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Messages - fruitlovers

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1
Hi Fruitlovers,
Do you have the one tree or several? As I have just one tree which makes only female flowers, very occasionally it will set a miniature seedless fruit which will ripen and is pleasant in taste, just not much of it as these fruits are only an inch in diameter.
Have just one tree.

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Rainforest Plum Quality Variability
« on: January 09, 2019, 06:30:48 PM »
I have observed and seen variability in fruit quality for rainforest plum.  Overall, I like the fruit.  But was wondering if anyone had particularly good ones.  I have obtained some seeds from Brazil of a supposed good variety, but will be at least 2-3 years before I get to try. 

Also, for all rainforest plum, is the skin astringent or is it just the one's i've tried were  that way?
Yup, have posted about variability in taste of rainforest plum before. I have 10 fruiting trees and have noticed quite a bit of variability. The variability is not just from tree to tree, but also depends on the weather at the time. They will taste kind of off when there is too much rain for prolonged period. I have not noticed any astringency in the skins.

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Air Layering, level : Legendary
« on: January 06, 2019, 05:27:34 PM »
Yes, he is from the Middle Java island, Indonesia. Basically on the entire 1st video above he mostly talked about the result of his work he did on very large limbs:
-Showing how the new root have developed on his larger than their thighs air layering.
-Yes, coco peet was being used, alternately he could also use soil gathered from under a “jambu” tree.
-The tight plastic wrapping on top of the bag was intended to prevent water from coming in.
- The water added to the newly transplanted tree into the green nursery bag is also to help make the soil more compact.

On the 2nd video: he’s giving narrative on how his air layering method is being done step by step, while his assistant showing the viewers how he did it with his thorough and detailed video so we can easily follow what he was doing.
On the 3rd video, he showed his special double layer of “multi approach graftings”, using 10 young roots from seedlings!

On other videos of his works that I watched, he also said that:
-Yes, his intention is to speed up the fruiting process, (he sells those trees) besides strengthening the root of the tree with multiple “approach grafts’s” like.
-The smaller roots he attached to the mother trees are from seedlings.
-He sells multi grafted trees on a more typically sized trees with airlayer/multiapproach roots process included.
-His trees will not only fruits a lot faster and stronger but will also have low hanging fruits…
Thanks for taking the time to give a condensed translation of the videos.

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Air Layering, level : Legendary
« on: January 06, 2019, 02:23:38 AM »
Well, the advantage would be planting mature wood that is ready to fruit quickly. Perhaps the donor trees needed severe pruning or were unwanted. It looks like they are using coconut coir for the rooting media. I think the word cangkok means airlayer because searches on youtube using that keyword produce many more examples.
It's true that bigger air layers fruit quicker. Yes they must be trying to either radically prune or destroy the mother tree by taking so many big limbs.

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Exotic fruit playing cards?
« on: January 05, 2019, 05:02:29 PM »
Suggest it to CRFG. That is something maybe they would do? Retired members might get a kick out of that one?

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Air Layering, level : Legendary
« on: January 05, 2019, 05:00:49 PM »
Super giant air layers potted into small bags? See starting minute 10. Don't see what the advantage would be? Seems very difficult to establish, hold upright, and then to transplant. I guess those are mangoes?

I totally agree, although it’s worth knowing you can do it that large I don’t  understand the purpose but guess it’s not my business

I guess that's Indonesia? Maybe some of our foreign members can explain what is being said? Can you imagine what would happen to mother tree after cutting so many limbs that size?  :o

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Experiment to get lychee to bloom
« on: January 04, 2019, 05:59:38 PM »
Experiment on pruning of new flushes showed that 70 percent of pruned branches flowered, versus 23 percent non non pruned branches:
file:///C:/Users/FRUITL~1/AppData/Local/Temp/4DecemberPruningofVeg-Nagao17-22.pdf

Tried the link but it says "file not found"...
Go to this page and click the link there for the article pdf file: https://hilo.hawaii.edu/panr/writing.php?id=254

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Air Layering, level : Legendary
« on: January 04, 2019, 05:18:27 AM »
Super giant air layers potted into small bags? See starting minute 10. Don't see what the advantage would be? Seems very difficult to establish, hold upright, and then to transplant. I guess those are mangoes?

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Experiment to get lychee to bloom
« on: January 04, 2019, 05:01:05 AM »
Experiment on pruning of new flushes showed that 70 percent of pruned branches flowered, versus 23 percent non non pruned branches:
file:///C:/Users/FRUITL~1/AppData/Local/Temp/4DecemberPruningofVeg-Nagao17-22.pdf

10
Article about new flush pruning on lyches showed that 70 percent versus 23 percent on non pruned branches flowered:
file:///C:/Users/FRUITL~1/AppData/Local/Temp/4DecemberPruningofVeg-Nagao17-22.pdf

Sorry bad link, go to this page and click the pdf file linK:
https://hilo.hawaii.edu/panr/writing.php?id=254

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Experiment to get lychee to bloom
« on: January 03, 2019, 01:46:25 AM »
Fruit lovers: as you can see in my pics the flush is well under way. Would a person pinch off brand new flushes even if temps were warm? It probably would of worked had I pinched them back at end of November because most of December was cool here however I wanted to wait because I didn't want the flowers to flush out in early January when it's our highest danger of freeze. Thus I waited till now so when the new buds after pruning develop they will develop in cool temps but won't open up until after the highest chance of freezes is over.
Yes you can cut the flushes even in warm temperatures, as long as it is still winter time. Remember, we never get cold temperatures in Hawaii, and cutting them off here still helped induce flowering. But the earlier you cut the flushes the better.

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Experiment to get lychee to bloom
« on: January 02, 2019, 05:55:02 AM »
Pruning new flushes definitely helps to promote flowering. Prune the flushes as soon as they start forming. There was a research paper published here about this topic. Proven to work.Just work intensive on large trees.

13
Borneo is a large island! It's not all lowland tropics. They have high elevation areas also.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Pachira variety?
« on: December 19, 2018, 05:17:46 PM »
I confuse about many Pachira aquatica picture
A lot of people confusing Pachira glabra with Pachira aquatica. The Pachira glabra has small green pod, the Pachira aquatica has very large brown pod.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Pachira variety?
« on: December 19, 2018, 03:33:28 AM »
Like it says on the video subject, it is Pachira aquatica.

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mangoes In Tropical Ecuador?
« on: December 17, 2018, 05:25:29 PM »
Oscar, what species is golden glow?
Also, what about m. quadrifida?
Thanks,
Peter
Golden glow is a Hawaiian cultivar of regular (inidica) mango. Have some quadrifida plants but still small. I think they will probably do ok here.

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mangoes In Tropical Ecuador?
« on: December 17, 2018, 12:40:42 AM »
You might consider a microclimate. What you are looking for is good air circulation plus some sort of rain shadow. Maybe even a temporary tarp over a tree or two could help provide some dry. Perhaps the crest of a hill. You might also look around the area for a local variety which is adaptable to graft with.

This fellow is in a high rainfall area in Hawaii and seems to have found such a variety.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMCkKl1AksU&t=7s
There is no such thing as a "rain proof mango", at least not of the indica species. All of the indicas will suffer to some extent from rains during flowering time in varying degrees. The variety he mentions, which he calls lajiwa, is really Mangifera laleejewa, which is a different species, and is really going to fruit well, but is not regular mango (indica). The other species that do well in rainy east Hawaii are odorata and kasturi. The mango he shows in the video i would guess is a Golden Glow. They are small and shaped like that and very susceptible to the russeting disease evident in his video.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Nishikawa Avocado - Aloha & Mahalo
« on: December 07, 2018, 02:00:03 PM »
Wow if a Nish is only considered good i cant wait to taste one that is considered great .  How does someone go about buying some of these exotic Avocados to taste ?
You're probably not going to get to taste them unless you grow them yourself. Hawaii is only allowed to export Sharwil, and then to only selected states that don't grow their own avocados.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Nishikawa Avocado - Aloha & Mahalo
« on: December 07, 2018, 05:08:31 AM »
I don't have any nishikawa but Japanese are smart plant breeders so it must be worth planting. Can someone see how long nishikawa avocado has been around? My guess is 25-30 years so it has a track record that is not well known on the internet. Spaugh was correct in tripling down on his nishi plantings to see what pans out. Not all fruit trees of a given variety are equal. Some are strong and some are weak. I see this on my "estate"

I planted three lula and only one is really very much flourishing/ I bought it in Home Depot in Sunrise FL in 15 gallon...$84 but it was worth it. Avocado trees are more finicky than mango by a long shot/ Have a brogdan too. No nishikawa/
Wasn't really bred by professional plant breeders, but by Kona coffee farmers. During beginning of the century most of the farmers here were Japanese. They selected choice types from hundreds of seedlings planted. That is why most of the old Hawaii avocado cultivars have Japanese names.
BTW, in this pamphlet from Hawaii tropical agriculture college, the Nishikawa, from possible ratings of excellent, very good, and good, is only given a good rating:
https://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/F_N-1.pdf

20
When is this durian in season?  I have been trying to get seeds for years and years, but no one ever seems to have them.  I'd love to trial it in Florida.  My Graveolens (orange) and Chanee have both recently survived 49 degree night temps unprotected, and I'm hoping that bodes well for them - but this one seems to have "all the right stuff" to survive here, if it can tolerate our soil.
Season varies from year to year, but usually around now, December-January.

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Unknown fruit? in Mexico
« on: December 04, 2018, 01:19:13 AM »
8 decades of personal observation?  :o Are you a centenarian?

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Soft cherimoya seeds.
« on: November 30, 2018, 04:34:09 AM »
Soft, and hollow seeds, are from bad pollination. I often get fruits that have both hard and soft seeds inside.

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Unknown fruit? in Mexico
« on: November 29, 2018, 04:50:37 PM »
Yes many bats are great dispersers of fruits. Someone sent me seeds of a fruit they collected from fruit droppings. An unidentified fruit they had never seen before. As far as Terminalia catappa being distributed inland, this is sometimes possible without animal carriers when floating fruits flow inland via rivers with the ocean tide surges. They float very well and remain viable for a very long time. The tree is also extremely productive.

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Unknown fruit? in Mexico
« on: November 29, 2018, 02:21:13 AM »
Oscar. Regarding the Jamaican Cherry (Muntingia calabura): It is termed as a HIGH RISK  plant for invasion in the Hawaii according to the PIER report long time ago. This is in the absence of fruit bats but due to bird disbursement, having many seeds in the fruit, through the gut seeds have higher germination potential etc.
Because of the absence of fruit bats in Hawaii, Terminalia catappa is termed rightly as not invasive in spite of the thousands of miles of ocean floor you have there.
Thare are zero wild populations of Jamaican cherry tree here. Invasive plant list has lots of mistakes in it. The birds here don't seem to like it. Even my chickens don't eat it, and they eat just about anything.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Unknown fruit? in Mexico
« on: November 29, 2018, 02:18:10 AM »
Oscar. The bats in Hawaii are insectivorous and they DO NOT EAT FRUITS. So your comment from Hawaii about  'Easily germinated and carried over by bats' doesn't relate to what I commented. Please note these North American West Coast Immigrants, the Hoary bats somehow ended up in Hawaii at 2 different times. The first one 10,000 years ago and the recent one about 1000 years ago. This is the only land mammal indigenous to Hawaii.
Your opinion Terminalia catappa seeds are spread through ocean waters is interesting.
Hoary bat food is mainly wasps, beetles, fruit flies and other insects which is helping the fruit trees in Hawaii getting rid of some of these pests. Over 98% of TFF members and clients unfortunately do not have your advantage of having only one species of bat and the insectivorous one.
I didn't say anything about bats. BTW, the hoary bat in Hawaii is extremely rare. Hardly ever see them. About Terminalia catappa, that is not my opinion about them floating in water and spreading that way. It's a well known fact.

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