and some of the other nutrients may be "tied up" with each other.

That's exactly what the CEO of Fiji's primary fertilizer company is thinking.  He analyzed my soil results and thought that the very high levels of some element(s) are probably tying up the phosphorus, making it unavailable to the trees.  The soil is extremely high in magnesium, iron, manganese and copper.

He recommended I apply a superphosphate fertilizer, and concentrate it in one or two areas under each tree instead of broadcasting it.  He thought that gave a better chance that some would be available to the tree roots.  I had never heard of this way of applying, but he swears it works better than broadcasting in this situation.  I applied the fertilizer this morning and am waiting for rain now.

John

18
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Looking for Dwarf Coconuts
« on: April 06, 2014, 02:51:44 PM »
Have you tried phoning Romney Farms?  Their website recommends phoning before arriving.  Check it out.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Water Requirements for Passion Fruit?
« on: April 04, 2014, 11:29:20 AM »
I have read they grow from cuttings...do you recommend propagating cuttings from the vine every couple years, or planting seeds/buying a new plant every other year?

I've had more success from seeds, though cuttings can be rooted.  Plant the seeds straight away - don't dry them. 

Climate can also influence which passion fruit variety is most productive.  In my tropical lowland wet/dry seasonal climate, the yellow passion fruit bears much heavier than purple.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Water Requirements for Passion Fruit?
« on: April 04, 2014, 10:48:52 AM »
The ideal watering schedule depends on the type of soil as well as natural rainfall.   It would be valuable to learn the moisture retention capabilities of your soil and try to maintain the ideal soil moisture level.   This link contains excellent information on soil moisture:  http://soilwater.com.au/bettersoils/modules.htm

For newly transplanted plants, watering every second day is usually fine, along with shade.  After that, twice a week is fine for a loam soil if there is no rain.  Rain water is usually better than tap water because it usually is more acidic and has no chemical additives.

If watered too often, the vines may develop shallow roots that could be problematic in a drought.

Passion fruit vines are only productive for approximately two years, so plan on planting a couple every year.  They grow huge, 10 meters or more.


21
The weather crazy and intense the past few years? Jeez Laweez!  The weather and intense events have been happening since weather has been documented.  The great hurricanes of Galveston, the Keys, Camille in Mississippi....it goes on and on.....and the fact that the number of tornadoes has been low compared to decades past, the weather and climate is constantly changing and is generally on a roller coaster ride, i live in Florida and we haven't had a hurricane effect me since 2004!  So hurricanes are not on the upswing, they are not more intense than in decades past so the fear mongers cannot explain this...follow the money trail and you will see why the alarmists are at work


Wow, that's some science you're applying here.  The world is a lot bigger than Florida, and there simply aren't enough data points to conclude the rise .
See a trend here?


Here's what the National Oceanic and Atmospheric authority (NOAA) has to say on the subject:

"•It is premature to conclude that human activities--and particularly greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming--have already had a detectable impact on Atlantic hurricane activity. That said, human activities may have already caused changes that are not yet detectable due to the small magnitude of the changes or observational limitations, or are not yet properly modeled (e.g., aerosol effects).

"•Anthropogenic warming by the end of the 21st century will likely cause hurricanes globally to be more intense on average (by 2 to 11% according to model projections for an IPCC A1B scenario). This change would imply an even larger percentage increase in the destructive potential per storm, assuming no reduction in storm size.

"•There are better than even odds that anthropogenic warming over the next century will lead to an increase in the numbers of very intense hurricanes in some basins—an increase that would be substantially larger in percentage terms than the 2-11% increase in the average storm intensity. This increase in intense storm numbers is projected despite a likely decrease (or little change) in the global numbers of all tropical storms.

"•Anthropogenic warming by the end of the 21st century will likely cause hurricanes to have substantially higher rainfall rates than present-day hurricanes, with a model-projected increase of about 20% for rainfall rates averaged within about 100 km of the storm center."


22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Pale Leaf Mystery
« on: April 01, 2014, 05:59:11 PM »
I finally received the soil test results for the 'sick' area of my farm.  Here's what I find:

Available Phosphorus is extremely low.  Ideal is between 20 and 30 mg/kg.  The overall farm is 4.1 (low).  The problem area is 1.0, extremely low, at only 5% of the minimum ideal range.

Copper is extremely high:  Ideal is >0.2 mg/kg.  Overall farm is 0.1 (half the minimum ideal).  The problem area is 4.0.  So it's much, much higher than my overall farm.  The problem area is on an old lava flow, so it could be leaching from the rock. 

pH, nitrogen, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, iron and zinc are all good.  Manganese is very high, but not much different than my overall farm.

Right now I'm leaning towards a phosphorus deficiency, but the leaves on my tree do not match the internet photos for potassium.  Another suspect is copper toxicity. 

A third possibility is that the soil in this area is ideal for some root-rot causing organism.  I'm tempted to dig out a plant to check.  I moved two young affected Malay Apple trees from that area to another and they improved greatly.


23
What will happen to the trees with the effects of global warming?

Significant and rapid climate change will be devastating to many tree species.  Species tend to live in their ideal niche.   They simply tend not to thrive as well when rainfall, temperature, and seasonal changes are contrary to what they are adapted for. 

Many plant species need chilling hours to reproduce, some need droughts, others year-round rainfall.  Change these aspects of their environment and many will die off or need be grown in other areas.

John

24
I'm sorry but hasn't the IPCC been exposed as a fraud?

Quite to the contrary.  Whackos such as the writers at infowars.com, grand conspiracy theorists, and those with moneyed interests in the petroleum industry are the primary people who dismiss IPCC. 

In fact, more than 2,000 scientists from 154 countries typically participate in the IPCC process.  Scientists are nominated for participation in IPCC by their own governments.   Many are the top scientists from many disciplines.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Birds ate my mulberry
« on: March 17, 2014, 12:57:14 AM »
I had a similar problem.   The problem solved itself as the mulberry trees grew larger.  There were too many berries for the birds to eat so I was finally able to harvest big bowls full.

Earlier, I hung bright CDs on a couple of the trees, similar to Christmas ornaments.  It worked well for a few days, but the birds (mynahs) became accustomed to them.  They work for me if I leave them on for 3 days, then off for 3 days.

John

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