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Messages - shah8

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1
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Mandarinequat
« on: July 20, 2019, 01:35:30 PM »
sunquat is a mandarinquat--clementine-meiwa cross.

2
To me, a sunquat has the pulp flavor of kumquat, which isn't all that great, with the mild character of tangerines.  Not sweet, but very tolerably sour, and sort of bland.  Skin is sweet but thick and chewy-meaty.

3
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: citrus grown from seed shows more cold hardiness
« on: September 08, 2018, 04:01:30 AM »
Lamarkism, to a limited degree, and on the smaller scale, is a definite valid theoretical foundation for inheritance.

4
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Soon To Be Released By The USDA
« on: August 21, 2018, 02:00:37 AM »
Survival reports on various winter loss threads indicates that US119 is only marginally less hardy than a citrange.

5
My grimal grows best in the sunroom because of the issues with rust.  Outside, new growth is pretty quickly killed off.

6
Heh, Portugal ag commitee is going to hate Miguel for introducing a new superweed...

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Pawpaw leaf drop?
« on: September 02, 2016, 01:14:04 PM »
the latter.

My plan next year is to start fertilizing with high nitrogen fertilizer to get as much a boost from spring growing as possible, and for darkest leaves.

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Pawpaw leaf drop?
« on: September 02, 2016, 01:56:38 AM »
I had a bit of the same trouble...a nitrogen deficiency-like blanching of leaves.  I think many plants with soft leaves have had trouble with the heat, particularly at night.

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Alupag, what does it taste like ?
« on: August 03, 2016, 04:13:24 PM »
Now that I read the thread again, yes, the pic on the bottom is not alupag.

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Alupag, what does it taste like ?
« on: August 01, 2016, 05:09:18 PM »
The ones from the grimal estate are effectively sugar, with a dash of strong musky longan.

11
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Dunnstan Citrumelo
« on: June 19, 2016, 03:47:06 PM »
And oh yeah...

It's also patently obvious that there are different strains of varying qualities for each major trifoliate hybrid.

12
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Dunnstan Citrumelo
« on: June 19, 2016, 03:44:51 PM »
I view all such claims of great edibility suspect.

Dunstan and Morton both have comments about how you can avoid segment walls...I think it's just mostly about fruit being bigger and juicier and not necessarily better.

Again, we really have a problem with people talking about how inedible or edible these things are.  Citrange/Citrumelos/Citrangequats/Citrandarin etc, are all quite edible, for the most part, and they are better than many marginal fruits.  So people hype these up.  However, real citruses (kumquats sort of excluded) are far more edible than anything with poncirus in it, so plenty of people disdain trifoliate hybrids unnecessarily.  We keep bouncing between these extremes, and should stop doing that.

I mean, my own tree, when fully ripe in December, has no off taste at all, and the rind is exactly like an orange and is even a bit sweet.  There's no skunk taste in an otherwise orange-lemon taste, and only perhaps a little terpentine taste that diminishes as it goes from mature (tastes more like Ugli fruit) in Nov to ripe.  The only real barrier to enjoyment is the strong caustic aftertaste and plentiful seeds.  Were there citranges like this a hundred years before they were created, they'd almost certainly have become part of rural cuisines.  There's no reason to get excited about my tree, but it's not chopped liver, either.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Annonacin amounts in Annona fruits.
« on: June 01, 2016, 02:12:49 PM »
a tip for when eating pawpaws...be generous in scooping out the jelly around the seeds and don't to scrape off flesh from the skin with your teeth.

Pawpaw annonacin levels do vary by a bit by variety.

14
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Ornamental citrus
« on: May 31, 2016, 04:54:46 AM »
Ichang Lemon
Ichanquat
changsha
Orange/Arctic Frost satsuma


Frankly, your better bet are the trifoliates for ornamental citrus with low care.  They're bigger, more vigorous, and fall fruit display is better.  Not to mention the citranges having some of that orange blossom size/aroma.  If you've gotta go single leaf, then US119 is not trifoliate.

15
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: New citrus for 8b/9a
« on: May 26, 2016, 12:17:19 AM »
I know...

well...

I just don't think citranges, or at least the one I have are all that inedible, and I'll happily enjoy them, and I certainly think that the bitter aftertaste can even be thought of as appealing (for people who like that sort of thing--it really deepens the taste impression), if you could cut it down to a little bit.  We just compare citranges to real oranges and tangerines and limes, and they can't really do that.  That's why I want some real citruses, but I'd also like an even more edible no-protection-trifoliate heritage tree that looks like a real orange.

As far as Thomasville goes, I get the distinct impression that it's not very interesting to eat.  You also have to be careful to get a good strain as well.  Besides, actual taste of kumquat juice is simply not that interesting.  At least a calamondin has a tangerine aspect to it, but it's a very flat juice compared to, say, Troyer.  I'll take the bitter over what marginal gain of sweeter kumquat taste.  If it wasn't seedy, maybe...

16
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: New citrus for 8b/9a
« on: May 24, 2016, 11:12:27 PM »
Xie shan was always the obvious choice, if there was only one variety.  However, I'd also like to try other, more ambitious fruits that might ripen by early Nov or Dec w/protection.  I'll eventually try Page, as well, I suspect.

As far as I understand things, Morton is fairly overrated as the "best" citrange.  And actual reviews do not really have it as sweet.  The consistent reviewed to be best citrange is pretty clearly Rusk, and in any event, I definitely like the Troyer/Carrizo I have now, as that it has a very nice sprightly acid navel orange taste.  It has the caustic aftertaste, but no skunkiness, and strongly smells of orange.  It seems pretty obvious to me that the stronger the flavor, the stronger the objectionable bitterness.  I'd rather have the US119's sort of described flavor rather than Morton, which sounds much like an underripe but mature fruit from my tree.  US119 is also something nice to get the neighbors jealous with as that it actually looks mostly like an orange tree.

Why is it that most kumquat hybrids are so uninspiring?  The most useful of them are the lime substitutes in one way or another!

17
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: New citrus for 8b/9a
« on: May 24, 2016, 04:56:43 PM »
I'm going to try grafting Xie Shan and 88-2 to my citranges. 6-15-150 is apparently a bit more of a hassle to get, for me.  I will also get us119 and either root or graft to citrange.  I live in Roswell, Ga.

18
You need to get them bigger.  Especially the citrumello should survive zone 7 temps.

19
From what I've read and understand...citranges are more useful fruits than changsha, despite the greater edibility of changsha.

Anything that has more cold hardiness than satsumas just aren't going to be great out of hand eating fruit.  One of the real paradoxes is that most attempts to get better quality fruit wind up tripping themselves.  US119 is less hardy than a normal citrange, and approaching satsumas, yet, the fruits ripen in January.  Presumably you can still pick them mature, but no wonder it's the people from colder Mediterranean places that like this tree!  Orange and Arctic Frost don't seems to offer all that more hardiness than satsumas, but has significantly inferior fruit.  Etc, etc, etc.

While Mr. Texas is always too harsh--I think that Troyer is plenty edible, and a more useful fruit than, say, a wild persimmon or goumi.  It's just not something that you grow if you have real citrus alternatives where you are.

One thing I sort wonder about is that, at least for the Atlanta area, US119 is probably a quality ornamental.  Trifoliate orange blossoms suck, citranges are better, and the more genuine orange look/fragrance of the tree and blossoms really ought to fit many landscaping schemes.

20
What a coincidence, I, too, bought these guys today...

I did a search for blood tangors to try and figure out what the Ruby Tango is.  Nules, I suspect.  I wonder what the implications of citrus greening are for those people who bought the trees, now.

I thought that the Ruby Tango was quite excellent, and better than cheap Moros.  There was a bit of a floral wine taste.  It was pretty sweet.

Gold Nugget was basically just very sweet tangerine.  I wasn't really that impressed, because there was no nuance in the taste.

21
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Can I eat my bergamot orange?
« on: March 09, 2016, 07:42:10 PM »
I wasn't replying to Millet but OP.

Seville oranges are the oranges that are bitter.

Bergamot oranges are a Seville Orange and lemon or citron cross, and have aromatic peels.  They'd just be sour, with some bitterness.  Also substantially less toxic.

22
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Can I eat my bergamot orange?
« on: March 08, 2016, 08:47:19 PM »
You're thinking of Seville oranges, not bergamot.

23
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Oh Please!! Whole Foods
« on: March 07, 2016, 07:03:20 PM »
the main reply to this is that it helps disabled people enjoy their citrus.  Arthritis.

24
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: U.S. 119...who is growing it?
« on: February 20, 2016, 06:45:58 PM »
Thomasville doesn't really sound as useful as other poncirus crosses that ripen their fruits by November or December.


A ripe Thomasville is better than a ripe US119?  When does the US119 ripen?

25
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: U.S. 119...who is growing it?
« on: February 14, 2016, 07:48:29 PM »
-10 degrees C works out fine for me.  It'd be grafted on trifoliate stock, and that would take care of the fruit bursting problem as well.

Get it big enough, on trifoliate stock, and it should be pretty workable with short sub 10 degrees F situations...

I just don't understand why Mackenzie Farms isn't offering this and Xie Shan.

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