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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Lakoocha
« on: May 23, 2020, 03:01:45 AM »
I sell seeds of lakoocha. No fruits right now. Male flowers only. So probably in about 6-8 weeks should have seeds available.
I was going to post to ask you about this, Oscar.  So only 1 1/2 - 2 mos for the fruit to mature?  I've got a couple of lakoocha that have been flowering heavily for probably a couple of weeks now (looks like male & female flowers) so I was curious how long for the fruit to mature.  Have you fruited the varieties that Mike T sent seeds of a few years back?  How was the quality?

Thanks,
John
Hi John, i haven't timed how long they take to fruit. That is only my guess. No i haven't fruited Mike T's lakoocha.

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Lakoocha
« on: May 22, 2020, 10:17:36 PM »
I sell seeds of lakoocha. No fruits right now. Male flowers only. So probably in about 6-8 weeks should have seeds available.

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Lakoocha
« on: May 21, 2020, 06:50:43 PM »
I grow lakoocha. I'm guessing you are probably looking at male flowers. They look like small orange round fruits, but are actually male flowers. They come out first, and the females come out later. Here is a photo of the male fruits:



4
Ok roger that Oscar.  All three photos are of the same tree in this example.    I’ll attach some other photos of the other trees which I think are g aristata
The imbe leaves are lighter green, bigger, and not shiny like the aristata leaves. The aristata leaves are pointed and bit poky at the tip of the leaf.

5
I forgot to mention they plan to paint the trees white for sun protection while defoliaated. Fruitlovers they say they eradicated the mites twice before once in the '50's once in '60's. It wasn't on Pine Island or elsewhere a few years ago. Perhaps not related but some have noted it was noticed not long after Hurricane Irma. They believe the mite is smaall enough to be transported by honeybees. I understand it is endemic in Hawaii?
No the erinose mite is not endemic to Hawaii. It was introduced, probably through plants coming in. Probably same as happened in Florida. It's widespread here. It doesn't kill the trees, nor does it do a lot of damage, unless the trees are badly infested. Once this pest is introduced it is extremely difficult to get rid of completely. That is why for very many years Florida prohibited any lychee plants or plant parts from coming into the state.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Cinnamon apple Pouteria hypoglauca
« on: May 11, 2020, 05:31:18 AM »
Found an almost ripe one at Fruit and Spice from same tree as pictured above and took home and put it in garage. After 5 days Felt soft enough so I cut into it. Taste: very mildly sweet, creamy, Sandy custard, if you really stretch your imagination you can make yourself think you’re eating a mealy, barely sweet apple with one tiny dash of cinnamon, maybe. It’s mostly a sandy creamy custard with mild sweet apple/cinnamon flavor.











That is for sure not cinnamon apple. Perhaps custard apple, Annona reticulata?

7
Once erinose mite is in you can't eradicate, all you can do is control. They spread over the whole tree, not just leaves or branches.

8
All 3 of those photos are imbe plants. Occasionally have hermaphrodite flowers, but those don't usually fruit well. Most plants are either male or female. Your flower photos are male flowers.

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: shipping seeds
« on: May 11, 2020, 05:18:13 AM »
Id like to ship mango seeds this year domestically, would i need a seed permit for this?
Sending seeds of mango in USA is illegal due to mango weevil.

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: The inga vulpina seeds are edible?
« on: May 03, 2020, 09:02:35 PM »
Congrats! Mine don't seem to want to flower. Are those from seeds i sent you?
Hello my friend! No, it was a plant that Miguel gave me 6 or 7 years ago. They take a lot to flower...
OK, mine are only about 3 years old. Some of my other ingas, like edulis, fruiting after only 2 years.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: The inga vulpina seeds are edible?
« on: May 02, 2020, 06:20:34 PM »
Congrats! Mine don't seem to want to flower. Are those from seeds i sent you?

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: New fruit, Talisia Floresii
« on: April 27, 2020, 06:17:04 AM »
My koloc starting to sprout. Thanks Raul.


13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Borojoa, Anyone growing it?
« on: April 25, 2020, 07:13:36 AM »
Borojoa has been moved to Alibertia, “borojó” is now Alibertia patinoi.  Victor Manuel Patiño was a famous Colombian botanist who worked in the Chocó area of West Coast Colombia, where borojó is native, it is not from the Amazon.  “boro” means head, “jo” is tree, ‘tree of heads’ referring to the shrunken head trophies of the local tribes.   It is dioecious but females can fruit alone.  Males begin to flower before females, hence when they begin to flower one gets males, females later.  Protein content is low, phosphorus is one of the highest of any fruit.   it has a considerable reputation in Colombia and Ecuador as a tonic, panacea, and aphrodisiac.   in the 1970’s, before internet and social media, in a very few years it went from a fruit known only in the isolated Chocó area, to one of the most popular in Colombia because of that reputation.
Hi Jim, nice to see you posting here. Good info.
Finally got some borojo plants to grow and they are happily in the ground, though not producing yet. BTW, got my first taste of borojo shake in fruit market of Quito, Ecuador before heading out your way.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: paradise nuts
« on: April 14, 2020, 02:19:37 AM »
They grow faster once they are a couple feet tall. Watch out as they are susceptible to root rot. Plant in soil that drains very fast.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mangos in Hamakua, Hawaii
« on: April 09, 2020, 10:45:27 PM »
I have an orchard in Hamakua. Have been testing over 50 varieties for around 20 years. My orchard is right at sea level, so in a much better location for producing mangoes than yours. Sorry to tell you but you are probably in one of the worst locations in Hawaii for getting consistent fruiting of manoges. Your location is way too rainy. Honestly your best bet would be to try to plant some trees along the coast somewhere if at all possible.
If that is not possible then HiFarm gave you a good suggestion: Mangifera odorata (Kuini). However he is wrong in saying that species is the one that tastes most like mango. Actually Mangifera kasturi tastea a lot more like mango. I like kasturi a lot more than the kuini. The kuini has a very strong odor and turpentine taste. The lonly drawback with the kasturi is that it is small and a bit stringy. You should also try lalee jewo.
If you still want to try mangoes at your location i would suggest planting them under plastic cover. Maybe put them in very large pots, and in the winter when they flower move them under clear plastic. You will still get some anthracnose due to very high air humidity.
The cultivars i have found to be most anthracnose resistant are: Fairchild, Florigon, Brook's Late, Neelam, Nam Doc Mai, Rapoza. If you combine placing them under plastic cover with spraying copper sulphate then you could get a decent fruit set. If you are like most you will probably revert to buying Kona mangoes.
If you want to get scion wood i do sell it, check out my list at http://fruitlovers.com/Scions.html


Glad you weighed in on this Oscar, I was hoping you would.  I haven't tried kasturi yet (tree is still too young) so I was hesitant to say it tasted like mango without first hand knowledge.  I haven't had lalijiwa for probably a couple of years but my recollection it was very good but a bit different flavor from an indica mango.  The kuini I had definitely had a strong odor (but, like some other fruits, seemed better if you peeled it and enjoyed the flesh somewhere away from the peel).  There was definitely some turpentine component but didn't seem too bad (I've had noname mango here that was as bad or worse for turp).

Glad to hear that the clones I selected are among your best performers, Oscar, maybe I'll get a mango or two on rare occasions.  Year before last, I thought I had it made with my Keitt.  The first flush of flowering resulted in dozens of set fruits, even with the frequent rain.  A second flush came, again with frequent rain, with about zero fruit set.  Then the first fruits gradually began getting fungused, despite spraying and drier weather.  A lot of them got bigger than a walnut, maybe duck egg size and then poof, they all dropped shortly thereafter.

Hi John, for me the Keitt has been one of the worst with anthracnose. The whole tree got it. The results i gave are not really final as some cultivars have not fruited yet or have not fruited enough times to really tell how well they will do with anthracnose.
About kuini, they are better if you don't wait for them to drop, eat them a little bit on the hard side.
Have not had lalee jewo yet, but have heard from others that they are pretty good.
I'm really fond of the kasturis. They have an intense mango taste, produce very well and very consistenty. Now if we could just find one that makes slightly bigger fruits...

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mangos in Hamakua, Hawaii
« on: April 09, 2020, 12:38:55 AM »
I have an orchard in Hamakua. Have been testing over 50 varieties for around 20 years. My orchard is right at sea level, so in a much better location for producing mangoes than yours. Sorry to tell you but you are probably in one of the worst locations in Hawaii for getting consistent fruiting of manoges. Your location is way too rainy. Honestly your best bet would be to try to plant some trees along the coast somewhere if at all possible.
If that is not possible then HiFarm gave you a good suggestion: Mangifera odorata (Kuini). However he is wrong in saying that species is the one that tastes most like mango. Actually Mangifera kasturi tastea a lot more like mango. I like kasturi a lot more than the kuini. The kuini has a very strong odor and turpentine taste. The lonly drawback with the kasturi is that it is small and a bit stringy. You should also try lalee jewo.
If you still want to try mangoes at your location i would suggest planting them under plastic cover. Maybe put them in very large pots, and in the winter when they flower move them under clear plastic. You will still get some anthracnose due to very high air humidity.
The cultivars i have found to be most anthracnose resistant are: Fairchild, Florigon, Brook's Late, Neelam, Nam Doc Mai, Rapoza. If you combine placing them under plastic cover with spraying copper sulphate then you could get a decent fruit set. If you are like most you will probably revert to buying Kona mangoes.
If you want to get scion wood i do sell it, check out my list at http://fruitlovers.com/Scions.html

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Marang in subtropics
« on: April 08, 2020, 01:27:19 AM »
freese will kill it. You could try protecting it during witner

18
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Phalsa
« on: April 04, 2020, 03:45:17 AM »
Have fresh phalsa seeds available right now. Please order from my seed page: http://fruitlovers.com/seedlist.html
It shows as unavailable on the seed page, but just ignore that, haven't had time to change it.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What fruit is this ???
« on: April 02, 2020, 06:17:37 PM »
It's a papaya that had a hard life.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Will White Sapote produce in tropics?
« on: April 02, 2020, 06:15:23 PM »
White Sapote is an amazing tasting fruit.
The best taste description I can come up with is Pear flan. Sweet and silky smooth.
Just dehydrated some for the first time so good.
I farm in small town sized yards and have multiple fruiting tree’s in each yard now.
So productive and delicious.
The first fruit I ever tries was in Florida outside Kampong and I thought it was terrible.
This has happened to me a number of times with various fruits , and then you try a really good one and it flips your view. I try to always be open to trying a fruit again if I didn’t like it the first time.
Climate and cultivar matters as well as many other factors.
I agree, it's one of my favorite fruits. Lowland tropics not the best place to grow them, but worth a try for people that really like them.

21
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Phalsa
« on: April 02, 2020, 01:47:06 AM »
I saw plants with fruits at evergreen nursery in carmel valley in san diego last year so it can definitely fruit in so cal.

-FruitFool
Yes it's a subtropical plant, so should do fine in S. California.

22
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Phalsa
« on: March 31, 2020, 03:05:17 AM »
Most probably will come back. This is a bush that is normally pruned way back in winter, and flushes out new growth in spring.

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Will White Sapote produce in tropics?
« on: March 31, 2020, 03:03:17 AM »
White sapote fruits fine in Hawaii, both on dry and wet side of the island. Dry side is better, less diseases. Also tends to do better at higher elevations than on the coast. This fruit can be heavenly good if you get the right cultivar.

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Patinoa almirajo anyone growing it?
« on: March 26, 2020, 10:46:08 PM »
Tastes like Durian?  Not much info on this fruit but definitely seems worth testing it’s cold tolerance and trying to grow it from seeds even though it may never Fruit.  Thanks Oscar.
Jim West told me they taste somewhat similar to canistel, but moister. The plants are quite vigorous, at least here. The leaves are big and round, similar to matisia cordata (chupa chupa).

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Will these seeds germinate?
« on: March 26, 2020, 10:42:22 PM »
Would the Willughbeia seeds do better if sprayed/soaked in hydrogen peroxide or a fungicide before shipping? One Willughbeia seed seemed to try to sprout, but while one side split open the other rotted. I don’t have much hope for the nephelium, durio Oxleyanus, and Xanthophyllum, all are becoming soft and moldy. At least the baccaurea and a durio kutejensis are germinating, and langsat aren’t moldy. The seller promised to replace the seeds when I make my next order (next year), so I’ll be able to try again. I knew there was risk in the seeds dying in transit, but of course knowing me I’ll order even more next year!
Yes willoughbeia would probably do better if treated with fungicide before mailing. I would also suggest using express mail service. Even with that mail from most of Borneo to USA takes 2 weeks, without it 3 weeks. In high temperature areas that is a very long time for them to sit around.

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