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Messages - palingkecil

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1
Guava has very thin bark which makes it difficult to get a good cambium contact. In March, I did a few bark and cleft grafts.  All the cleft grafts failed and only one bark graft (Jalisco rojo) survived. Probably more of bark grafts would have survived had I not removed the buddy tape prematurely.



In July, I did two veneer grafts of Pakistani Guava scions on to a Century guava root stock. Veneer grafts I did were about 2-3 inches long. Once grafted, I covered them with white kitchen towel for 2 weeks to prevent drying from sun exposure and both took.



I have read that Bud graft (especially Fokert) also do well.

Thank you for sharing your experience.
Sorry I might ask silly questions, I am new in grafting world.
Do you cover all part of the scion with tape, or you leave the bud part open? Because I saw a video on youtube about grafting guava in Asia, and seems like they like to keep the buds on the scion uncover.   
How long before you uncover the scion?
Thanks!

2



This is the same guava tree.
Left and center are bark graft.
Right is side graft.

All grafts used water bags.

Most important step is to cut the nurse leaf.
The capillaries in the cut end draw water up to the scion, to keep the scion fresh.

I used 3 bags to graft a big branch of Atemoya.
I left grafted tree under shade.
I didnít know it got morning and afternoon sun light.
All leaves except the 3 inside water bag wilted.
All 3 water bags were dried.

So check water bag and use a syringe to refill.

If you have good shade you could graft a big branch, with a few water bags.
My friend have successes using 1 water bag to graft 12Ē Atemoya branch.

You are a professional grafter!
The multi grafted atemoya looks great.
My tree is in the ground, so there is no way I can put it under the shade.
It gets about 12 hours of direct sun.
Do you think put the lunch paper bag over the graft part will work?
Just want to make sure, do I close the ziplock bag completely or do I leave a little opening so the leaf inside can breath?
Thanks!



3
Water bag is a sandwich ziplock bag.
Itís not air tight.
Water is only 1/4Ē from bottom, enough to keep the cut end of the nurse leaf wet.


This is a successful guava bark graft after 5 weeks.
I removed the water bag after new shoots emerged, 4 weeks in this case.
The nurse leaf with the cut end still feeding the scion.









This my Atemoya graft.
Iíll remove water bag next week.


This is another good atemoya graft during summer.
The nurse leaf still attached.




I hole punch holes into white lunch bag to protect delicate graft during summer, like guava and Atemoya and young mango scion.
Hardened mango scion can handle full sun.

You can use this technique to graft mango during winter.
You can graft evergreen tree any time as long as there is no frost.
Sorry, I missed the word 'bark' in your explanation.
Thank you very much.
I will try this technique.
Do you leave a little opening on the ziplock bag so it is not airtight and the leaf can breath?

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Anyone has tips on grafting guava? Please share.
« on: September 08, 2020, 04:39:04 AM »
My friend who has 30 years of experience on grafting fruit tree told me that guava and lychee are the toughest to graft.
I really want to multi graft my guava tree. It is a healthy Vietnamese giant, about 7 ft tall, has been 8 months in the ground. I want to graft Dolores and Jalisco to it.
My grafting experience so far is only white sapote and loquat with 95% success rate. Avocado with 10% success rate (part of the failure because of the heatwave).
If anyone have any helpful tips or tricks to increase the success rate, please kindly share here.
I will graft the scions onto the lateral branches. Possibly the green young ones since it will be easier to cut through.
Any thought will be highly appreciated.
Thank you everyone!


5
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Annona sale starts Sep 15
« on: September 07, 2020, 06:48:56 PM »
I would love to buy some of the yucatan custard apple trees.
How different those 3 taste wise?
Will it be okay to pick up this weekend?
I would also like to purchase scions of jalisco red guava and dolores. Do you have any tips to graft guava? I understand that guava is one of the hardest to graft.
Thanks!

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What are the best varieties of wax jambu?
« on: September 02, 2020, 12:25:20 PM »
Thanks for your response! Sadly I don't really know if Borneo Red is really from Borneo. I just happen to find the variety at a nursery, but haven't gotten it yet. I'll try Papaya Tree Nursery, but it seems hard to get plants from Alex. I believe you have to make an appointment, and from my experience it doesn't seem like he has the plants I'm looking for in stock. Have you ever purchased plants from him?

Thai jumbo is the sweetest one I've ever tried. Unfortunately it takes years before it can bear fruit.
I never heard of Borneo Red, is it from Borneo?
Alex from Papaya Tree Nursery has an unknown variety that is sweet, productive, and precocious. Plenty of fruit in a 5 gallon.
Other varieties like Black Pearl, Black Diamond, or Black Kingkong are depends on the growing conditions. I tasted super bland and tasteless Black Pearl grown in El Monte, but a pretty good ones from another source in Arcadia
Yes, I've purchased many plants from Alex, and I am happy to say all plants I got from him are healthy and productive.
To purchase the plant, usually I will email him first explain what I want, then ask to put me in the waiting list if it is not available. Usually it takes 6 months for him to graft or airlayer a plant.
One thing I know, he won't sell a plant that is not 100% ready.
You can visit his nursery by appointment, during the covid is actually easy to get same day appointment. I visited him twice during the covid. Face mask required and he will maintain 6 ft distance with you.
He knows a lot about tropical plants, he will explain how to take care of each plant for hours. One thing I really like about purchasing from him is, he is honest. If he thinks it won't do well in your zone, he will tell you.

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What are the best varieties of wax jambu?
« on: September 01, 2020, 08:06:50 PM »
Thai jumbo is the sweetest one I've ever tried. Unfortunately it takes years before it can bear fruit.
I never heard of Borneo Red, is it from Borneo?
Alex from Papaya Tree Nursery has an unknown variety that is sweet, productive, and precocious. Plenty of fruit in a 5 gallon.
Other varieties like Black Pearl, Black Diamond, or Black Kingkong are depends on the growing conditions. I tasted super bland and tasteless Black Pearl grown in El Monte, but a pretty good ones from another source in Arcadia

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Goji berry dropping flowers?
« on: August 31, 2020, 01:51:52 PM »
When the tree gets older, it will love heat. We have one in the ground, about 10 years old. On summer it gets 12 hours of sun. Even without water and fertilizer, it still produces bunch of berries each season. Very drought tolerant, we don't water it in the heat wave here and it does fine. We don't like the berry though, so we let the birds eat them all.

9
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / WTB Anona Rosada Scion
« on: August 20, 2020, 05:42:04 PM »
Hi everyone,

I would like to purchase some Anona Rosada scions.
Preferably next year when the anonas are dormant here.
Thank you very much.

10
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: USPS delaying packages
« on: August 19, 2020, 02:01:49 PM »
My packages from Brad always arrive within 2 days. The dragon fruit just arrived today. Excellent fruit, will buy again!

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: sugarlata seedling
« on: August 15, 2020, 08:11:15 PM »
Beautiful tree. How old is it? What fertilizer do you use?

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: asian grocery store fruit haul
« on: August 14, 2020, 02:01:21 AM »
Hopefully somebody with experience can answer that.   I just googled "durian ripeness" and read suggestions like:
- it may crack on its own when ripe (mine didn't)
- it should smell some but not strongly until you open it (mine was like this)
- if you shake it you should hear soft thud of movement inside (mine was like this)
- scrape the stem and it should be green inside (mine was brown)
- push hard between spikes in the skin and it should give slightly (mine was like this)

Based on my humble experience growing up in Asia:
- it may crack on its own when ripe (mine didn't) --> this only happens when it ripe on the tree. Almost impossible to get the ones ripen on the tree this days, as they will turn bad very quickly except if you freeze them immediately.

- it should smell some but not strongly until you open it (mine was like this) --> yes, the smell it the first indicate when it ripes.
But some varieties don't have strong smell when it ripes, like Musang King.
- if you shake it you should hear soft thud of movement inside (mine was like this) --> yes, it indicates the pods separate from its shell.
- scrape the stem and it should be green inside (mine was brown) --> any fruit imported from Asia won't have green stem, it takes a month or so for shipment. But we never really scrap the stem in Asia to check the ripeness. The 2 signs above are usually used to detect durian's ripeness.

- push hard between spikes in the skin and it should give slightly (mine was like this) --> yes, it split easily when it ripe.

The best fresh durian I've ever tried in US is from China town in New York. The best frozen one is from my friend who imports frozen fruits from Thailand.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: asian grocery store fruit haul
« on: August 14, 2020, 01:52:59 AM »
I have a question If you sit out Durian How long do you know when it is ripe
Does it need to be soft, and mushy ?

Do the pods need to be firm  or mushy
Thanks for this post
I think I can go to Chicago on the train , and find some
 (but We do have a Large Indian market that is new here and a old Asian Market.)

The outer stays firm no matter how ripe they are.
In Asia, we usually tell the ripeness by its smell, and how it sounded when you shake them.
Durians have many different varieties, some of them are mushy inside when ripe, some of them stay firm.
The famous Musang King stays firm when it ripest. Unless you buy the previously frozen one, because the flesh will become mushy after it thawed.
Personally, I like the mushy ones.

14
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Some temperate fruits
« on: August 13, 2020, 01:42:36 PM »
  PEACH UPDATE
Here are the fruits I took of from the peach yesterday...u are looking at exactly 136 fruits..should have done this way earlyer



Wow..your peach tree is really productive. What variety is that?

15
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Passionfruits
« on: August 10, 2020, 01:21:54 AM »
I've got more passionfruit boxes available 26$ for a medium flat rate box size. 

Boxes will be a mix of Fredrick and purple possum fruit.

One box , please.
PM sent.

16
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Seeds
« on: August 06, 2020, 03:48:06 PM »
updated list




Hi achetadomestica,

What is the difference between this fruit and Ilama? 

Thanks,
Al
Pm sent

Please PM me too. I am interested to know if I should grow both.

17
I am very interested to buy Graviola de montaŮa seeds, the yellow flesh one.
The Biriba looks interesting too.
Anything available?
How easy is it to germinate and how many years to bear fruit from seed?

Thanks!

18
I killed 2 already. In my experience they are very cold sensitive. Unless you grow them indoor or in the green house, they won't survive even a mild winter here.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Does Rambutan need cross pollination??
« on: August 03, 2020, 07:46:34 PM »
I am not an expert here, just want to share my little experience. Almost all fruit trees will benefit from cross pollination, even citrus tree. Some trees will fruit a lot heavier when cross pollinated, some just a little heavier. Depending on the variety, climate, and other enviromental factors.
Rambutan in my home country (indonesia) grow really big. I mean really big. I remember saw one about 20 meter in height and width as a kid.
Planting them one meter apart would be too close, unless you plan to trim them really heavy each year. It might not grow that big in Australia.
Maybe 3 meters apart will be decent.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Does Rambutan need cross pollination??
« on: August 03, 2020, 02:52:34 PM »
Rambutan does not need cross pollination, but you will get more fruit with cross pollination.
In Asia, it takes years for rambutan to start bear fruit. Once it starts, you will be drowned in rambutan. We used the fruit to throw at each other as kids because there were more than we can eat.

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Grow bags
« on: August 01, 2020, 02:06:46 AM »
I used some grow bags before, because I read that I don't need to trim the root with grow bags.
The pro, of course no root trimming needed, and it is lighter than regular container.
The con, the soil gets dry really quick. With conventional container, I only need to water twice a week. But with the grow bag my plants wilt if I don't water everyday during the summer.
Of course I live in So-Cali with very low humidity and dry intense heat.
It might work better if you have high humidity and no triple digit summer heat.

22
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Pitangatuba Seedlings For Sale
« on: July 29, 2020, 02:08:07 AM »
Yes I have plenty of these in stock.
My mother plants are all in pots... and I would guess the ground would always be a better option if freezing temps are not an issue.
Let me know if you are interested and I can send you some to try.

Thanks.

Kevin Jones

I already have one tree, and want another one because my family really like the fruit. My fruit has a good balance of sweet and tartness, very juicy, and smells wonderful. I usually hate sour fruit, but not this one.
Do they grow true to the seed?
I will buy one from you, pm me your paypal.

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Can Persian mulberry fruit in a pot?
« on: July 27, 2020, 08:04:10 PM »
Yes, I had one in a 5 gallon with dozens of fruit before.
But this tree is very vigorous, you either need to do root trimming or repot it every year.
I didn't have the patient to do either one, so I moved it  to the ground a year ago.
It grew about 4-5 ft in a year.

24
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Pitangatuba Seedlings For Sale
« on: July 27, 2020, 12:33:20 AM »
Do you still have this? I tried my first pitangatuba today and really like it.
Does it do better or produce more fruit in the ground?

25
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Makok
« on: July 26, 2020, 11:46:42 AM »
I apologize for interupting, I almost purchase a Makok, but changed my mind and purchase an Alano and a Silas instead. The reason is many growers find out that Makok does not produce well. The taste is similar to Alano, but bigger size, unfortunately most people say it will only give you few fruit a year.
If you don't mind the price, Papaya Tree Nursery has an unknown variety that very productive ( I visit the nursery not too long ago), delicious, and precocious (already has fruits in 5 gallon). But the price is $125 for a 5 gallon.
If I do not already have Alano and Silas, I would buy it. His trees are usually very productive and fruit early. Just my 2 cents.

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