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Messages - pineislander

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2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Cheap banana brace ideas?
« on: September 24, 2018, 07:57:09 PM »
In Central America they use twines to tie all the trees together making a mutual support web.
See video @ 8:00 minutes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lj9sh1dHIkU

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Cheap banana brace ideas?
« on: September 23, 2018, 06:50:12 PM »
Two bamboo poles lashed together. Most folks who have bamboo clumps eventually have dried culms which should be removed to prevent crowding. A pruning saw works well to cut them out.
 

4
For what it's worth, last year I cut one of these down. The wood is very spongy, soft and wet. It would not pass through my wood chipper just tore up and clogged the machine. I also dug out the stump and the roots were likewise.

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango tipping site looks normal?
« on: September 22, 2018, 09:05:06 AM »



6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Soursop - lots of flowers, but no fruit.
« on: September 18, 2018, 06:57:47 AM »
With Chennai being coastal you should look at seaweed for natural micronutrients

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Baby Mangos
« on: September 18, 2018, 06:44:32 AM »
Mango Azucar is a well known variety in Colombia.
According to Fairchild it is a small fibrous type to be rubbed soft and sucked through the skin.
https://www.fairchildgarden.org/Science-Conservation-/Plant-Collections/Tropical-Fruit-Collection/Curators-Choice-Mangos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Jm_VSs6M0k

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Cbx5A_cCF4

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Vegetative propagation from fruit tissue?
« on: September 16, 2018, 09:51:23 PM »
But could the stem of an apple or pear be induced to root? What if it had a leaf on it?
What type of tissue is typically used for tissue culture propagation?
(let's leave patent issues for a separate thread and just talk about what's biologically possible)

https://www.apsnet.org/edcenter/K-12/TeachersGuide/PlantBiotechnology/Pages/Activity5.aspx

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Wildlife in your fruit trees ?
« on: September 16, 2018, 05:35:22 AM »
Pruning mango found myself face to face with this peaceful little Screech Owl. I waited till the next day he had moved on, and hopefully he is on rodent control at night.


10
Hi guys, my 3 guava trees started to produce fruit this year and i am racing against fruit fly in order to get fruits before them.
I was wondering what is the earlier stage of ripening you can pick the fruit to let it ripen in the kitchen. I am affraid if i pick it too green it will not ripen after picked.
Here is a photo found in the net where we can have a scale of colors (especially the 3 on the left)



I waited for the fruit to become yellow and found some worms in some of the fruit. Is it ok to pick the fruit at the stage 1 (the darkest green), or it is safer to pick at the stage 2?

I've been picking at your Stage 1 and ripening at 21C.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What caused this Longan to die?
« on: September 13, 2018, 08:08:05 AM »
Thanks for the ideas, nothing was given or done to the tree since spring before fruit set. There are dozens more in the grove some holding as much fruit. Here is a wider view which might give a clue. Actually one astute immigrant worker gave a possible reason for what may have happened, have a close look and I'd like to see if anyone else can make the same conclusion. The potted tree in the foreground has been dead for over a year and I doubt it has any connection.



So, the only possible explanation that does make sense so far is that the location of the tree is directly under the power line which attracted lightning (un relámpago). Since the form of the tree was low and weeping & covered with moist fruit rather than tall and erect, the tree was not split or burned. It was well soaked by water enough that the energy was conducted down to the roots and killed them.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G3mq1mVChiI


12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What caused this Longan to die?
« on: September 13, 2018, 07:26:51 AM »
By the way, my avocado died back the same way.  It was a much smaller tree but it had fruits and just started browning.  Some leaves are still green but just about the entire tree is brown and the fruits wouldn't drop but shriveled up.Trees on either side of it are fine.

I am curious to learn what you think happened.
Like I said before it looks like waterlogging which avocado is very prone to in the rainy season. I too had selected avocados do the same a few in the row but all subjected to flooding, some died, some lived.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What caused this Longan to die?
« on: September 12, 2018, 08:29:12 PM »
Nuts! Never seen that before.

I see what looks like a graft line at the base?
It may be. This is at the former Treehouse nursery on Pine Island. The former owners Bill and Vivian Murray did lots of experimental stuff and may have grafted it, variety is unknown. No visible rot, root defect or anything else on the tree that I can see. This happened almost overnight the tree was just ready to be picked.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What caused this Longan to die?
« on: September 12, 2018, 08:26:30 PM »
Thanks for the ideas, nothing was given or done to the tree since spring before fruit set. There are dozens more in the grove some holding as much fruit. Here is a wider view which might give a clue. Actually one astute immigrant worker gave a possible reason for what may have happened, have a close look and I'd like to see if anyone else can make the same conclusion. The potted tree in the foreground has been dead for over a year and I doubt it has any connection.



15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / What caused this Longan to die?
« on: September 12, 2018, 03:07:43 PM »
Full of fruit and just died of no apparent reason, no flood or drought, neighboring trees (Lychee/Mamey) are both OK.
What caused its sudden death almost overnight?


16
Some of the recent trees may be small since demand has been so high following Irma and they aren't staying at the nursery so long.
All of mine were reasonable size and good quality but I bought early this year and heard the demand was very strong. When I was selecting there I went for diameter over all other factors, then if some had branches reasonably high I went for them, height was my last concern. Most trees I planted got tipped the same day I planted them if they hadn't started already.

I could tell none of mine had been in pots too long, all I did was run a knife up and down down vertically and criss-cross along the bottom to find anything circling and there weren't many, only toothpick size or less.

17
Hello all,

First, thank you for your very helpful posts. I have quietly consulted this forum for advice for years. I have two young (no harvest yet) mango trees: a Pickering that is growing vigorously and beautifully, and a Cogshall that looks terrible. Please help me diagnose my Cogshall's problem; is it bacterial black spot? How do I treat it?

I appreciate any thoughts on the matter!

Interesting is that many of your leaves look similar to a tree I was dealing with this time last year. As you can see just one micronutrient and fish emulsion spray and gypsum on soil cleared up the problem and this year the tree is very happy.

http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=1001.msg312557;topicseen#msg312557

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Millipede in Jabo
« on: September 10, 2018, 05:38:26 PM »
A couple of weeks ago I pruned my mango trees. We have been getting daily rains and the large millipede population has done some interesting work on the prunings. They skeletonized the leaves before they dried up and all that biomass has already been turned into composted pellets.
 


19
Thanks for your trust but I would suggest you contact a friend of mine who lives nearby. Jimmy Bui is from Vietnam and should be better acquainted with the details of what you are looking to do and the language. He does sell trees.
https://www.google.com/maps/uv?hl=en&pb=!1s0x88db49eeea614c39%3A0x6ce650ede1687891!2m22!2m2!1i80!2i80!3m1!2i20!16m16!1b1!2m2!1m1!1e1!2m2!1m1!1e3!2m2!1m1!1e5!2m2!1m1!1e4!2m2!1m1!1e6!3m1!7e115!4shttps%3A%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com%2Fp%2FAF1QipPVeUik1ZwjIncuS_9MPbS6rhCqJDzrl7ti0Juy%3Dw426-h240-k-no!5sla%20vang%20orchard%20-%20Google%20Search&imagekey=!1e10!2sAF1QipOANwQThISkVZj3oypyD-K0ZTcgFrzg_x4saCdY&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiarumr8q7dAhUE0VMKHfOFCtIQoiowE3oECAoQCQ

https://www.yelp.com/biz/la-vang-tropical-fruit-farm-and-garden-vuon-tr%C3%A1i-c%C3%A2y-la-vang-st-james-city

https://www.facebook.com/Vuon-Trai-Cay-La-Vang-747876128607940/

20
You need to use an "all of the above" strategy. Sell some, trade some with folks who have something else later on, freeze some, dry some, can some as jam, jelly, etc.
I once lived in the tropics in a more open house without air conditioning. We had a fruit cabinet with fine mesh screen and legs resting in cups of water to keep away ants and flying insects. If there is something you want you can trade for it. I traded (windfall) mangoes with the fish market guys for fish guts/carcasses to make fish emulsion fertilizer which completes the circle, they were throwing it away in the bay anyhow.

21
Have you ever actually eaten the fruit? If I had a tropical greenhouse this space hog wouldn't be my first choice. They get big anda. fruit is the size of a garden pea Lots of fruit if the tree size is large but handfuls from a small tree.
Fruit size normally is much bigger than pea. More about the size of a penny.
I must admit I only have eaten from one tree which is large but fruits are small. However I just scanned many videos of the fruit other people are getting and the majority are far smaller than the 3/4"(19mm) of a US penny. If you normally get fruit like that Bless your Heart!

22
I bought 50 Zill mangoes direct earlier this year and agree about their soil mix but also could tell that there is a big difference between trees direct from Zills and trees which have been crowded up at some nursery and forced to run upwards losing leaf and getting tall thin and spindly.

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Why wont my passion vine fruit?
« on: September 09, 2018, 04:45:04 PM »
The best bees for passionfruit are the big Carpenter bees, honeybees are small and do collect nectar and should pollinate they are too small to pollinate as well as the bigger bees.
Passionfruit can be self-compatible or self-incompatible, so what you really want is to grow from seeds so that you get different cultivars. If you got cutting-grown plants you have clones which may be self-incompatible, but if you grow two different seeds you then have separate varieties with enough genetic difference to be able to pollinate each other. Generally the purples are self compatible but would always grow a few different plants anyways.

If you are using various hybrids to try and pollinate each other I don't know how compatible they might be across hybrids of different species.
Info:
http://beeaware.org.au/pollination/pollinator-reliant-crops/passionfruit/

24
Get a friend in USA to buy and send for you.

25
Hi, I have some Muntingia calabura / Jamaican Cherry seeds and am having a nightmare trying to germinate them. I have bought 2 different lots of seeds off ebay from two different parts of the world. So far to try and get them to germinate I have tried :

Putting them in a damp piece of toilet roll, wrapping in plastic and putting in a heated propagator
Putting in the soil  in pots in a unheated propagator in a greenhouse
Putting them under a grow lamp in a unheated propagator in a room that is generally 20-25c most of the time with grow light on 247
Putting them in a pot just under the soil sat under a grow lamp turned on 247 in a room 20-24c

None of the above work, so im wondering whether dried seeds are even viable for Muntingia calabura ?. As everything I have read they seem to sow the fruit and seed directly into the soil for the best result. Getting hold of fresh fruit in the UK is impossible from what I have found though.

I have found plenty of places in Australia, USA that sell the live trees but dont ship internationally.

I have  fruiting mango tree, a lychee and a avocado in the same 20-24c grow light area and they are all growing just fine, and will be transplanted to a tropical greenhouse we are building on a farm with 7 metre head height. Its all going to be heated for free by the waste heat from my brothers wood chip heating / wood kiln business that runs 247 365 days a year, so heating isnt going to be a problem in the long run, it will be like the tropics in there.

I have successfully germinated several types of guava, key lime, sugar apple, cheramoya, melon etc but Muntingia calabura is a nightmare.

The issue I have is getting the damn things to germinate in the first place, once they are growing we will have a perfect home for it, but getting hold of a seedling or seeds that actually sprout is proving very difficult.
Have you ever actually eaten the fruit? If I had a tropical greenhouse this space hog wouldn't be my first choice. They get big and fruit is the size of a garden pea. Lots of fruit if the tree size is large but handfuls from a small tree.

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