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Messages - snowjunky

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 5
1
My Redlands is very vigorous has huge leaves twice the size of all my California white sapote varieties.
Which makes me wonder if the tree is also much bigger than other varieties. 
If so then I have to reconsider it's location.

2
Yeah I taped frost cloth around the base of my papaya plant, but got lazy with the Panama Berry because it's mainly for shade.
I should keep some hay around next winter.

3
My 15ft tall Panama Berry was killed to the ground by a 26F freeze.  Will it regrow from the roots?
If not I will need to replace it because it is used for providing afternoon shade and humidity for other trees in the Phoenix summer.

4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfOxf3CZ6bY
Arizona avocado expert talks to Jake Mace about Aravaipa. 
Skip to the 9:30 mark about how it tastes.

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Longan trees too close, what's next?
« on: January 12, 2020, 08:47:29 PM »
Longan and Lychee and probably many other fruit trees would produce bigger and sweeter fruit if grown close to a river.

6
Starfruits do well here in Phoenix too with a bit of afternoon shade.  I was surprised because the leaves and fruits are kind of delicate and some people only recommend them for containers here for whatever reason.

7
So Bell and B10 have less flavor than SK?

8
Do you like Bell, B10 or Sri Kembangan starfruit better? 
I only have space for one of these.  I like starfruit that has some flavor and sweetness. 
Sri Kembangan is good, but Kari is too soft for me.
I've not tried Bell or B-10.

9
Is Luc's Mexican Garcinia more cold hardy than Imbe?  How about compared to other tropicals?

10
Anyone else?  I would think that there has be larger Luc's growing in SoCal. 

Bill
I grafted one on an Imbe that is in the ground a few years ago, the Luc's is now 6 feet.

Thanks for saying that.  I've been waiting for someone to confirm in another thread that Luc's grafts on imbe.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus sp.) Varieties
« on: December 26, 2019, 05:22:22 PM »
I have an isolated kwai muk tree that produces nice large fruits on its own and gets loaded with fruits.

And tasty too! Awesome.  Thank you for offering the scion wood.
Now I just have to find a seedling and see if Kwai Muk can survive in Phoenix.
Anyone here tried to grow Kwai Muk in Arizona or have any info on this?

12
Never heard of anyone selecting out choice varieties of kwai muk. I have one large tree that produces large fruits that are very tasty. Am willing to send scions to anyone interested. I just planted at a different location a whole row of kwai muk as windbreak. They were from seeds sourced from Florida some years ago from 3 different trees, so hopefully eventually i'll have more to select from and come up with different strains.

Were there other Kwai Muk trees to help pollinate your large fruited tree?  Or did it produce large fruits by self pollinating?
Some sources say cross pollination produces larger and more fruits.

13
Like all other artocarpus, kwai muk have different shaped leaves at different stages of growth, even on the same tree.

Your point is? I am well aware of the intraspecific variation of kwai muk. It's all the same species. But that species is NOT A. hypargyraeus (White kwai muk), which has long peduncles, velvety underside of leaves, male flowers very pale and female flowers white and bumpy. Neither you or anyone else is growing it, though I'd love to be proven wrong. If anyone wants to upload their personal photo of a tree in cultivation, go right ahead.

In sum, the two species are only superficially similar, and that is why they have similar common names. But no one has the real A. hypargyraeus and if you did you would not think they are all the one species of "kwai muk".

First, please don't be offended by my crude humor.  It wasn't aimed at your expense.
I would say that many people here are just hobbyist not botanist, so the most current and accurate botanical name may not be our highest priority.
Using the most familiar name is probably more useful for most people on this forum. 
That being said, your knowledge and contribution on this subject is very much appreciated.
But since the new latin name has not yet been determined, why make a change now.
When the dust settles, please let us know and we can update the thread with the new name and say formerly know as A. hypargyreus.

14
Never heard of anyone selecting out choice varieties of kwai muk. I have one large tree that produces large fruits that are very tasty. Am willing to send scions to anyone interested. I just planted at a different location a whole row of kwai muk as windbreak. They were from seeds sourced from Florida some years ago from 3 different trees, so hopefully eventually i'll have more to select from and come up with different strains.

I have a seedling tree, still smaller than me, so I don't expect a harvest for a long time. That said, I'm keen on trying its own fruit, so I don't wanna top-work it. Can the scions be used as cuttings to root directly? Is there a decent strike rate? I'm interested in some proven good trees myself. Come to think of it... If cuttings were a viable strategy, I could always take cuttings of my current seedling and top-work the proven scions over it, without losing the original... I'm seeing no downside here, though it's contingent on cuttings working well for this species.

You can just graft the variety to a branch instead of top working your seedling, then you'll have both.

15
How about A. hole ... a lot easier to remember.
:D Yes, but you forgot, it has to be in latin?

A. holeo
A. holeus
A. holeus maximus
Take your pick.  Which one sounds latin?  I'm no Einstein.

16
How about A. hole ... a lot easier to remember.

17
Do they freeze well like durian?

18
I can't believe they say Kwai Muk is "Native from Kwangtung, China, to Hong Kong". Kwangtung=Guangdong.  I've never seen this fruit there before.  Plenty of lychees and longans, but wth is a Kwai Muk?

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Most Outrageously Delicious Canistel Ever
« on: November 17, 2019, 02:21:41 AM »
    Oscar

Were you successful in your grafting efforts to add this " Jay Ram " canistel to your collection , and if so how long do you think it would be until bud wood would be available ? Maybe a couple years ?

 William

Yes scions will not be available of this canistel for at least a couple of years.
Oscar,
Have your "Most Outrageously Delicious Canistel Ever" grafts fruited yet?  Do they consistently taste outrageously delicious?  Is scion wood available?  Any info on tree size, vigor and precociousness would be great too, thanks.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Guava from taiwan
« on: November 17, 2019, 01:23:52 AM »
I think maybe Crystal guava from Taiwan is different from Crystal guava from Malaysia or Indonesia. 
Crystal from Malaysia or Indonesia has round leaves.  Crystal Taiwan has normal shaped leaves and is dwarf. 
I think the Crystal from Taiwan is supposed to be tastier and more productive, but is not completely seedless.
Can anyone confirm or refute this?

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Guava from taiwan
« on: November 09, 2019, 03:01:10 PM »
It's the new Peanut Seedless from Thailand.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Guava from taiwan
« on: November 08, 2019, 12:46:58 PM »
Yes, many people and some nurseries say they like Taiwan guava the most.  Thailand also gives us many good tropical fruit cultivars, but the Taiwanese farmers and agriculture scientist are very diligent and innovative.  Maybe they spend more in R&D.

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Guava from taiwan
« on: November 08, 2019, 12:47:49 AM »
Maybe it's the Crystal guava from Taiwan.  It's productive, almost seedless and is dwarf.  Some members say it's the best guava.

24
No they are all different especially if you like guavas.  Taiwan alone has more than 10 commercially important types of guava.  I'm still waiting to find out which variety my "Taiwan" guava that came from FL is.

25
Most of my guava cleft grafts have flattened graft unions, meaning poor graft unions.
Now I prefer bark graft.

Is there a better way than cleft when scion and rootstock thickness is the same?
Flattening cleft unions just means the scion is growing or thickening faster than the rootstock. 
This may be temporary and the union will grow round later when the rootstock catches up.

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