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Topics - Tropicdude

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / One more tree.
« on: May 27, 2017, 04:53:05 PM »
Will be in S. Fla next couple of week,  I might get another tree put in at my mothers house in Hollywood.   I would like to get one of the new Zill releases.   looking for something late season, and compact ( or at least easily controlled ).  disease tolerance is a plus, as these trees will pretty much have little care.

The ones I have been considering so far are:
Honey Kiss
Venus
Cotton Candy

Also something not so finicky on picking at the right time,    also any other suggestions is welcome.    there are some other varieties that have been mentioned but not much data on them,  M4  Kathy,   etc.

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / USDA Imports fresh Fruit Portal
« on: May 10, 2017, 09:27:38 PM »
I am sure some of you are already familiar with this site.  but just wanted to share the link,  as I think this would be useful to forum members.

For one,  you can see which varieties of fruit are being imported to a certain market in the US.  and even the current wholesale price paid. this might help with some seeking to find out a variety , or origin.  you can also see if you are really paying a fare price.

https://www.freshfruitportal.com/precios-frutas/precios-usda/

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Japan Mango Growing ( Video )
« on: March 01, 2017, 11:38:37 PM »
Came across this video, its a comical news report, but the host are visiting one of Japans mango growing facilities, and they do explain some of the cultivation techniques. subtitles in English.



4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / When do i know to pick Sapodilla off tree?
« on: January 18, 2017, 12:48:18 AM »
I have a potted Hasya Sapodilla.   it fruited for the first time, it has one tennis ball sized fruit on it.   I have zero experience with these fruit,  how do I know it can be picked?  do you let them ripen on the tree or do they need to be removed and ripened on the counter?

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Poor mango quality in DR this year.
« on: June 18, 2016, 12:36:37 AM »
We had the local mango festival last week,  I filmed a couple of days at the technical seminars,   but what I really wanted to comment on was the poor quality, of the mangoes available almost everywhere.   

Last years mango season was preceded by an almost 2 year drought,  but the mangoes were superb.  best they can be for their type,  Hadens, Kents, Palmers, were top notch. 

This year we did not even have a dry season, it rained on and off all winter/spring.  the fruits are riddles with anthracnose, are watered down, and/or have internal breakdown.  about a quarter of the fruit I purchased , rotted before they ripened.

I have had some decent fruit,  but  generally speaking its just a bad year for them.   I can only imagine what the late season Keitts will look like.  we will see how "resistant" they are to fungi.


The Kesar's I got from my friend were consistently good quality,  he grows them in a more arid region,  so this may be the reason.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Star Trek type Scanner -Scio-
« on: May 05, 2016, 06:21:16 PM »
I have been monitoring the progress of this kickstarter gadget, for about 2 years, they finally came out with their device.   its a portable spectrometer sensor,  I do not have the details of all its capabilities. but from what I understand, you can make your own applets,  for example scan one item, and scan another and see the difference.

I have seen examples of it used for scanning fruit and veggies at supermarkets, to determine ripeness or chemicals.   you can also use it to identify medications, and can even tell the difference between a generic medication and originals,  ( I assume its sensitive enough to detect the slight differences )

So I wonder if this would be useful for the garden community,  would it be possible to scan leaves, and check for nutritional deficiencies?  what about Identifying varieties? or would there be too much variations due to nutrients and climate etc?    or maybe for breeding to quickly determine if one cultivar crossed with another? anyway will be interesting to see where this leads.

https://www.consumerphysics.com/myscio/technology

Soon after writing this I came across some Q&A, seems it wont work for plant identification at this point.  too bad.  but this is just a first generation pocket sized unit, so maybe eventually we will get what we really want.

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Odd hybrid approach graft technique ( video ).
« on: December 21, 2015, 02:09:05 AM »
Came across this video,  I have not seen approach grafts done like this before,   where the root stock bottom part is grafted to the donor plant.  another shot shows multiple roots being grafted to a big branch.    would be similar to air layering but with multiple root stocks.  unlike air layering I would think these would have excellent root systems once established. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAWDQuRVRWY
https://youtu.be/AAWDQuRVRWY

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Flacourtia rukam / indica
« on: October 31, 2015, 02:09:59 PM »
While in Florida I had the chance to visit Fruit and Spice park,  not much in season in October, but did come across a loaded Rukam.  I was much impressed by the fruit.  I had tried governor's plum in the DR ( indica ) which were ok, bit on the sour side.   but these Rukam from fruit and spice park,   tasted just like regular plums,  texture, size and color being the main difference.   

I also like the fact that, you could eat them skin and all.

Not much chat on these in this forum,  anyone else have experience with them. or have them growing?   I have what I think is a governors plum in a container,  been there for 5 years or so, I think flowered once, produced no fruit.   do they require pollinator?  or is my tree just too young still?

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Mango Mania ( Tv News report , video )
« on: July 18, 2015, 12:55:41 PM »
So does this mean the folks on the west coast of Florida are in for a treat?  ;) :P


https://youtu.be/WluGFkjdHGw
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WluGFkjdHGw

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Zill varieties.
« on: July 02, 2015, 11:23:32 PM »
I keep hearing of all the new great Zill varieties,  and in different threads you get some description here and a little there.  I know a few of the members here have experience or have first hand knowledge of all the new varieties. 

My request is that you folks "in the know"  list all the new varieties, and their traits,

Disease resistance
Vigor
Precocity
Tree growth
Fruit taste
Fruit firmness
Fruit size
fruit color when ripe
Shelf Life
And availability status.

This would be a good reference for anyone considering getting a new Zill  tree,  it could be started as a new thread.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Old varieties historical find, need help.
« on: June 17, 2015, 04:24:27 PM »
Ok Mango Historians, I need your help here.

I have been involved with the local Mango board in the Dominican Republic.

Back in 1966 they imported named varieties from Florida ( Fairchild Gardens ) this was the first variety plantation in this country.

Largely abandoned,  the trees were allowed to grow wild. and are HUGE,  we plan on rejuvenating the trees, cleaning the place up, and making a edible fruit park for the public.

anyway, I am trying to ID some of these fruit names,  Noris Ledesma sent us the original list from 1966.   some were sent as grafted trees, others, as seeds, and some seedlings.

The ID problem  I am having is that some of these were sent with original ID and not common CV names.   For example,  I was able to find old records, that state that   Haden X Carabao #1 is Simmonds Mango.    But I also have a Haden X Carabao #3,  which I have not been able to confirm,  I think it could be Edward, but not 100% sure.

Here is the list.

Aroemanis,  aka,  Arumanis and Harum Manis
Cambodiana
Haden x Carabao #1   ( Simmonds )
Haden x Carabao #3 (  ?????? )  Maybe Edwards???
Madoe
Ono
Sabiana   I cannot find anything on this variety.  maybe misspelled?
Chino ( from Cuba )
Saigon sdig    I am guessing the >sdig< stands for Seedling,  could this be "Florigon" ??
Springfeld
Tommy Atkins
Edward
Eldon
Heidi
Sensation
Pascual
Keitt
Irwin
Carrie

Some varieties were sent both as scions and plants in later shipments,  so some are repeats, I did not write those down,  I only mention this because of my suspicion that haden x carabao #3 is actually Edward, and I listed that,  but these are different shipments, so could be they used old reference in one Invoice, and newer name reference later on?

Any help on any of these would be appreciated.  trying to write up as much info on each of these.  most are easy, just stuck on a few.

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Tree Injection
« on: July 16, 2014, 02:38:58 PM »
Although this topic has come up in the forum,  its within threads that had nothing really to do with Tree Injection.

The Tree Injection technology I will be writing about is not to be confused with those systems used to treat trees for pests, and emergency application of nutrients. there seems to be a lot of information on these things online, and commercial products available such as "Chemjet" or "Arborjet" we are not even talking about root injections.

The Tree injection I am presenting here, is feeding trees water and nutrients directly into its vascular system, like an I.V.   the benefits are numerous, specially for commercial growers.

* No waste, all nutrients go into the tree.
* No contamination of ground water, rivers as no fertilizer is applied to the soil.
* Less weeds, because you are not fertilizing or even watering the area around the tree.
* Complete control over what goes into your tree , in traditional methods you are limited to what is absorbed by the roots of the tree, if Ph is off, some nutrient do not
   get absorbed, or some nutrients are block due to high levels of other minerals in the soil.  with tree injections you by-pass all this.
* Knowing the water problems in some places, finding ways of using it more efficiently is important.
* the limited experiments done shows increase in quality and production.

I am no expert in this, I am only sharing information I have found on this interesting technique,  Oscars experimenting with Injectors on his Avocado trees has inspired me to compile the information I have on this so far.   

 I still have many questions.  but this looks promising,  I would almost compare it to hydroponics for trees. but of course its not the same as we are not feeding the roots, but the other benefits are there. like controlling the nutrient solution. 

Although I do not see this as very practical for a back yard grower, I believe it may be useful in some cases.

I welcome others to add experiences or information on this topic.

Here is the video by Carlos, who is looking ahead and doing great work. in regards to finding ways to get around the Laural Wilt problem that  the Avocado growers are facing.




Original Technique for Liquid Injection in Tree Trunks
http://avocadosource.com/temp/OLD%20WAC%20II/WAC2_p199.htm

Mango and Grape Injection experiment in Egypt
http://www.google.com.do/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CCIQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.globalsciencebooks.info%2FJournalsSup%2Fimages%2F0906%2FFVCSB_3(1)22-27o.pdf&ei=YsbGU6OLCbDLsQTqg4LIDQ&usg=AFQjCNF2pzMrkHuUVZ-pU_SWN0asaj6LzQ&sig2=6A35U8uxrlc-t5PiehyfFw


13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / S.T. Maui / ST Maui Mango
« on: June 19, 2014, 01:02:44 AM »
Last year I had a chance to taste the ST Maui mango for the first time,  I really liked it a lot,  if you like the variety "Ice Cream" you will probably like the ST Maui.
again this year I had another chance to try one out, and was just as delicious as the one I had last year.


This year I took a picture of the tree,  as you can see the tree is loaded with fruit,  the fruits are attractive also.  they almost looks like apples.


But there seems to be a mystery here,   Fairchild website, said it comes from Hawaii, but nobody in Hawaii seems to know it.  where did it come from?, what is its pedigree ?   who else is growing this?  what have been your experiences?  productivity, disease resistance etc.


14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Minor elements for container soil
« on: October 03, 2013, 03:14:53 AM »
I was wondering is someone has some suggestion into the application rate of minor elements, for mangoes in containers.  some of the new growth on my trees, is stunted, pale and  undulated, looking at diagnostic sheet, everything indicates minor element deficiency.

Do not have a picture, but this document has a picture of exactly what I am seeing in my trees.  ( Fig 32 page 40 of pdf )

http://www.sqm.com/Portals/0/img/tablas_cultivo/mango/SQM-Crop_Kit_Mango_L-EN.pdf

I will do a foliar spray, but would like to add something to the soil, that wont leach out so fast,  southern ag, has some granular essential minor element, anyone with experience with that?


15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Taimour Mango
« on: August 17, 2013, 11:38:27 PM »
I was given two mangoes, and was told they were called Taimour.  I find little information online on these, they are listed in our big master mango list, as being from Egypt, and having a poly seed.

I really should have taken a picture, I regret that I didn't now.  but I will describe what they look like, they are very Nam Doc Mai looking. except I was told they can be eaten green.

sure enough these started getting soft, and stayed green. only getting a hint of yellow.

I do not know how to describe the flavor, they do not even taste like mango to me.  its almost like another kind of fruit.  my wife say it reminds her of a sweet Guanabana.   

it was interesting and I enjoyed it, even if it was not what I was expecting in a mango.

But I really wonder if this really was a Taimour, as the few pictures I have seen online and description,  does not seem to square with what I had. 

Has anyone else had experience with this fruit?

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Variegated Mango called Chitla
« on: August 10, 2013, 01:35:07 AM »
Never seen this before,  a mango variety with variegated fruit.




17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Your best mangoes this year ( 2013 )
« on: July 05, 2013, 03:35:39 PM »
I finally had the opportunity to sample many varieties I was curious about. some were very delicious.

Here are some "new ones" that I really enjoyed,  each one has a unique flavor characteristic.

In no particular order.
St Maui
Carrie
Maha Chanok
Hatcher

I had plenty of other good ones, but those above really left a mark.

Still many I need to sample yet. like LZ, CC, Angie, Dot. etc.

I know we still have some season left , but what have been the mangoes that have blown you away this year?

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Identify Pitaya
« on: June 28, 2013, 08:56:15 PM »
I have a Pitaya that I allowed to climb up the side of our house, naturally it decided to flower on the roof. 

Can someone identify the variety?  It was supposed to be a Makisupa,  but I noticed the flower is yellow, with red tips. kind of pretty. my other Pitaya just has white flowers.


19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Viva Mango
« on: June 20, 2013, 02:52:48 AM »
Found this on YouTube
Quote
Here's a sneak peek for WLRN's upcoming documentary, Viva Mango! Documenting South Florida's (and the world's) obsession with the world's tastiest fruit, Viva Mango is a fun, irreverent, and - of course - delicious.




If I can find the date and time I will post. or maybe someone else knows?

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Dominican Mango Festival. 4th update
« on: June 08, 2013, 12:32:17 AM »
Today I went to Expo Mango 2013.  this year the event started tied in with an International Mango symposium .


I will update with videos and pictures in a few days.

Anyway, this year had plenty of varieties, and I was lucky enough to obtain a few mangoes to try out for the first time.

Nam Doc Mai,  ( Flower Nectar or whatever its translation ) is exactly that, a very sweet, silky smooth mango with floral overtones. I loved it,  My wife called it "a very feminine mango", because or the sweet aroma, smooth texture, and pointed shape.

St. Maui,  Very nice looking mango,  very colorful like a Tommy.  it felt soft to the touch, so I decided to try it.  it was not 100% ripe yet, but this didn't seem to matter, it tasted really good, very different than the NDM, St. Maui had a slight pine aroma, but just a hint that gives it an interesting flavor. I would like to try a fully ripe one.

The got plenty of surprises at the expo, I did not expect to see Gary Zill and his wife, at the event, very friendly.

I also met Noris Ledesma she was a speaker at the event, extremely nice person.  the whole group did tours to some plantations and packing house, which I filmed.
hopefully I will have this edited and uploaded this week.



I also have a question regarding the St. Maui.  I noticed the seed was rather big in relation to the fruit, which leads me to think it could be polyembryonic.  does anyone know for sure? Poly or Mono?   

Update 3:  4th Video upload.

I finished the first of a series of clips, here Noris Ledesma, gives her opinions on various subjects related to commercial mango growing, one of her suggestions is that the D.R. should breed or select a signature variety that is well adapted to the tropics, and does not require chemical flower induction, like many varieties bred in Florida. which are more adapted to a sub-tropical climate.    another issue is regarding the Keitt variety, she says that there is good progress in the DR, but one thing one must take into consideration is that Keitt mango variety is being planted all over the world, and soon the DR will be competing for the same market using the same mango variety.



Second video:

A short clip of the varieties being sold to the public from the vendors at the event.   the big Pascuals sell for around 25-30 pesos  which is like 0.55- 0.75 cents dollars.
and the medium sized fruit sell for about a US1.50 a dozen.  One thing you may notice is how clean the fruit are in regards to anthracnose, which is rarely seen on Mangoes grown in this area of the country, salt breeze and little rain. make it the perfect place for growing mangoes.



3rd Video upload:

This is a video of the varieties display tables,  this year they covered the fruit with some kind of oil, I suspect this was doe to prevent flies or to preserve them for display, but I noticed that it had some affect on the coloration, causing some kind of variegation in the skin.  anyway, if your bandwidth allows it, watch in 1080p.



4th Clip:

I had the chance to visit a private mango orchard, the owner has 100 varieties.  the owner gave permission for a small group to look around.  my only problem transportation was leaving in 30 minutes.  so I had to rush things a bit.  although I may get another chance to film inside again, but now is the best time because most trees had fruit on them.

This place was one of the best kept orchards I have ever seen here.   the trees you see that are heavily loaded with fruit, are Keitt of course.



Other video on the way,  >plantation tour, 


 

21
I uploaded a video of some of my container plants that have fruit on them.

Grumichama... kids already ate half of what was on the tree.
Jujube, with pea sized fruit and lots of nice smelling flowers, bees are going nuts.
Guanabana, small tree, with 3 fruit. first time for this tree.
Mango, Lancetilla, has about 5 fruit, holding so far, if the fruit is half decent, I'll keep it, if not, I'll donate it to someone with more room. also first fruit set.
Carambola, about 5 fruit on it, and flowering again big time.  I tasted 1 fruit early this year off this tree, it was good.
Miracle fruit. not many berries left, kids love these.



22
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Angie Mango tree?
« on: June 04, 2013, 07:16:26 PM »
Just wondering who has Angie available?  in 3 gallon.  I will be visiting S. Florida in couple of weeks, and would like to pick one of these up.

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Pruning to extend mango season
« on: May 03, 2013, 02:38:37 PM »
I was driving down a road, and noticed, a mango tree with mangoes on one side, and flowers on the other.

at one point in time, the power company had cut back that side of the tree due to its proximity to power cables.

This got me thinking,   could it be possible to extend the harvest of a tree just by staggering the after harvest pruning?   in other words, lets say i have a big productive tree, after I harvest the fruit,  I could prune 1/3rd or the tree, then wait 2 weeks, and prune, a 2nd third, then, a couple weeks later to finish it off.   in the hopes that the next year each part of the tree would produce flowers at different times.

or will climate triggers over ride this?

anyone experiment or have any experience with this?

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Tropical Acres Farm
« on: May 03, 2013, 02:47:44 AM »
NOT MY VIDEO

Came across these videos posted on youtube, someone taking a tour of Tropical Acres Farm, in WPB.  anyway I found the videos interesting ( 3 parts ), some very mature mango trees.


25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Haskap
« on: April 12, 2013, 04:57:25 PM »
Haskap Lonicera caerulea has anyone grown these in Florida / Hawaii ?  do they require cold period (chill hours ) like Blueberries ?

The only information I could find for climate, is how cold hardy they are, but have seen a few post by people in N. Fla and Texas that have grown them.  and one article mentions that they may make their way to Florida someday.  one recommendation is that in hot areas they be grown in partial to full shade.  plus it seems they like humidity over dry. 






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