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Messages - Millet

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 145
1
Citrus Buy, Sell, & Trade / Re: Dekopon seeds
« on: April 06, 2020, 02:54:29 PM »
Waxy your Dekopon  & Shiranui look and taste the same because they are exactly the very same fruit.  Just two names for the same fruit.

2
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Super happy kumquat tree!
« on: April 05, 2020, 04:47:03 PM »
Also, that is certainly a small container.  Soon you need to put the tree into a larger container.  When you do, move the tree in a container about 3 inches wider. The best to you and your tree.

3
It is best recommended to not make a growing medium with more than three ingredients.  The 5-1-1 bark, peat, perlite, or bark, peat, builders sand.   Some prefer a 5-2-1 (5 parts bark, 2 parts peat & 1 part perlite) which holds a little more water, but still allows plenty of aeration for the root system.

4
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Super happy kumquat tree!
« on: April 05, 2020, 02:58:07 PM »
Straight of slanted  doesn't matter.  Just measure a couple feet above the soil line and make your cut.

5
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Super happy kumquat tree!
« on: April 05, 2020, 12:09:20 PM »
I agree with cutting the tall branch at about 2 feet in height.  Citrus has what is called apical dominance, meaning that the highest bud sends out a hormone that keeps all buds below it from sprouting out.   By topping the tree, it removes the apical dominance and you will soon see the tree fill out.

6
Citrus General Discussion / Re: hose burst, greenhouse flooded
« on: April 04, 2020, 11:05:37 AM »
brian, your not the only one, my greenhouse has flooded twice in the last 20 years.  As it is said..."This too shall pass".  Actually I bet some of your trees loved it.

7
Citrus General Discussion / Re: splitting bark on Bearss Lime
« on: April 03, 2020, 10:06:35 PM »
Lemons4us wrote....." I wasn't careful enough when watering to make sure I didn't accidentally sprinkle the trunk? Or perhaps the damp potting medium was too. close to trunk."  For a container grown tree using the medium you are using, you do not have to worry about this at all. 

8
Pictures 1 & 2are showing the classic symptoms of an iron deficiency. Iron deficiency symptoms in citrus are:  New leaves with green veins on otherwise yellow leaf, and no wide green area sticking out from the vein.  Deficiency often caused by high pH rather than a shortage of minerals.

Pictures 3 & 4 :  Looking at the pictures it is difficult to see if the leaf veins are either yellow/orange or green.  Yellow veins would show an iron deficiency, while green veins would demonstrate a nitrogen deficiency.  Since both trees are yours, and are showing  deficiencies at the same time, they are both most probably suffering from the same problem.  You wrote that you are fertilizing with Foliage Pro but have not stated the amount of fertilizer used and how often you fertilize.  Foliage Pro does have a 0.1% iron concentration,  but with the rapid drainage of a 5-1-1 medium you could be washing out much of your fertilizer.  Know that citrus require MORE nutrition than most other plants.The quickest iron deficiency remedy would be a foliar spray with an Iron Chelate solution. Beyond the quick help of Iron Chelate foliar treatment you need to correct the pattern of care that caused this situation in the first place.  I would not be surprised that you are under fertilizing. The best to you and your trees.
 

9
Citrus General Discussion / Re: splitting bark on Bearss Lime
« on: April 03, 2020, 05:00:22 PM »
I can see why Poncirusguy advises painting the split, because it was long thought that painting the split was beneficial and gave some protection.  However, research has shown covering with either tar or paint is not effective in healing bark splits. From the pictures you posted the splitting does not look to be caused by phytopthria.  At this point if it was my tree I would watch it and presently do nothing. Bark splitting on lime trees is not all that rare.  One last comment, did your lime tree go through a period of drought then a period of watering?

10
Citrus Buy, Sell, & Trade / Re: For Sale : Valentine pomelo seeds
« on: April 02, 2020, 09:44:41 PM »
Valentine seed does not produce true

11
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Using coir instead of peat in 5-1-1?
« on: April 02, 2020, 01:22:53 PM »
The wood chips of Reptibark is fir wood.  The pH is 4.2

13
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Using coir instead of peat in 5-1-1?
« on: April 02, 2020, 10:45:05 AM »
Thanks Vlad you could certainly be correct.  Thanks for pointing this out.

14
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Using coir instead of peat in 5-1-1?
« on: April 01, 2020, 03:59:10 PM »
The pH of coir, depending on the manufacture is normally 5.5 to 6.8 which is very close to the exact pH for citrus growth.  Using a pH meter in such a lose medium as 5-1-1 would be difficult.  The first thing that comes to mind is the use of the pH paper strips that can be found in many larger garden centers.   Stick the strip down into the 5-1-1 and leave for a few minutes, then check the color change.    You could also take the pH of the affluent water. by setting a small container filled with your 5-1-1 into a larger clean container and fill the larger container up to the rim of the container holding the 5-1-1 with distilled water.  Let it soak for an hour and then take the pH of the water.  Just an idea.  Actually using coir with its pH range of 5.5 to 6.8, you will be very close to the recommended 6.5 pH.

15
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Using coir instead of peat in 5-1-1?
« on: April 01, 2020, 10:23:27 AM »
lebmung is correct.  The nursery industry which uses coir, always rinses out coir with water infused with Mg (Epson salts) and Ca (Calcium Nitrate) before using to flush out any possible salts. The salts if any depends on where the coconut tree grew. inland or on the coast.  Today most all coir distributors has already done the chemical flush for you. If it does not say on the package, a internet search of the manufacturer should answer the question. Also a comment on Lovetoplant's post, the long fibers of coir absorb moisture, but also drain quickly, so roots experience moist but not soggy growing conditions.

16
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Using coir instead of peat in 5-1-1?
« on: March 31, 2020, 10:46:00 AM »
I've used coir, and find it a good material for citrus.   The pH of coir is, depending of it source, 5.5 to 6.8 which is correct for citrus.  Depending on the source of peat, the pH of peat is 3.6 to 4.5.  An extra good point in favor of coir (at least for me) is that when dry coir is a lot easer to rewet than peat moss.  Growing in mediums such a 5-1-1 or 5-2-1 where the drain through (water pass through) is rapid, coir  retains more of the water than peat, but still allows for the higher oxygen level for the roots to respire. Chemically, coir which comes from the coconut contains potassium,  manganese, copper, zinc and iron.  I like coir.

17
Citrus General Discussion / Re: New Zealand lemonade tree
« on: March 28, 2020, 04:52:38 PM »
I grow the NZL tree.  I would put the cultivar into the novelty category.  I like the fruit for eating out of hand.  The acid content is quite mild  blended with a sweet taste.  Does taste somewhat like lemonade.  Cannot be used as a lemon due to the fruits low acid content.  Would be good to blend into salads.  Good to eat out of hand, but then one can only eat so much fruit out of hand,  The tree is very productive,

18
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« on: March 27, 2020, 10:32:47 PM »
From looking at your soil in the picture, it looks like you have a tractor and a disk.

19
Citradia, at what altitude are you located?

20
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Shasta Gold Mandarin
« on: March 27, 2020, 05:49:35 PM »
Johnny, the amount of leaves on your Yosemite Gold tree are so very full I can't see a single branch.  The growth is very columnar in shape.   

21
Citrus General Discussion / Re: What is flowering now for you?
« on: March 26, 2020, 06:28:07 PM »
Like lebmung wrote, Sour Orange is a fantastic rootstock, as long as the grower does not live in areas susceptible to tristeza virus.  Sour  Orange has high peel quality, high to very high internal quality, excellent tolerance to Phytophthora, no common incompatibilities except with kumquat & eureka lemon, broad soil adaptation, and as far as it's yield it is generally very similar to that of trees grafted on Carrizo.  One interesting point about trees grated on sour orange rootstock. Where tristeza is wide spread, all trees grafted on sour orange will be likely be killed, EXCEPT LEMONS.

22
Citrus General Discussion / Re: What is flowering now for you?
« on: March 26, 2020, 11:34:41 AM »
Ilya11, the FD you show above as being the tree that is comming out of dormancy earlier then your other FDs, then I would assume that it will also be less cold hardy than your other FD trees.

23
The tree was handled rather hard by the nursery, but still looks to be healthy.  It is flushing out in several locations on the tree.   With your good care it should soon be well on its way.

24
Citrus General Discussion / Re: What is flowering now for you?
« on: March 25, 2020, 09:37:51 PM »
Poncirusguy, a New Zealand Lemonade tree grafted on a Sour Orange rootstock is very interesting. I like that combination.  I bet that combination will produce a lot of high quality fruit per size of the tree

25
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Indoor Citrus Grow Tent Problems
« on: March 25, 2020, 01:07:24 PM »
After two or three weeks please post another picture of this tree, so that we can see the trees improvement.

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