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Messages - Epicatt2

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1
Wondering whether there are any nurseries in Florida selling native Florida Asimina species.  I've been looking for some but without any luck so far.

I'm interested in trying a couple of those species which can produce small but edible fruit here in zone 9b. 

These native Asimina species, some of which range well into the south areas of Florida do produce edible fruit contrasted with Asimna triloba the (typical northern pawpaw) which is reported to be reluctant to regularly set any fruit here in 9b because we don't have enough chilling hours for it.

I'm hoping someone here on the Forums may know someplace that's offering them.

Fingers X-ed!

Paul M.
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2
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Giant Finger Lime QQs . . .
« on: July 27, 2020, 06:35:40 PM »
It looks like the skin will turn yellow when ripe, and they will probably fall off the plant
How many fruit do you have ? You could probably try one when they seem full size, and start to break colour, ie get a tinge of yellow.

Thanx for the suggestion, pagnr; i'll try that.  But . . . so far the fruits on my Giant Finger Lime have stayed green and hard although about two or three have fallen off but that was because they were spoiled, bruised  –or damaged by the tree's own spines because of the wind.

One fruit was only spoiled a little on one end so I cut it open and it had those loose vesicles inside just the same as a regular fingerlime and a good lime flavor, slightly on the acid side, but not too bad. But my sense of it was that it wasn't yet fully ripe.

So far none ot the dozen fruit still hanging on the tree are showing any inclination of wanting to turn yellow yet.  I'll just have to wait and see.

Cheers!

Paul M.
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3
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Giant Finger Lime QQs . . .
« on: July 27, 2020, 01:20:14 AM »
I don't think I would want the Giant Finger Lime.  Regular Finger lime seems to be a better selection.

I too would much like to have one or more of the interesting color forms of the typical Austrailan Fingerlime but none seem to be available here in Florida at the present time. 

There are some available for sale in California and Australia but no citrus is permitted entry into Florida in order to protect against introducing certain diseases of citrus into our State.

Paul M.
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4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Ground squirrels
« on: July 26, 2020, 08:23:55 PM »
Longranger, try this:

Mix together some wheat germ and concrete powder together half & half and add one or two drops of anise oil and stir it in well.

Put the mix in a bowl and place where squirrels will find it, but where it is protected from the dew and rain (obviously).  Put a bowl of water nearby because they will be thirsty after eating this mix.

I had squirrels chewing up my orchid collection one year and used this mix successfully to rid my yard of them here in Florida.

Also since this mix is not a poison per se then any cat or hawk, etc. that catches one of these affected squirrels won't be poisoned second-hand.

Best of all the rodents never develop an immunity to this mix.

OK — HTH

Paul M.
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5
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Makok
« on: July 26, 2020, 12:58:56 PM »
I bought a small 'Makok' (2-in. pot) from Jupiter, FL on eBay back in February. They are still available from the same vendor.

It was only 4-inches tall when I got it but I eventually moved it into a 1 gal. pot.  It is growing very slowly and has only produced about three, maybe four more pairs of leaves since I got it and repotted it.  And it is watered regularly and fertilized weakly every so often.  Recently I read somewhere that this cultivar is very slow-growing.

I chose the 'Makok' because it is supposed to stay small, but now I'd kinda like to add a 'Butterscotch' if I can find one.

Paul M.
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6
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Giant Finger Lime QQs . . .
« on: July 26, 2020, 11:01:48 AM »
Laaz,

I have no reason to believe that Brite Leaf is saying anything other than what is true about this citrus species sport.

I'm willing to accept what has been presented as a reasonable explanation for the difference of this sport from a typical fngerlime. Taxa mutate all the time without any sexual recombination.

The only way to really determine what this plant is exactly is by mapping its genome.  Not sure who would undertake doing that.  Or maybe it has been mapped and we are unaware of where to look for the results.

Regards,

Paul M.
==

7
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Giant Finger Lime QQs . . .
« on: July 26, 2020, 09:58:22 AM »
Laaz, I looked at the Faustrime photos at the link you provided.  The fruit there is similar looking to but the two not really the same, IMO.

Here is what the owner of Brite Leaf wrote when asked about the 'Giant Finger Lime':

The Giant Finger Lime is “new”.  I have 2 trees that I use as my budwood source.  These trees were obtained through the Florida Department of Agriculture’s budwood facility as Australian Finger Limes.  When my trees started fruiting the fruit did not look like it should.  So, I contacted the state to research the issue.  It turns out that the trees they had supplied me with were a bud sport off of an Australian Finger Lime.  They were unaware of the difference until somebody’s tree produced fruit.  Faced with many nurseries having propagated trees with this budwood, they decided to give it a new name.  The fruit inside looks just like all the finger limes that I have seen. The outside shape is all that is different.

Here is a photo of the 'Giant Finger Lime' fruit:



And one of the fruit on the plant:



And one of the plant habit:




So you can see from the photos that the fruit is most likely not the same as the Faustrime.

OK — HTH

Paul M.
==
PS - Guess I'm not going to get an answer about how to tell when this fruit is ripe.
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8
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Giant Finger Lime QQs . . .
« on: July 25, 2020, 06:38:57 PM »
Your description sounds more like an Australian Faustrime.

It's definitely a sport of a green Australian Fingerlime.  This was plant material that was being distributed some years back for a short while by the Florida Division of Plant Industry in Gainesville.

Their material sported and then got distributed to nurseries around the state before they disciovered the sported material at which point the Div. destroyed all the sported material.

The one nursery I mentioned decided to call it a giant fingerlime and when I inquired they filled me in on the situation which they had learned when they contacted Plant Industry to report that the material they had gotten was producing differently shaped fruit, although the plants themselves seemed to be the typically thorny, tiny-leafed fingerlimes. This is information that  I wanted to share here with TFF in this thread.

But I'd still very much like to know if there's anyone else on TFF who's growing this sport and has figured out when to harvest the fruit and how to tell when.

Cheers!

Paul M.
==

9
Citrus General Discussion / Giant Finger Lime QQs . . .
« on: July 25, 2020, 03:08:54 PM »
I bought a Giant Fingerlime from Briteleaf about a year ago and when I asked about it they explained that it is a sport from a regular green fingerlime that was stock which originally came from Gainesville as a green fingerlime.  Gainseville's stock unbeknownst to them had mutated so they had been selling it as the regular green fingerlme without realizing it had sported. None of  their cuttings had fruited yet so they did not know there was a difference.  Gainesville destroyed all the sported stock once they realized it was not the regular fingerlime any longer.

But Briteleaf kept theirs and, at first  thinking that it was probably an unknown hybrid of something crossed with a green fingerlime, marketed it as a 'giant fingerliime'.  Of course we now know that is was a sport.

The fruit on mine looks like little pointy-ended footballs but I haven't learned how to know when the fruit are ripe and ready to pick because they remain quite hard.

So at last my question:
Is anyone here on the TFF growing this (Briteleaf) Giant Fingerlime and has figured out how to know when the fruit is ripe?

TIA

Paul M.
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10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Banana Harvest Question
« on: July 24, 2020, 09:30:59 PM »
Eddie is right, Dirt Diva.  The bananas tend to stay green on the tree.

In fact for most varieties they should be harvested while all are green.  And that is done after all the fruit has plumped up fully.

OK — HTH

Paul M.
==

11
Recipes / Re: Loquat Jam
« on: July 24, 2020, 04:33:13 PM »
Don Giorgio,

I know that this is a very old thread but your loquat jam looked just yummy.  If I made it I think that I would add a bit of lemon or lime juice to the recipe to give an acid compliment to the sweetness.

I used some loquats to make a cobbler once. The recipe was a typical, basic, cobbler recipe but I added a sprinkling of lime juice to the loquat filling and a small scattering of flour as a thickener.  The resulting cobbler was wonderful and tasted almost as if it had been made with apricots.

The filling for the cobbler –apart from the lime juice and sprinkling of flour– was essentially the same as your jam recipe.  I was surprised when the flavor smacked so nicely of apricots.

Cheers!

Paul M.
==

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Banana Harvest Question
« on: July 24, 2020, 12:46:55 AM »
I bought a Double Mahoi but it was mislabeled and is apparently a Dwarf Brazilian but it has been my best blooming banana cultivar.  All I have to do to get it to produce fruit is to just keep dumping fertilizer on it and keep it well watered.

Anyway, I cut the stalk of bananas once they have filled out but are still green.   I hang the stalk somewhere in the shade and in a cool place if possible.  The blossom gets cut off, too, and can be cooked as a fresh veggie, if you like.

At first only a couple bananas a day will turn yellow and those can be used and eaten at that time.

But eventually all the rest on the stalk will start to turn yellow en masse, often in just two or three days.  One of the things I do with all those bananas that have ripened all together is to make banana jam with them.  (Hey, there's only so much banana bread you can get away with making at one time!)

The banana jam is easy to make and will keep in your 'fridge for a good while.  And if you have too much banana jam a few extra jars can be given to your neighbors.

If making banana bread or banana jam doesn't appeal to you I found a really great banana cookbook with many different kinds of recipes good for using up excess bananas.  It's called GOING BANANAS, by Susan Quick.  It is out-of-print but there are still used copies to be had on Amazon, ABE Books, or eBay.

OK — HTH

Paul M.
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13
For anyone who might be interested, here's a link to an article I found about this Central American cucurbit:

REFLECTIONS (on Cucurbits) by Joseph Simcox
https://explorewithjoseph.com/blog/reflections

OK — HTH

Paul M.
==

15
A couple other QQs that have not been asked about this plant, New Jungle:

~ How much cold can it take?
~ How big/tall does this get as a tree?
~ Is it particular as to what kind of soil that it prefers?
~ As a vine how far does it run?  Would it be happy growing on a chainlink fence?
~ Atho this species produces flowers of both sexes does having a 2nd one nearby help any with fruit-set?

It sounds like a vigoruous plant but i think that knowing some of these things would help those folks who may be space limited or zone challenged to decide on this plant.

Cheers!

Paul M.
==

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Wonderful pomegranate FL
« on: July 22, 2020, 07:19:11 PM »
Thanx Roback. 

Much appreciated.  I had no guess.

Paul M.
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17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Wonderful pomegranate FL
« on: July 22, 2020, 04:16:54 PM »
Roback,

You mention that PIN sells poms.  I've seen PIN mentioned here a few times but who is PIN, please.

TIA

Paul M.
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18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Wonderful pomegranate FL
« on: July 21, 2020, 07:23:35 PM »
So which pom cultivars should be productive in Florida, zone 9b?

I've heard that a variety called somethng like 'Vietnam Pink' is one that should do well for zone 9b.

Paul M.
==

19
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: New Nursery in Tampa
« on: July 20, 2020, 08:08:03 PM »
I welcome Mike's new FoodForest enterprise and wish him success.  He has the potential to provide a useful local resource, especially to us who live in Hillsboorough and Pinellas counties!

About three years ago I started building myself a Fruit Forest at my home.   I wish I'd started sooner but hey, better late than never.  The impetus for starting it was to eventually be able to circumvent paying Publix, etc. exorbitant prices for fresh fruit that is cosmetically beautiful but which proves to be less than flavorful far too frequently.

I'm starting to get a few things now to bear fruit but it's still early as most of them are still young.  I've gotten a couple nice racks of bananas so far and a canistel which was interesting for a first ever tasting.

I have a few more things I'd like to install in my yard before I run out of space and I'm kinda counting on places like Mike's new enterprise to help me fill in the gaps.

I think we'd be wise to support such an effort.

Cheers!

Paul M.
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20
if you leave [fruit on the tree] till very close to usual bloom time in Florida which is around February-April the result may be a failure to get bloom. If the avocado fails to bloom that, in turn, sets the tree up to take a year off then begin an altranate bearing cycle where you get a heavy crop one year then no crop.

That's useful information about why an avocado tree might change its fruiting habit from yearly to every other year.

In your experience does such a change become permanent or will a tree eventually revert to fruiting annually?

Just curious . . .

Paul M.
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21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Wetter-Sticker for BT . . .
« on: July 18, 2020, 02:04:48 PM »
It takes very little BT to work.  I dont remember exact amount now but maybe 1/2 oz per gal.  So you just need a tsp in your sprayer and it wont clog.  Just a mist so it doesnt run off.  The stuff dries off and is there until it rains.  BT works super good, a few bites and the catapillars drop dead.

Thanx again Spaugh.  From the label on the BT bottle I'll only need 1/4 to a 1/2 tsp in the sprayer bottle which only holds a quart.

Makes sense that a light mist would be all that is needed.  I also was thinking that using a wetter-sticker would help the mist dry off more quickly.

So Spaugh, one question more for you: When a catterpillar has munched on a sprayed leaf and has become innoculated, how long does it generally take for the caterpillar to succumb to the BT infection?  Would that happen in only hours or would it take a day or so?

Cheers!

Paul M.
==

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Clementine fruit tree?
« on: July 18, 2020, 01:50:21 PM »
Just keep in mind that a rooted cutting will not be dwarfing and might grow large if conditions are right. 

Hey EDG,

Brian's right.   A rooted cutting won't necessarily be a dwarfed tree unless the cultivar itself is a dwarf or semi-dwarf cultivar. 

However growing the tree in a pot tends to keep it smaller plus there's always pruning to keep the tree from getting taller than you want and pruning is also useful for shaping the tree the way you'd like it.

Just FWIW . . . .

Paul M.
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23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Wetter-Sticker for BT . . .
« on: July 18, 2020, 01:37:54 AM »
BT doesnt need a sticker in my experience just a mist on the tree or plant and its there for good unless it rains.

That's encouraging to know, Spaugh, thanx.  I was intending to apply the BT using a handheld manual trigger pump sprayer.  It has an adjustable nozzle which can deliver anything from a narrow stream to a fine mist.

It is fitted with a quart bottle as its reservoir and I was thinkng that a drop of some sort of wetter-sticker would help to keep the nozzle aperture from clogging up and make it easier to rinse out after use.

Cheers!

Paul M.
==

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Wetter-Sticker for BT . . .
« on: July 17, 2020, 05:10:41 AM »
A couple of my young citrus trees have been very popular with the Florida Swallowtail this year and their caterpillars managed to strip off about half the leaves before I noticed them.  So I want to spray the trees with BT (Bacillus thuringiensis), and I'd like to us a wetter-sticker with it.

Not sure how the BT will react to something like a couple drops of Dawn Liquid but then got to wondering whether I could use a tiny bit of molasses instead.  Think that might provide enough sticking effect even if very well diluted and prolly wouldn't hurt the BT organism.  (Of course I wouldn't want to use so much molasses that it would encourage sooty mold; just enough that it would break the surface tention of the water.)

Or maybe there is no need to use a wetter-sticker with BT.

Comments?  Suggestions?

TIA

Paul M.
==

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Clementine fruit tree?
« on: July 17, 2020, 04:52:45 AM »
Hey EDG,

Try Brite Leaf Citrus Nursery in Lake Panasoffkee, FL.  They offer grafted 'Nules' Clementines, both regular and on dwarfing rootstock.  And if you will be growing it in a pot they sometimes have inexpensive, 'rooted cuttings' of it.

Here's a link to their website: [ www.briteleaf.com  ]

I've bought about a dozen different sorts of citrus from them and all have thrived.  Plants arrive always safely packed & are promptly shipped. My Clementine from them produced about a dozen fruit the first season I had it and it was still in the 5-gal pot that I'd planted it in to start off with.

OK — HTH

Paul M.
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