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Messages - jcaldeira

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1
I think it is asking too much to expect a nursery to cover a disease issue two years after the purchase.


That would be understandable if the disease wasn't one that was shipped with the tree as is likely the case with the Southern Blush. Nurseries need to be held responsible for spreading malformation because there should be an implied warranty that you're getting a healthy tree when you buy it.


Agreed, but the buyer should bear some burden to show that the disease was in fact present when the plant was purchased, and not introduced later.  Perhaps one's own pruning equipment spread the disease, or insects.

http://www.planthealthaustralia.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Mango-malformation-FS.pdf

2
I think it is asking too much to expect a nursery to cover a disease issue two years after the purchase.

3
Citrus General Discussion / Re: SorryI have not beeen on lately
« on: September 12, 2014, 09:00:26 PM »
Ouch!    Get strong.

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Ice Cream Bean
« on: September 11, 2014, 12:21:31 AM »
I planted a few Ice Cream Bean from seed in May of last year (beginning of the tropical dry season here).  Two have their first flowers now.  So, yes, one year from seed!

My trees are approximately 3-4 meters tall now (10-14 foot). 

The '3 year old trees' in the original post should be fruiting by now in Hawaii.

Although my Ice Cream Bean have been blooming for several months, it hasn't set any fruit.  Maybe they're just practicing for next year.  I've had several species of fruit trees fail to set fruit in their first year of flowering. 

Or maybe it's the drought.

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: The Cookie Monster Orchard Project
« on: September 05, 2014, 09:24:04 PM »
A great project!  Your hope your trees will thank you for the top soil with abundant fruit.

Will you do anything to minimize soil erosion until some grass grows in? 

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruits that can be frozen for later use .
« on: September 04, 2014, 06:09:02 PM »
Banana, papaya, soursop, mulberries.  Great in smoothies.

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: papaya issue
« on: September 03, 2014, 03:15:39 PM »
My papaya get these too.  Nothing to worry about.  It does not ruin the fruit.  My guess is that it's a mild wound to the fruit's skin, and the fruit scabs over to protect further damage.  I suggest not picking them off.

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Best Way to Consume Carambola
« on: September 02, 2014, 07:56:56 PM »
My carambola are a bit tart, and find they are great mixed with papaya:

  Papaya, in 25 mm (1") chunks  - 4 parts
  Carombola, in 10mm (3/8") pieces - 1 part

It adds a complexity to the flavor than papaya, without adding as much acid as lemon or lime juice.  Yum!

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Slow-growing Marang (Terap)
« on: August 31, 2014, 01:12:38 AM »
Yes, hair on the leaves.

I'm planning to dig up my worst one and return it to the shadehouse for some intensive care.  And then what....?

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Slow-growing Marang (Terap)
« on: August 31, 2014, 12:20:53 AM »
I am concerned that something is causing my few seedling Marang to grow slower than their potential.  The grew fast in the shadehouse while they had energy from the seeds in plastic bags, but when planted out they've hardly put out any leaves. 

They are in well-draining loam soil, 40% shade (under cassava that will be cut out when the Marang grows a bit), and I water it weekly.  A bit windy, but not extreme enough to bother Jackfruit or Breadfruit.  Soil  is pH near 6.5.  I have not fertilized them yet.   Here's a sad picture of one of my Marang:



Since my Jackfruit and Breadfruit thrive in a similar environment on my farm, I can only speculate that Marang has somewhat different environmental needs.  Wind, maybe?   Any ideas?

11
I'm sure it is the commercial tree trimming businesses that convinced the county to make it hard for people to use unlicensed landscaping services 'for their own good'.

Related:  When I lived in Texas, there was a state law passed stating that only licensed pest control professionals could remove honey bees from walls of houses.  Beekeepers were not allowed to remove the bees!   That law was changed two years later after the beekeepers got their sh*t together and lobbied against it.

Also in Texas, plumbing companies convinced some counties to pass laws that all fire sprinkler systems needed to 'backflow tested' every year.  So every year in my county every townhouse, condo and apartment owner has to hire a plumber at approximately $70 to have this done.  It's a 15 minute rip off.

Politicians are being bought.

12
A quick Google search suggests that only paid/contracted tree trimming services are affected by Broward County's licensing ordinance.  I'm not 100% sure, though, so contact your county and ask to read the specific ordinance. 

I found this:

http://pompanobeachfl.gov/pages/department_directory/development_services/urban_forestry_division/pdfs/downloads/Broward%20County%20Tree%20Trimmer%20Enforcement%20Brochure.pdf

Read the "Whom does the Ordinance Affect?" section.

In any event, it seems that the tree trimming companies have some county politicians in their pocket.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: How fast does Moringa typically grow?
« on: August 24, 2014, 02:58:29 PM »
Moringa is a very fast growing tree.  Grows as fast as Mulberry, Ice Cream Bean, or Jamaican cherry.  I trim mine at least twice a year to keep them low enough to harvest.

14
Papaya - better in the tropics
Sweet citrus - better in the subtropics

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Best way to water young trees
« on: August 21, 2014, 03:56:49 PM »
Drip irrigation is not practical due to the distances and hilly nature of the land.  Also, I'm watering only for the first year or two, until the tree roots are well-established and can withstand draught on their own.

The soil is clay-loam.

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Best way to water young trees
« on: August 20, 2014, 07:23:25 PM »
During a period of drought, is it better to water deeply at one place in the root zone, or spread it out with a lighter watering?   I water some of my one and two year old trees pouring from 20-liter plastic cans (no hose to reach).
 
It's not really practical for me to give each young tree more than one 20-liter can of water per week.  I'm trying to maximize water uptake by the tree, but also encourage deep roots.  The soil is clay-loam and soaks up the water quickly in most places. Most of these trees were planted 9 or 21 months ago at the start of the rainy season.  So, pour it one spot or spread it around under the tree?

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: forcing mango bloom
« on: August 19, 2014, 10:19:51 PM »
Potassium Nitrate works:


18
The sections will start to separate, and will have more yellow between the sections.  Ants are attracted to them when they're ripe, so if you ants, it's time to pick.

 It's okay to pick a few days early, as they will ripen more on the kitchen countertop.  Storing in the refrigerator retards ripening, if you want to keep them longer.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Papaya propagation by cuttings?
« on: August 12, 2014, 12:50:31 AM »
I successfully propagated a couple of papaya trees with cuttings, but don't think it's worth the effort.  I cut off side branches on old papaya, including the swollen knob at the base of the branch.  I removed all the leaves except the growing tip, planted in a sandy soil with compost added so it retained moisture but had good drainage.  They were kept in mostly shade for a month or more.

Papaya fruit so fast, and seedlings are relatively true to the mother fruit, so there's little to gain from using cuttings.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Recommendations Please
« on: August 10, 2014, 12:54:37 AM »
I think your plan to cut the one remaining original branch is a good one.  Cut it above the fork where the lowest shoots come off it.

In essence then you'd have a tree with three main branches, and the one main branch with several shoots coming off it.

If you're fortunate, the stronger roots now should cause your two new main branches to catch up.

Be sure the tree receives enough sun.

Thanks

To be clear, are you suggesting that I cut it above the uppermost fork (the fork in picture one just above the baseline of the house),
 not just above the fork where I made the first cut?

Yes, that is what I am recommending.  Just above the baseline of the house.

It wouldn't hurt to wait a bit, either, so there is more above ground leaf volume to feed the roots for a while.

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Recommendations Please
« on: August 09, 2014, 03:34:49 PM »
I think your plan to cut the one remaining original branch is a good one.  Cut it above the fork where the lowest shoots come off it.

In essence then you'd have a tree with three main branches, and the one main branch with several shoots coming off it.

If you're fortunate, the stronger roots now should cause your two new main branches to catch up.

Be sure the tree receives enough sun.

22
Citrus General Discussion / Re: True Or False
« on: August 05, 2014, 04:54:21 PM »
What is the scientific basis for heavier citrus being better?  Has anyone actually tested this?

Older dried out fruit will have air pockets, and thicker rind probably weighs less, and water lighter than soluble solids. Is it one of these or something else that makes heavier fruit better?

23
Citrus General Discussion / Re: True Or False
« on: August 04, 2014, 11:10:13 PM »
Hmmm. . . My guess is that heavier fruit is better, as sugar (soluble solids) is heavier than water and it might indicate a sweeter fruit.  At least the heavier juice should be sweeter.  That's my guess and I'm sticking to it for now.

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango graft
« on: August 04, 2014, 10:50:17 PM »
The graft is 3 weeks old. The scion wood and graft union were completely sealed in Buddy tape. I done a cleft graft with a new blade in my utility knife. It was a bare branch that is now budding out.

Thanks Adam, Mike and Clean!

Ed

Nice! and fast to sprout.

It looked to me that to top was unwrapped.  I agree with bsbullie that it's best to leave it wrapped until there is more healing of the graft wound.  It results in less water stress for the plant.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Australian Avocados
« on: August 04, 2014, 07:25:19 PM »
This morning I grafted 15 avocado seedlings with an unknown variety.  I have not seen the fruit because it's not in season now, but I was told it has a purple skin, unlike the green-skinned West Indian variety that is most typical here in Fiji.  Can anyone guess the type of avocado this might be?

It's unlikely to be a Mexican type, as it is very humid here.  I'm hoping someone of the forum might have a clue, especially our Australian friends since most foreign fruit stock here was brought here by Australian agricultural aid.

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