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Messages - hawkfish007

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1
Frank has Amrapali and Sindheri scions for sale. He is a wealth of knowledge on growing mangoes in SoCal. I always had good results with his scions.

http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=39483.0

2

Can anyone chime in if chunky perlite or stone will serve the same purpose as pumice? I can't seem to find a good source locally.

Benefit of using pumice is that it can hold moisture out of the three while providing other benefits. Perlite will provide aeration, will help to reduce compaction but it tends to float up due to its weight. I am guessing rocks will provide some aeration and will help to reduce compaction as well. Pumice will definitely help during our 100+F days by retaining moisture, but will never degrade or create anaerobic condition. I stocked up on pumice for $9/50 lb bag in the past from zenhydro.

Makes an abundance of sense - I think I found a good source here in SB and will be doing the same, 50lb bag. I have 3-4 large mangoes to pot up - do you recommend putting them in a 25 gallon pot straight from a 7 or 15 gallon? I could definitely enjoy not having to up pot again later on.

I would definitely recommend to up pot them in 25 gal or up depending on their sizes. Because once you start using sand, top soil and pumice mix, it gets almost impossible to move by one person even a 15 gal pot. I forgot to mention in my previous posts, I also add 1 scoop of Azomite per Cuft of sand/soil. They are cheap at Crop Production Services ~$19/40 lb bag. I up potted my 15 gal Pickering in to a 45 gal pot so I don't have to up pot it again any time soon.

3

Can anyone chime in if chunky perlite or stone will serve the same purpose as pumice? I can't seem to find a good source locally.

Benefit of using pumice is that it can hold moisture out of the three while providing other benefits. Perlite will provide aeration, will help to reduce compaction but it tends to float up due to its weight. I am guessing rocks will provide some aeration and will help to reduce compaction as well. Pumice will definitely help during our 100+F days by retaining moisture, but will never degrade or create anaerobic condition. I stocked up on pumice for $9/50 lb bag in the past from zenhydro.

4
I do know Shwe Hintha.

Perhaps the topsoil was from a field that used to grow tomatoes or peppers or eggplants, until Southern Bacterial Wilt became a problem.  That stuff can hang around for years.  The rapid wilting looks like that, but could be from something else, such as Phytophthora fungus in the roots.  You might be able to save the tree with Flanker or Aliette, or equivalent.  While the tree is still alive, you can send samples to a lab for diagnosis;  don't send an already dead sample.

Thank you Har for the info, I believe you are correct, it might be from infected topsoil or Gromulch. I recently lost a lychee in pot as well after adding Kellog's Gromulch on top 1" from the same batch. I will get some Aliette (found it on Amazon but no Flanker) ASAP and try to save the tree.

Thanks again for the valuable info, I didn't know about Southern Bacterial Wilt.

5
Thanks, Ant! Where do you get your trees on manila rootstock?

Also I totally agree about mixing in sand instead of purely using bagged garden soil, which is mostly forest products, which decompose/rot over time and will eventually kill the tree. I've had really good results with mixing in sand to my native soil along with worm castings and some peat moss. Peat moss decompose quite slowly compared to tree products and is one of the best mediums for moisture retention. It's really helpful since sand drains most of the water. The only downside to sand is that it's super heavy.

I stopped using peat moss in sand and soil mix for mangoes. I now use pumice rocks for mangoes that are in pots and under sun whole day to help retain water. But the mix does make the pot super heavy. I apply gromulch and worm casting on the top 1-2Ē only. This method has been working well for me. BTW, crop services sells 30 lbs worm gold plus for $19 plus tax.

Thanks for the tip! Is there a reason why you don't go for peat moss? And where do you get your pumice rocks? I've been wondering about the best place to get them.

I decided to stay away from anything that may degrade overtime because I wanted to keep Pickering and CC in pots indefinitely. I buy pumice from zenhydro, they sell 1 cuft/~50 lbs for $9, but they may be out of stock now due to covid19 supply issues. I usually pick it up from their warehouse in Irwindale, they also sell 50 lbs cottonseed meal for $36 as well.

Here is my LZ on turpentine in ground since 04/2019, bought as a tiny 3 gal from plantogram. It is currently holding a lot of tiny fruitlets.



CAC on turpentine in ground since 04/19, bought in a 5 gal from Steve @ exotica, he didnít up pot it and it was in original soil mix from Florida. It is holding a lot of fruitlets as well.



Lastly my grafted ST and DF on corriente rootstock grafted around 05/19.




Edit: Dwarf Hawaiian not DF, I may have planted LZ in 09/18 because I remembered it survived 2 winters.

6
Thanks, Ant! Where do you get your trees on manila rootstock?

Also I totally agree about mixing in sand instead of purely using bagged garden soil, which is mostly forest products, which decompose/rot over time and will eventually kill the tree. I've had really good results with mixing in sand to my native soil along with worm castings and some peat moss. Peat moss decompose quite slowly compared to tree products and is one of the best mediums for moisture retention. It's really helpful since sand drains most of the water. The only downside to sand is that it's super heavy.

I stopped using peat moss in sand and soil mix for mangoes. I now use pumice rocks for mangoes that are in pots and under sun whole day to help retain water. But the mix does make the pot super heavy. I apply gromulch and worm casting on the top 1-2Ē only. This method has been working well for me. BTW, crop services sells 30 lbs worm gold plus for $19 plus tax.

7
I had good luck with mangoes on turpentine rootstock. I have CAC, LZ, Pickering, CC, Malika, Glenn, and VP on turpentine that are doing excellent.  Here is my Pickering and CC on turpentine in pots. I can take some pictures tomorrow and post. I found that mangoes on turpentine I lost are due to my own fault. When I started I only used potting soil for potted trees, and used mulch to plant in ground. As a result I lost those trees. Now that I have switched to sand and topsoil mix only, I haven't lost anymore. Unfortunately, I still have some trees in potting soil only and they are on their way out.

Pickering and CC in sand and topsoil mix.



Very intetesting.. Maybe that's why I lost my Pickering and Little Gem. I used organic garden soil. Do you think it will work if I use all purpose sand from HD mixed with garden soil (is it the same with top soil?).

That's what I use Quikrete all purpose soil and regular top soil in 50:50 ratio. For inground trees, just native soil. If I knew or used this mix when I started, I wouldn't have lost so many trees.
Thank you! My native soil is not completely clay, but a little dense. Do you think it will work better if I mixed a little bit sand with my native soil?

Adding sand to native soil should be ok and wouldn't be detrimental to trees. Apply generous amount of mulch around the tree away from trunk, and your soil profile will improve over time. One thing I forgot to mention, it is best to get a tree that hasn't been up potted locally at the nurseries since most nurseries use potting soil based mix to up pot to keep weight of the tree low and to water less frequently. Not to mention to make more $. I found mangoes that is in Florida sand and soil mix does well when planted directly in native soil, or sand and soil mix in pot.

8
I had good luck with mangoes on turpentine rootstock. I have CAC, LZ, Pickering, CC, Malika, Glenn, and VP on turpentine that are doing excellent.  Here is my Pickering and CC on turpentine in pots. I can take some pictures tomorrow and post. I found that mangoes on turpentine I lost are due to my own fault. When I started I only used potting soil for potted trees, and used mulch to plant in ground. As a result I lost those trees. Now that I have switched to sand and topsoil mix only, I haven't lost anymore. Unfortunately, I still have some trees in potting soil only and they are on their way out.

Pickering and CC in sand and topsoil mix.



Very intetesting.. Maybe that's why I lost my Pickering and Little Gem. I used organic garden soil. Do you think it will work if I use all purpose sand from HD mixed with garden soil (is it the same with top soil?).

That's what I use Quikrete all purpose soil and regular top soil in 50:50 ratio. For inground trees, just native soil. If I knew or used this mix when I started, I wouldn't have lost so many trees.

Edit: all purpose sand

9
I had good luck with mangoes on turpentine rootstock. I have CAC, LZ, Pickering, CC, Malika, Glenn, and VP on turpentine that are doing excellent.  Here is my Pickering and CC on turpentine in pots. I can take some pictures tomorrow and post. I found that mangoes on turpentine I lost are due to my own fault. When I started I only used potting soil for potted trees, and used mulch to plant in ground. As a result I lost those trees. Now that I have switched to sand and topsoil mix only, I haven't lost anymore. Unfortunately, I still have some trees in potting soil only and they are on their way out.

Pickering and CC in sand and topsoil mix.



10


I am not familiar with 'Raw Honey.'

Photo 1:  Looks like an admirable setup!  How many hours of direct sunlight?  What is in the soil mix?  Do you use city water?

Photo 2:  I have never seen that double-row of dots on mango leaves.

#1 It gets direct sunlight till 3 pm or so. It was in potting soil in a 15 gal pot, but when I transplanted in RB panels I used sand and
topsoil mix to fill the panels (used ~3 cuft). I use dechlorinated city water with a whole house GAC filter.

#2 those dots are probably abound residuals.

I believe raw honey is renamed Shwe Hintha from Zill.

11
I am still struggling with healthy mangoes suddenly drying up and dying. I noticed that it happens to mangoes with pencil sized trunk, e.g., 3-5 gallon mangoes. Mangoes with bigger trunk > 15 gals are seem to immune to this and thrive. I applied Abound and Regalia CG fungicides without any luck. If anyone has any insights or knows how to prevent this, please let me know.

Seemingly healthy Raw Honey.



Suddenly drying up.



Pickering with thicker trunk thriving.



12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: dechlorinated water for jaboticaba
« on: May 15, 2020, 12:08:09 AM »
I am not sure about the age of the tree, I bought it as a 15 gal from Champa this January when they were on sale for $80 or $90. Watering should not be an issue, I could set the drip irrigation line to water it whatever many hours it needs per day. Hoping it will flower soon.

Edit: I killed 2 of my 15 gal Jabos by over watering during winter. I left the pots on saucer with water and it made the soil anaerobic.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: dechlorinated water for jaboticaba
« on: May 14, 2020, 11:49:06 PM »
pinkturtle,

I use whole house GAC filter from Lowe's to get rid of chlorine and chloramine from municipal water. It is rated for 600,000 gallons. It has 3/4" inlet and outlet and very easy to install before irrigation line.

https://www.lowes.com/pd/A-O-Smith-Single-Stage-7-GPM-GAC-Whole-House-Water-Filtration-System/1000559417

Here is my recently transplanted Jabo from a 15 gal pot.



14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Tamaraca Mango
« on: May 14, 2020, 11:26:30 PM »
Tropical Oasis Farms. They usually only sell to landscappers, they won't let you touring their nursery, but you can check their catalog online, then call to check their inventory and place order. They will have them ready for pick up then. Price wise they are good, but inventory goes fast.

I will check their inventory, thanks for the info.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Tamaraca Mango
« on: May 14, 2020, 11:20:31 PM »
What is the name of the nursery in Rancho Cucamonga? I didn't know there is one that sells mango trees.

16
I havenít tasted an OS or OE yet, but growing one OS here in zone 9b. It is a small tree and has fruitlets in every panicle, some are big pea sized now. I will probably have to pinch off the fruits soon to let the tree grow vegetatively. It seems to grow well in SoCal and doesnít mind turpentine rootstock.



17
Planted four or five small perennial peanut plants last year, they get  mostly morning sun up till  around 1 pm.


Looks nice, I am glad you posted some pictures. At my place, trees right of Jabo get full day sun, and trees on the left get sun till about 2 -3 pm. I will go ahead and plant those now that I have seen how they will look in real life.

18
Thatís very good to know. I believe the one I bought is sun loving variety (Arachis glabrata) and should stay around 6Ē without much pruning effort. I will planting them soon.

19
Hey Patrick, my mangoes arenít that big yet, CAC was planted in 9/18 from a 3 gal pot, and grafted ST and DF in the back was planted in 11/19. Perineal peanuts are in 1 gal pots. My plan is to cover the sloped area with the perineal and remove the landscape fabric as it fills in. I was wondering if it would compete with mangoes  for nutrients if I plant it inside the 6Ē  lawn edges  of each mango (there is a LZ east of the Jabo not pictured). I would be fertilizing the trees through Chemigation and granular fertilizers regularly.

Edit: Dwarf Hawaiian







20
I bought a few perennial peanuts from Pete @ greendreams to plant as ground covers for my mangoes and other sub-tropicals. Is it ok to plant them next to mangoes within the same brim, or they should be planted a few feet away from the tree?

21
I would like to buy 5 Kauai Sugarloaf pineapple slips. If you have them and willing to ship, please let me know.

Closed, found a seller.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Foliar Feeding: Spraying vs Fogging
« on: April 19, 2020, 03:40:25 PM »
I use the same rate in my fogger as is recommended for sprayers. Main difference is that the fogger can be an order of magnitude more efficient in terms of total amount of liquid needed. So rather than losing a large percent of liquid to run off, there is basically zero waste. Switched from sprayer to fogger several years ago (based on a recommendation of a hawaiian here on the forum), and never looked back :-).

Thatís very good to know. I was skeptical about fogger after seeing the leaves barely wet after application. I switched back to regular sprayer. Guess I will go back to using the fogger. I use ryobi fogger since I already had several batteries. What is the recommended interval for foliar feeding for tropicals, i.e., mango, lychees etc.

O nice I was planning on getting the Ryobi one. How do you like it. Does it shoot high enough for 15 ft trees?

I fogg my citrus tree with this which is on a higher elevation ~20' high. I used 4 gal solutions to spray all of my fruit trees with a Ryobi sprayer, but with this fogger I use less than 1/2 gal and I am done in 10 mins from mixing to fogging.

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Foliar Feeding: Spraying vs Fogging
« on: April 16, 2020, 11:52:13 PM »
I use the same rate in my fogger as is recommended for sprayers. Main difference is that the fogger can be an order of magnitude more efficient in terms of total amount of liquid needed. So rather than losing a large percent of liquid to run off, there is basically zero waste. Switched from sprayer to fogger several years ago (based on a recommendation of a hawaiian here on the forum), and never looked back :-).

Thatís very good to know. I was skeptical about fogger after seeing the leaves barely wet after application. I switched back to regular sprayer. Guess I will go back to using the fogger. I use ryobi fogger since I already had several batteries. What is the recommended interval for foliar feeding for tropicals, i.e., mango, lychees etc.

24
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / FS Manual Sugarcane Juicer
« on: April 13, 2020, 11:54:26 AM »
Manual sugarcane juicer for sale as pictured. Brand new, never used, bought from eBay. I opened it to check, but decided to get an electric one.

$100, priced for local pick up from zip code 92346 only. Please pm if interested, or have any questions.






25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: backpack sprayer
« on: April 03, 2020, 12:45:33 AM »
After trying out 4 gallon hand pump backpack sprayer to Chapin 4 gal battery powered backpack sprayer, I settled on this. It comes in 1 gal version as well, and battery is universal among all Ryobi tools. I use 1 gal version for fungicide spray and 2 gal for foliar feeding. It's easier to carry around and pump works well, I have been using it since last summer without issues.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18-Volt-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-2-Gal-Chemical-Sprayer-with-2-0-Ah-Battery-and-Charger-Included-P2830A/303365816

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