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Looks like you have not yet added this one to your web seed list?

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Marang Climate? Ecuador
« on: Today at 01:46:06 AM »
Youíll just have to see.  In many cases when you grow lowland trees at higher elevations 800 meters is about where some start to not really thrive, but still produce.  Being so near the equator is an advantage. Iíll be interested to hear how this goes.  Pejibaye, mangosteen, durian, cacao, are among many species that really want a lowland environment but get  pushed tp perform at a higher altitude.
Suerte, Peter
Yes i think you are at 9N. latitude in CR? Being at 0 latitude is going to push the altitude up quite a lot from what is possible at 9N. There should be some kind of formula for this, but i don't know of any?

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Marang Climate? Ecuador
« on: October 19, 2018, 02:30:45 AM »
Jim West's place in Ecuador is at 500-700 meter elevation and he grows marang there. You are a litlle bit higher, but having been at Jim's place where it was plenty tropical, i would say that marang would do well also at your elevation.

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Scoop out, mix in blender, use as salad dressing, or mix with other vegetable juices. Would be great with tomato juice, carrot juice, or others with strong taste like beets or celey. Whatever juice you can't use right away you can freeze for later use.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What does a pawpaw taste like?
« on: October 17, 2018, 10:14:05 PM »
Indeed - needs both chill and summer heat.  It's the latter that prevents me from growing them here.  They're quite temperature-hardy, but even the least heat-demanding cultivars can be hard to ripen in for the example the Pacific Northwest due to heat requirements.

Pawpaws are adapted to continental climates, where it gets both cold and hot.  That said, there are California pawpaw growers (for example, Lagier Ranch in the San Joaquin Valley), although I've never heard of any growing as far south as San Diego.  You can always contact KSU (the foremost experts in pawpaws) and ask.  But I imagine chill will be a big problem (in the SF area, both chill and heat can be problems, depending on the location and cultivar)
CRFG president has fruited pawpaw in Santa Monica, southern California, not far from the coast. So there are types that can fruit without extreme heat or cold.

Wow really? This gives me some hope!

You wouldn't know what varieties the president has? Or perhaps where I can get more info on this?
I think i posted about it before. Try the search feature. Subject: Paw paw. User: fruitlovers. Her name is Margaret Frane, or something like that.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What does a pawpaw taste like?
« on: October 17, 2018, 05:18:26 PM »
Indeed - needs both chill and summer heat.  It's the latter that prevents me from growing them here.  They're quite temperature-hardy, but even the least heat-demanding cultivars can be hard to ripen in for the example the Pacific Northwest due to heat requirements.

Pawpaws are adapted to continental climates, where it gets both cold and hot.  That said, there are California pawpaw growers (for example, Lagier Ranch in the San Joaquin Valley), although I've never heard of any growing as far south as San Diego.  You can always contact KSU (the foremost experts in pawpaws) and ask.  But I imagine chill will be a big problem (in the SF area, both chill and heat can be problems, depending on the location and cultivar)
CRFG president has fruited pawpaw in Santa Monica, southern California, not far from the coast. So there are types that can fruit without extreme heat or cold.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What does a pawpaw taste like?
« on: October 17, 2018, 05:45:53 AM »
Varies a lot depending on cultivar. Had a choice type and was surprised at how good it was. Very tropical complex taste, with hints of mango in it. But most types need long chill period. If you are planting in zone 10A have to make sure types you plant will fruit there.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: How good does Carambola taste?
« on: October 16, 2018, 02:12:42 AM »
Like with any other fruit, there are some people that like it, and others that don't.
It usually doesn't make it to most people's top 10, though i know someone who told me it's their favorite fruit.
The ones sold at supermarkets, especially on mainland USA look to me to be totally inedible. No way i would ever buy them. They are picked way too green, don't ripen off the tree, and green parts contain harmful oxalic acids.
Here they get a very low price at market. One big reason for this is that the trees are so incredibly productive. So during season there is a big glut on the market. And a lot of people here still don't know what it is, so not much demand.
I have 5 trees, so usually have tons more than i can use. I juice a lot of them, but still don't put a dent in what the trees are producing. The quality of the juice is really quite good, comparable to orange juice. Should really sell them to a distributor, but hardly worth the trouble for the price they will pay.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Difficulties with pulasan
« on: October 15, 2018, 06:33:29 AM »
Vermiculite works well as its  in organic, holds water and  is easy to adjust how much water is in it.  The difference is when  things are shipped without being super clean. When  the seeds have some fruit pulp on them, or sugar and nutrients, fungus spores germinate and .the  Vermiculite is the perfect consistency for fungal growth and has nothing in it  to prevent fungus, hence its use sometimes in mushroom culturing. The moss although can mold,  it does prevent  fungus quite well even.if there are some sugars kicking it around.

One thing to keep in mind.  Vermiculite is a rock. Sphagnum moss  is a plant and  some countries quarantine/customers type agencies will not allow it in without your  regular plant paperwork such as phytosanitary certificate, import permissions etc.  So in  that regard Vermiculite by as an advantage.   Moisten it first, its bad to breathe in the dust.
As far as i know, the only countries that do not allow sphagnum moss in the medium, even with a phyto, are Australia, New Zealand, and Canada.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: what should I know while growing kiwano?
« on: October 12, 2018, 05:29:34 PM »
They're good juiced and used as a salad dressing. What i didn't like is how thorny the plant is. Has thorns all along the stems. Also it took over the garden. In tropics could be invasive weed. Big advantage is they are not stung by fruit flies, as are other cucumbers here.
For starting seeds use well drained slightly acid soil. Keep temperature and humidity high and well watered until seeds sprout. Very easy to grow given right conditions. If i grew them again i would use a trellis, rather than letting them sprawl on the ground. Too easy to step on sharp thorns.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Difficulties with pulasan
« on: October 09, 2018, 06:01:59 PM »
I have had good success with washing well and germinating in sphagnum moss that's mixed half half with dry and wet then squeezed moss.  Shipped pulasan many times this way with near 100%success.  We grow them in regular heavy ish clay like soil in pots before transplanting.  Check your pot holes. Some pots like those cheap flimsy black types sit flat on the ground.  If on concrete they tend to stay soggy.  If you plant a drainage media like chips, rock etc not an issue.  So maybe like Steve mentions, roots are too wet. Cleaning seeds well goes a long way, but is time consuming.

Thanks, I was thinking  to try with vermiculite to see if it can grow
Sphagnum moss works better than vermiculite as a medium. Sphagnum moss is very acidic (low pH) and helps to inhibit rotting. Pulasan seeds, like rambutan seeds are susceptible to mold. Main problem is pulp that sticks to the seeds is hard completely clean off, Any very tiny piece of pulp will start molding process. So it's really good to spend the time to clean them off very meticulously. Once they start sprouting the molding is not a problem.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: white sapote in the tropics
« on: October 05, 2018, 05:36:21 PM »
There are so many cultivars of white sapote, probably close to 100? Not surprising that some might be more suitable for the tropics than others.
Ajesh, what is the elevation at location where you grow your white sapote?

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Yes, you are right Oscar :) cuttings are faster but a lot of material is necessary... If you think abut seeds, hollies are usually dioecious so you need male and female plant  - not easy way
Wayusa take much better from cuttings than Mate for me. Cuttings are common way to propagate this species in Ecuador. But much decorative and I think easy for cultivate or propagate is Yaupon and it is native in US
Yerba mate is dioecious. I started with just one plant and propagated from that. So they all flower, but don't form any seeds.
I noticed when i Ecuador that they sell bags of guayuasa for tea in some stores. Had never seen it sold commercially before that.

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Well, if you're adding in non-caffeinated Ilex species then you can't forget Ilex kaushue, aka large-leaved kudingcha (I. latifolia sometimes used interchangeably).  Very interesting chemical profile with it too  :)

Is vegetative propagation preferable for all Ilex species?  I know it's the most common approach  with I. paraguariensis, but that seeds are occasionally used as well.  I ask because live plants are a hundred times more difficult to get here (unless they come from Europe) than seeds.
Seeds of I. paraguariensis (yerba mate) have a very short shelf life. Can be done if you get very fresh seeds. Once you have the plants much easier and faster to do air layers. Cuttings work also, but amount of take is low.

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Hi all
I keep hearing about this one for long time

Anyone have any experience with this one?

Thanks
Yes i'm growing it, thanks to Fruitdork (MicAh). What do you want to know?
Have yerba mate and guayusa growing side by side and both doing well at my location.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: white sapote in the tropics
« on: October 01, 2018, 02:14:52 PM »
Hi Oscar, yes i am in Ca. but i asked this question after someone in Sri Lanka told me that they would not grow there i thought that a bit odd  as i thought they was really quite tropical , there are a lot of us today in Calif. and else where that are growing things today that yesteryear   we where told would not grow here, but somehow someone finds 1 that will and we go on from there.
White sapote does very well in southern California. There used to be commercial plantings there, so no it is not a tropical tree. In Sri Lanka, because it is close to equator you are going to need some elevation to be able to fruit them.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: white sapote in the tropics
« on: October 01, 2018, 02:10:51 PM »
What variety are those huge Lychee tree's in Hilo Arboretum that go off every year?  Those can't be over 100 ft. Elevation or so...

Rainbow W. Sapote grow's slowest for me so it could be one more appropriate for hotter climates.

The elevation at the arboretum is less than 100 feet. There are Kaimanas, Groff, and a few others in there. They are not labeled, and i think some might be seedlings. But no, they do not fruit every year. I would say maybe one in every 5-8 years there is a good fruiting. Mostly it is dependent on whether we get a dry winter caused by El Nino. Dry winters cause stress as much or better than cooler temperatures.
Much better lychee fruiting occurs at the Hilo experimental station. That is at elevation between 600 and 800 feet.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: white sapote in the tropics
« on: October 01, 2018, 01:33:03 AM »
are there any varieties that may stand a better chance than others??

McDill does really well here.
For more information try reading this thread about cultivars that do well in Florida. http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=1073.0;nowap
Where in the tropics are you planning on growing them?

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: white sapote in the tropics
« on: October 01, 2018, 01:23:32 AM »
Oscar, please look around at other places around 19th latidue. Soon you will realise Hawaii is in unique position. Sort of coolish tropicals unlike anywhere else. Possibly influence of ocean currents around Hawaii,  not sure. Compare 10 days forecast Hilo vs Puerto Vallarta. Both coastal cities at almost indentical latidue. Hilo is noticeablly cooler. If it's sunny or partly cloudy everywhere else in tropics at this time and latidue would be 90 F. Hilo shows 84-85. You are able to grow all ultra tropicals along side those with coolish requirements,  something that would be impossible anywhere else in tropics with the same latidue and altidue.
What is misleading is to give thread starter a blank recommendatio without mentioning other factors.  Poor guy could have wasted 20 years growing ornamental tree like it happened to Luc.
Why don't you look at original question: :
"can you grow white sapote in the tropics? what is the most tropical place that anyone knows of them growing?"
We are in the tropics and we can grow them. This person did not specify where in the tropics they are.( And their addy shows they are in Calfiornia.) The tropics is a large area, and even lowland tropis is very different from place to place.
You make comparision of white sapote with lychee. But actually the white sapote is much more widely adapted then lychee. White sapote can fruit at sea level here, lychee can not. I am going by actual experience and observation, not something i read online, like you.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: white sapote in the tropics
« on: September 30, 2018, 06:35:26 PM »
In Costa Rica it is native, I think, and does best with altitude, like at least 3000í, better 5000í.  Itís called matasano.  We donít see it in the wet lowlands.
Peter

Thank you. That puts a cork into discussion.
Oscar, University of Hawaii has something different to say about lychee at sea level: https://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/F_N-2.pdf

My understanding there are four species were production would be highly questionable in wet lowlands of deep tropics: lychee, green sapote, white sapote and macadamias. All of them doable with some elevation minimum 3000 feet. At this elevation, many tropicals grow, but won't fruit. Around 5000 is strictly subtropical. Around 6500 in tropics you can start thinking about apples and pears.
Again what you say is misleading. No cork at all. Costa Rica is about 9 degrees north of euator. Hawaii is 19 degrees north of equator. Both are inside zone of tropics. But ofcourse your going to need more altitude in Costa Rica to get cool temperatures than you are here.  Right at the eauator you would need even higher elevations than in Costa Rica to grow white sapote, does that mean that Costa rica is not tropical compared to Ecuador?
Also i challenge you to find any fruiting lychees here at sea level, unless they are specical tropical cultivars.

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Works extremely well. I've never monitored its use in potted culture, but I was able to (accidentally) lower the pH to about 1/4 acre of my orchard to the low 3's with a couple thousand pounds of Tiger 90. The effect is temporary though. Three years later, the pH was back to the 7's.

Note that it also takes several months for the pH to drop.
3 years doesn't seem very temporary. Or did the pH rise gradually through those 3 years? Did you keep track?

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Achachairu Growing Information Please
« on: September 28, 2018, 05:11:05 PM »
Would any of the souther cali growers recommend growing them from seeds that came from California fruit? If so does anyone have California seeds for sale?
Don't think it's been fruited yet in California?

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: white sapote in the tropics
« on: September 27, 2018, 09:04:41 PM »
Hawaii may not be good indicator for those species hanging at the borderline between tropical and subtropical requirements. They fruit lychee at basically sea level my understanding. Lychee not supposed to fruit in real tropics. For DR variety we need to look at elevation fruits are coming from. Perhaps it is truly tropical strain.
What you say is misleading. Most lychee varieties do not fruit well in Hawaii. The ones that do, like Kaimana, have been selected over long period of time and are special varieties for Hawaii. And no lychee variety at all fruits well here at sea level. Because of elevation we do have areas that are subtropical. But at sea level it is plenty tropical here.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: white sapote in the tropics
« on: September 26, 2018, 05:39:20 PM »
how about the really hot and wet tropics like Vietnam or Sri Lanka is anyone growing them there??
They grow fine here in Hawaii, and it is hot and wet tropics. But they do better on drier side of the island. There are less disease issues in drier areas. But yet it's doable even on wet side of island.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Ota Avocado
« on: September 26, 2018, 05:36:18 PM »
@fruitlovers
A few years ago, I was planning on putting in a couple of apiaries because I rarely ever saw any honeybees around here.
Our citrus and avos put out a lot of flowers, but set very little fruit.
Then, apparently someone in the area began keeping some, as last season we had plenty of bees making the rounds here.
The citrus produced quite a bit of fruit last season.
The avos held their first fruit to maturity.

Since the eruption I'm seeing very few bees around here again.
Either the bees were killed off or they were moved out to protect them and have not been returned yet.
I'm again thinking of keeping some bees.
they do look to make a great difference in the setting of fruit.

I'm very happy with my choice of avo trees.
The Sharwil and Lamb-Hass fruit are very good tasting.
The Ota is heavenly.
I want to get as many from that tree as I possibly can.

My concern is for the flowering season coming up in Jan/Feb, or so.
I'd like to get a good setting of fruit for the coming season.

@behlgarden
I'm convinced that the SOx gasses have made a difference.
We have a few hibiscus that did very poorly over a 5 year period.
Since the eruption they have taken off, and are growing new leaf and flowering like they have never done before.
I'm thinking that the soil has been acidified much to their liking.
I'm getting ready to order some ag-sulphur to treat them with.
Yes bees make a big difference. I'm thinking of getting some, mostly to help pollinate the lychees. I get plenty of avocados even without any bees, other pollinatiors seem to do the job.
About hisibiscus, they are susceptible to gall mite. Some people think the sulphur has helped to control the mites. That might also be a reason your hibiscus is doing better?

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