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Messages - Yorgos

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1
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Help with Citrus Leaves
« on: February 18, 2019, 02:19:14 PM »
If applied as a systemic to the ground will Imidacloprid translocate to the flowers and impact bees?  I have always applied it to the soil at the base of the trees after blooming is done.  Since I understand citrus leaf miners aren't active until ambient temps are about 80 most of the citrus have finished flowering by this time where I live (except for kumquat which bloom late May, but the CLM's don't bother them much).

2
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Kumquat varieties update
« on: January 14, 2019, 01:57:49 PM »
As my changshou/fukushu has matured (it is now 4 years in the ground) it has gotten better and better.  I have a very fecund meiwa that is 20+ years old I almost ignore due to the fukushu. And meiwa is pretty darn good, let me tell you.  The meiwa is most excellent in salads.  I didn't do marmalade this year so jury is still out for which variety makes the best jam.

3
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Golden Retrever Tasting A Lemoon
« on: January 14, 2019, 01:14:06 PM »
Looks like a lab.

4
Ditto.  My Star Ruby grapefruit are still on the tree but I am planning on my low biurette spray this weekend on all my citrus.  Moro blood orange and ujukitsus and Meyers are still full of fruit so we will see..

5
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Lemon ID
« on: January 10, 2019, 05:19:31 PM »
Rather orange colored for a lemon. However, Meyer lemons move into the orange shades as they hang after ripening.

6
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Cushiony Cotton scale
« on: January 10, 2019, 05:17:04 PM »
On the old forum Dr. Malcolm Manners stated that Imidacloprid  does not enter into citrus flowers, therefore it does not enter into the fruit.
Thanks Millet.  I had heard that the Imidacloprid does don't get past the stem into the fruit yet we are warned to not apply during flowering so as not affect bees. Thus I am careful and apply systemics early so they have time to wear off.

7
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Cushiony Cotton scale
« on: January 04, 2019, 04:13:29 PM »
Imidacloprid from Bayer seemed to control Citrus Leaf Minor last year for several months. Applied after flowering, the trees had 3 flushes without the CLM, but by August the systemic had worn off enough to allow the pest back in.  My issue has been rust mites on my blood orange that really come on strong in September/October.  Interestingly, the rust mites don't bother my satsumas even though they are planted a few feet away from the blood oranges.  I hate to apply systemics any closer that 6 months from harvest so will have to be more diligent with a hort oil, neem and spinosad regimen.

8
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Do Oranges Have to be Culled?
« on: November 06, 2018, 11:37:42 AM »
Johnny Redland,  Many people wrongly suppose that citrus fruit draws all their required growth elements to produce a fully grown fruit from the foliage of the entire citrus tree.  However, research as shown that a particular fruit draws all of its required energy and nutrients only from the three closest leaves to the fruit, and not from the entire tree in general.  Thinning the crop load, especially the fruit clustering will help a lot to increase fruit size... especially on young trees. By the way Johnny how old is this tree?

I have 2 clusters of up to 10 star ruby grapefruits and the fruits have not gotten very large. Maybe baseball sized. How close do these 3 leaves per fruit need to be? On the same branch close enough?  Also, when should one thin the fruit and how "thin" should one do it?   
Millet, I acted on your low biurette spray advice before flowering, at fruit set and before drop to see about boosting fruit hold and, hopefully, fruit size.  This is the first year  (5 years in the ground) I have any production on this tree.

9
Empirical and video evidence indicate shows that cats rarely wil attack an adult rat.  An adult rat is too aggressive and will put up a fight the cat would rather avoid.  There are videos that show rats and cats ignoring each other as they both go thru trash looking for food and of rats running past a cat as if the cat was not there.  Cats will decimate the bird, lizard, frog, vole and mouse populations though.
 
What rats are to fruit growers cats are to the environment.
[/quote]

Well you need to show that empirical evidence to my cat. She was formerly feral and is unaware of this evidence apparently.
[/quote]


In the battle of cats vs. rats, the rats are winning: Researchers show ...
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/09/180927083342.htm
Sep 27, 2018 - The study -- the first to document interactions between feral cats and a wild rat colony -- shows that rats actively avoid cats, and only recorded ...

10
Roof rats love key limes.   My mother had to cut her tree down. We were absolutely inundated with roof rats in my townhouse community in Scottsdale. I even saw them crossing on top of the red lights to go from community to community.  One winter, I killed over 100 with rat traps and peanut butter.
Finally, this year it is under control.  The remedy?  Feral cats moved in, ate them all and left.  From my experience, if you have roof rats, that is the only way to get rid of them!!

Its been shown that cats will not tackle a grown rat. Cats will decimate birds, lizards, frogs and mice.  Adult rats they meekly avoid.

11
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Do Oranges Have to be Culled?
« on: October 30, 2018, 02:35:26 PM »
Blood oranges are not as big as navels certainly.  My moro's get about tennis ball size. Can you post a picture of your fruit against a tennis ball or something so relative size is easier to grasp? I'm impressed you have gotten two years crops in a row.  My tree is strongly alternate bearing such that it rarely flowers every other year..

12
Citrus General Discussion / Re: kumquat tree good for rootstock?
« on: October 22, 2018, 05:06:58 PM »
I stand by my meiwa kumquat starting in late November, early December, eating fruit after fruit, spitting the seeds out onto the ground yet I never get any seedlings.  Same with my chang-shou kumquat.  Even throwing blemished fruit down and they never send up volunteer seedlings.  Are kumquats particular as to sprouting conditions? 

13
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Kumquats in pots- when to take in?
« on: October 22, 2018, 05:02:05 PM »
Neem is not poisonous to mammals (or any vertebrate for that matter).  It is used in cosmetics frequently.  A wash with water mixed with a little soap, rinse again and you'ld be good to go I think.   

14
Roof rats love key limes.   My mother had to cut her tree down. We were absolutely inundated with roof rats in my townhouse community in Scottsdale. I even saw them crossing on top of the red lights to go from community to community.  One winter, I killed over 100 with rat traps and peanut butter.
Finally, this year it is under control.  The remedy?  Feral cats moved in, ate them all and left.  From my experience, if you have roof rats, that is the only way to get rid of them!!
Empirical and video evidence indicate shows that cats rarely wil attack an adult rat.  An adult rat is too aggressive and will put up a fight the cat would rather avoid.  There are videos that show rats and cats ignoring each other as they both go thru trash looking for food and of rats running past a cat as if the cat was not there.  Cats will decimate the bird, lizard, frog, vole and mouse populations though.
 
What rats are to fruit growers cats are to the environment.

15
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Pomegranates in upper Texas Gulf Coast
« on: September 25, 2018, 02:04:40 PM »
Go Astros!

16
Squirrels eat just about everything except my citrus (grapefruits, lemons, oranges, mandarins are ignored).  One winter 4 or 5 years ago they ravaged my meiwa kumquat tree but that has not been repeated since (that was a low production year for my pecans, and acorns, so they must have gotten desperate).  Curiously they left my carambola alone (it froze last year so I don't have it anymore) and it was very productive.  Squirrels will eat my peaches, persimmons and pomegranates when they are still small and hard. They are murder on my figs and clean up what the birds leave. 

Best option is to trap, shoot or poison but poison has collateral damage I do not like to consider.   

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Brogdon avocad question
« on: September 21, 2018, 12:29:56 PM »
I have had more avocadoes die on me after planting than I care to admit.  Someday I would like to actually taste an avocado that can live here on the upper Texas Gulf coast but all the reviews say they taste like grass.

18
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Pomegranates in upper Texas Gulf Coast
« on: September 21, 2018, 12:11:53 PM »
So pretty much all my pomegranates succumbed to some disease that turns the fruit black.  I am led to believe the vector for this disease is leaf footed bugs and stink bugs, which I have in profusion since I have numerous very large pecan trees on my property.  Anyone have a secret to manage the bugs/disease?  I am planning on a copper spray regimen next year after fruit set to see if that saves the fruit.

19
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Keeping Kumquats?
« on: September 21, 2018, 12:06:01 PM »
I have had a meiwa planted in the ground for almost 20 years without protection here in the Houston, Texas area.  It has done very well. Its about 10 ft high and 6 feet across.  The fruit is great for marmalade, add to salads or just eat straight from the tree. It is sweeter, and drier, than my changshou, which I also like. It just barely gets ripe by thanksgiving but you really need to wait until after New Years for the most consistent, sweetest taste.  How does seedless meiwa taste compared to the one with seeds? 

20
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: My small fruit tree orchard
« on: September 11, 2018, 10:48:16 AM »
That is a fine collection! I think that precocious pomelo will be taxing on a tree so small. 

21
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Scarring on fruit
« on: August 25, 2018, 12:50:42 PM »
Once you can see the flushes it might be too late.  CLM start laying eggs when the leaflets are too small to notice without a very close up inspection. 

My issue with HO is itís stays so hot down here itís hard to find a window to spray.

22
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Is horticultural oil safe for citrus
« on: August 16, 2018, 02:25:09 PM »

I have used neem oil in Perth western australia.......the strange thing is......they recommend it for ornamental trees here but not for citrus but in nz they say its fine for citrus...............we have a big problem with citrus leafminer over here.....I have tried pest oil/eco oil and it doesnt work........they coat the leaf but the miner still get in.....the neem is a bit different....it coats the leaf but it also soaks into the leaf ....killing the bug as well........it doesnt offer 100 % protection but i find its the best i can do.........I usually spray early eve around 6pm and every 14 days..........Spring is nearly here and all my trees are putting out spring flush..........last year the miner turned up early.....they are supposed to come summer time.......i hope they stay away this year....so i can get that spring growth to maturity .....will need to start spraying soon.........the only one i dont spray is the kaffer lime because i use the leaves for cooking on that one.
[/quote]

LDB, Neem is an organic extract that is widely used in the cosmetic industry to be applied topically. Also, it is approved to be ingested for certain ailments (perceived or not, I'm not sure). It is harmless to mammals and other vertebrates (lizards, frogs, birds and the like).  I've read it isn't the best for fish (not fatal but slightly deleterious) so keep it out of ponds and streams. In other words, no need to withhold neem from your kaffir lime because even if you ingested a little bit it could be good for you!  So spray neem without concern on your foodstuffs. (Clearly, as with everything, moderation is paramount.)

23
Howís it compare to changshou kumquat?

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« on: July 25, 2018, 05:07:13 PM »
Hi temps should make those grapefruits sweeter, I would think!

25
Citrus General Discussion / Re: What is this on my grapefruit?
« on: July 25, 2018, 09:18:50 AM »
Man your lucky!  I've spent a few hundred dollars buying lacewings trying to get them established with very limited luck, if any.
I'm sure they are endemic to your area.  Its just everyone is so quick to spray insecticides they may be at a low population level.  I've heard that regular spraying causes more damage to the population of beneficials (like lacewing, ladybug, wasps, bees, assassin beetles, pirate bugs, ground beetles, etc.) than to the problematic species ostensibly targeted.

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