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Messages - brian

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1
Much better than I would have guessed.  GMO is awesome technology.

2
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Sunwest introduces new Mandarin variety
« on: February 11, 2019, 03:07:31 PM »
I saw these in the grocery store today and bought some.  They taste old, like they have been sitting in storage too long.  Not good at all. 

Growers trying to sell premier varieties need to put some kind of controls in place to ensure old product gets pulled.  They are going to kill their reputation because people will try it once, think it is bad, and never try again.  The variance in fruit quality is massive even for single varieties.

3
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Cushiony Cotton scale
« on: January 28, 2019, 12:21:57 PM »
I've applied imidacloprid at the highest listed rate, as a soil drench, to half of my trees.  I removed any fruit from them first. 

The other half I will treat with only soap sprays. 

4
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Cushiony Cotton scale
« on: January 19, 2019, 02:47:45 PM »
I ordered some imidacloprid 21%z, and sprayed soap one more time while I wait for it.  If the scale reappears I will try the pesticide.

5
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Harris variegated minneola tangelo update
« on: January 18, 2019, 11:30:09 PM »
Ah yes I think it was you that described this to me.  My fruit are undersized because the tree was a bit shocked recently.  Iím sure it will produce normal sized fruit in time.  My experience is that all minneolas usually have a neck but it seems a bit random per fruit rather than all same from one tree.

6
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Kumquat varieties update
« on: January 18, 2019, 12:24:44 PM »
I've never heard of a Ichangquat, and I'd be interested in sampling one, but my experience so far with kumquats is that only fukushu, nagami, meiwa, and marumi are worthwhile unless you are specifically looking for extra cold-hardiness and are willing to compromise on taste/seedlessness. 

I believe a seedless fukushu would be the best fruit around.  Nordmann is great but nagamis have a very slight off taste that doesn't appear in fukushu, meiwa, marumi.

Btw, cut up kumquats in vanilla ice cream is amazing.

7
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Sweetest Grapefruit Varieties
« on: January 18, 2019, 12:18:30 PM »
My experience from store-bought grapefruits is that the smaller red ones are the sweetest.  Very sweet, much like an orange but with the grapefruit bitter taste. 

8
Citrus General Discussion / Harris variegated minneola tangelo update
« on: January 18, 2019, 11:24:54 AM »
In another post somebody commented that the my variegated minneola looked like a type that would not produce the desired red-striped fruit, as the foliage is green/light-green instead of green/light-green/white.   My small tree produced three fruits, and none show any red striping.  I don't see any white on the new growth, either.  I suspect it will always be this way so I will dig it up and replace it with the green/light-green/white one that I still have in a container.  Harris sent me two because the first one arrived with heavy shipping damage the second was a replacement.  The first one recovered though so I ended up with two healthy trees, one of each type.


9
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Cushiony Cotton scale
« on: December 30, 2018, 08:34:23 PM »
Thank you.  I am going to order this right now.  Lately I feel like Iím cultivating scale instead of fruit.

EDIT - the top google result for imidicloprid cottony cushion scale specifically says it doesnít work on CCS. I think this is why I never tried it.  I canít find any chemical control listed for CCS.  Everything just says use smothering sprays (which do not eradicate) and vedalia beetles (which arenít available)

10
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Cushiony Cotton scale
« on: December 30, 2018, 05:45:09 PM »
I have been battling the same CCS infestation for years.   I can control them but I cannot seem to eliminate them.   If I spray it kills them but more come back within a couple weeks.  My trees are in a greenhouse and CCS doesnít live in this area so itís not a reinfestation from outside.  I have tried ladybugs three or four times and they did not help at all.  The ladybugs sold online are NOT the famous vedalia beetles and do not seem to eat the scale.  I have looked extensively for a mail order source of vedalia beetles and found none.  If anybody knows one I would love to know.

The best spray I have found is soapy water.  I am using ďdr bronners pure unscented castile soapĒ as it has no detergents.  I tried dormant oil (Bonide) also but I believe I mixed it way too strongly as it completely defoliated my guava and injured some other trees.  I have never had any issues with soap.  This was when I was messing with hose-end sprayers.  Iíve given up on hose end sprayers after trying three types and even customizing them.  They just donít seem to work.

Spraying is such a chore for me that I am currently building a custom sprayer to make spraying the underside of leaves easier.

I would gladly use any number of chemicals to eradicate this infestation.  I am okay if it means not eating any fruit for some time.  If anybody has suggestions Iíd love to hear them.  What pesticides are recommended for CCS? 

11
Citrus General Discussion / Re: What citrus would you plant?
« on: December 20, 2018, 10:01:12 AM »
Bearss is definitely the best lime.  I'm getting rid of all my other limes and keeping the Bearss. 

12
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Kumquat varieties update
« on: December 11, 2018, 09:33:40 AM »
Its kumquat season again for me.   Not much has changed.  I still think the Indio Mardarinquats and Centennial variegated are far inferior to the nagami/marumi/meiwa types.  The nordman nagamis and fukushu are still great.   I didn't get much marumi or meiwa as the trees have been unhealthy.  Hopefully they'll bounce back soon. 

13
I have a 75k modine hot dawg.  I actually have another backup one I havenít installed yet.  Plus four ďmr heaterĒ screw-onto-20lb-grill-tank heaters as emergency backups that require no electricity.

I have a battery powered radio thermometer alarm, and an internet enabled alarm that sends text messages. 

I think having redundancy and backup plans is better than relying on a single unit

14
Citrus General Discussion / Re: twig dieback with gum at branch crooks
« on: November 13, 2018, 02:44:50 PM »
I ordered some more.   FYI its now called "Garden Phos" and no longer Agri-Fos

15
Citrus General Discussion / Re: twig dieback with gum at branch crooks
« on: November 13, 2018, 02:30:20 PM »
I just noticed all the replies to this thread.  I discovered I actaully have a few other trees that have the same symptoms.  I have some Agri-Fos that is probably four years old - does it go bad? 

16
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Winter Feeding of citrus
« on: November 12, 2018, 11:42:11 AM »
Brian, I doubt that the high humidity in your greenhouse has anything to do with your tree problem.   Humidity in my greenhouse, especially during the winter months sometimes causes "rain" to fall from the glazing.  On warmish days I turn on the exhaust fans to reduce the humidity.  However, over the 30 years I've had the greenhouse, I have never had a problem.  In Florida during the summer many days the humidity is 100 percent.  On Okinawa, when I was in the Navy, the humidity was near 100 percent the entire summer, no problem with the citrus.

Did you mean to respond to me other thread regarding the gummy areas near twig dieback?  If so thank you for the information, I have always worried about humidity and it is good to know it can be tolerable.

17
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Winter Feeding of citrus
« on: November 11, 2018, 07:50:35 PM »
Laaz do you water the container trees you overwinter in Your garage?  Or do you let them dry out?

18
Citrus General Discussion / twig dieback with gum at branch crooks
« on: November 03, 2018, 10:19:39 AM »
One of my fukushu kumquats has experienced signficant twig dieback in the past month or two.   This is the largest one I have, and the only kumquat I've planted in-ground in my greenhouse.  I noticed when cutting off the dead branches and inspecting the damage that there are blobs of gum at joints of the dead branches.  I've never seen this before, does this indicate anything out of the ordinary or is thjis common with twig dieback issues?

Now, I suspected the cause for the dieback was a rather severe cottony cushion scale infestation that I let go on too long while I fiddled with hose-end sprayers (I ultumately gave up and went back to a pre-mixed pump sprayer).   Its also possible that this is somehow related to the clay soil the tree is planted in, or the high humidity of the greenhouse.  However none of my other 40+ trees have this symptom, and many of them were infested with the same scale and sprayed for it at the same times. 

The kumquat is from Fourwinds, not sure which rootstock they used for kumquats.



19
Citrus General Discussion / Re: New addition
« on: November 01, 2018, 10:53:59 PM »
Looks really nice.

Is that the knockoff rootmaker roll material?  How does it hold up?  I saw it years ago when it was only available on Alibaba and it wasnít straightforward to order direct.  Whereíd you find it?

20
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Fast flowering in citrus seedlings
« on: November 01, 2018, 10:48:40 PM »
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=21243.msg260001#msg260001

Hereís the thread with the article.  I suspect this type of hack is the future of selective breeding

21
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Fast flowering in citrus seedlings
« on: November 01, 2018, 10:43:08 PM »
Iíve always been interested in this but I speculated there must be a way to cheat and induce maturity into an immature seedling.  If I remember correctly scientists in Spain did just that using CRISPR.  That was the last I heard of it, and they didnít respond when I asked for more information. 

22
Citrus General Discussion / Re: HELP! Root Rot
« on: October 24, 2018, 02:28:31 AM »
Of the trees I've owned that had severe dieback, about half died and the other half bounced back and are very healthy again.  With new soil your tree may recover in time.  Make sure the container drains well.

23
Citrus General Discussion / Re: SOUTHEASTERN CITRUS EXPO NEWS
« on: October 24, 2018, 02:21:46 AM »
I've been wanting to go to the SE citrus expo but November is the busiest time for me at work so it is hard to find a good time to take off.  I'll let you guys know if I can actually make it down there.

24
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Variegated pink lemon tree tips?
« on: October 19, 2018, 04:16:43 PM »
Mine is in a container in a heated greenhouse.  A container is probably good for you if you have any chance of frost in the winter.  I see your zone9 low temp is ~25-30F, so you should move it indoors if there is a frost advisory.

I use osmocote plus 25-5-15 (the pink bag, most common type) to fertilize, and a free draining soil mix.  You should change the container soil every year, and move it to a bigger pot then if the roots are circling around.

Also, you may have Citrus Greening disease on your area, aka Huanglongbing.  I'm not sure how widespread it is in Florida.

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Citrus General Discussion / Re: Variegated pink lemon tree tips?
« on: October 19, 2018, 12:22:57 AM »
Congratulations!   Itís a nice tree.  I have one of these but mine is only half that size.  The pink striped lemons are really novel.  Care is the same as any other citrus tree.  Are you keeping it in a container or planting in the ground?

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