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2
Interesting. Lived in socal for 30 years, never thought coconut would be possible.

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: I am taking out my citrus trees in Miami.
« on: September 24, 2018, 10:05:51 PM »
+1

If you think it hurts to pull a Mineola try what I did.....I had to pull 200 citrus because of Greening in Kendall after having raised them for 14 years. I was the greatest citrus grower anywhere. I sprayed my trees every 2 weeks and yet all but 2 got the disease. Yes the Mineola needed a pollinator. Now I have 250 mango avocado and lychee. And 1 Temple thatís got Greening and this will be itís last season then Iíll pull it out after 17 years. And 2 Yosemite Gold hybrids from California about 15 years old that are somehow still beautiful and green and healthy. If you saw my present trees youíd know how perfect I took care of my citrus. IN MY OPINION THE SALE OF CITRUS TREES TO THE PUBLIC SHOULD BE AGAINST THE LAW BECAUSE THEY ALL GET GREENING WITHIN 5 YEARS. SO WHY TRICK THE UNKNOWING PUBLIC INTO BUYING TREES THAT ARE DESTINED FOR A QUICK DEATH. THE ONLY WAY TO GROW CITRUS NOW IS UNDER NETTING.

In Florida 80% of the citrus or more has greening? Who's tricking anyone? The new regimen is to fertilize year round and
a expect a lighter crop. For private people you can get more then enough fruit for you and your family? If your temple is producing
why pull it? Fertilize the hell out of it and enjoy the fruit you get? You won't get 300 oranges from a mature tree but you should still
get 90.

4
Healthy looking tree doesn't always mean sufficient minerals for fruit set. Sometimes, failure to set can be a mineral deficiency. Not 100% sure that's the case with your saps. But would be worth trying to load them up on micros and high quality N-containing fertilizer. Since saps are tolerant of salt, you can really go wild with the N.

My haysa gets helena's 0-0-6, which contains a lot of micros (like 15% iron from memory + a bunch of others in high amounts), helena's 90% slow release 8-2-12 with sulfur + minors, and Har's special mix (overlap from nearby mangoes), and irrigation twice a week. It's just slightly less productive than my morena.

The Tikal we have planted out in the street will barf out a ton of fruit if I fertilize the heck out of it but is a shy producer otherwise, despite the fact that it's been in ground for about a decade.

Fertilizer is king.

Yeah mine is constantly fed with compost and fertilizer. Blooms a lot with no fruit set.

I do too.. Very healthy looking tree, lots of flowers but not a single fruit.

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: I am taking out my citrus trees in Miami.
« on: September 24, 2018, 11:38:02 AM »
Miami soil is going to be tough on citrus. Most of it is marl, which is basically a high-ph clay. It lacks drainage, and it's essentially impossible to drop the pH. Horrible stuff to grow in, but makes a great base for footings, slabs, etc.

North of Miami-Dade generally has much better soil. With a good fertilization regimen and consistent treatment for insects, citrus is very viable.

I know a lot of the folks on this forum are afraid of systemics, but imidacloprid is a good option for keeping your citrus free of insect problems. All of the citrus trees for sale in the state of Florida are treated with imidacloprid (it's an ag regulation to prevent the spread of greening). That's why they look so nice for the first few months after you bring them home.

As far as I know, a high percentage of the conventionally grown produce is treated with imidacloprid. Moreover, it's the main ingredient in the more popular flea and tick products that we give our 4-legged pets. I don't think it's that big of a deal to use on your citrus trees, and it's certainly far less labor intensive.

6
I no longer do complete cutback for top-working. Instead, I'll lop off 1/3 to 1/2 of the tree then graft the resulting sprouts. The rest gets top-worked in the following years. This leaves the tree with foliage and allows it to continue to photosynthesize.

7
Mine produces gobs of fruit, but I keep it very well fertilized, with nitrogen. Has anybody tried feeding theirs on a regular basis with a nitrogen containing fertiilzer?

8
Nice pad. Given how the market is going, you probably already have a couple of offers.

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango tipping site looks normal?
« on: September 20, 2018, 07:23:54 PM »
Looks perfectly fine, but I tend to favor cutting it just below the end of a growth flush (ie, a couple of inches below where you've cut it). Cutting right above a growth flush causes too many sprouts.

Tipped the CC a few weeks back. First time doing it. Site is black and crusty looking. Normal?
In the future should I try to do anything different? 45 degree angle perhaps?
Thanks guys!







10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: ID These mangoes (Pics)
« on: September 17, 2018, 05:54:43 PM »
funny. I got mislabeled budwood from Fairchild Farms (harvest moon turned out to be something different). You'd think they'd do a better job of inventorying than that.

Please ID these mangoes, I got them from USDA and buy they also mistag or get things mixed when shipping.

This was supposed to be shehintha (swe-hin-thar) but its not.


This was said to be jahangir but it's not.


11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Gary Zill explaining his mango project...
« on: September 14, 2018, 05:56:31 PM »
Aha. That would be 10 feet apart in-row and 14 feet between rows. A little tight, but I guess it would work. Also assumes a perfectly square plot, and you'd lose a tree space per row (along the axis where you're staggering them). But the an acre has 43,xxx sq feet, so you have an extra 3k+ square feet, which would make up for most of the row stagger loss.

I was only able to fit about 38 trees on a 1/4 acre plot, but I used 15 foot spacing (both in row and between row).

I have 180 trees planted on roughly 1 acre. My spacing is 15ft.  1 acre = 40,000 sqft, 5 acres = 200,000 sqft, 1000 trees on 200,000 sqft = 200 sqft per tree. If entire 5 acres was used and the trees are planted in a square pattern, they could be planted 14ft apart.



Yikes!

:D Yep. That's why I was so excited when these new cultivars first started being released. I got coco cream and lemon zest literally the day they were released.

Gary was able to eliminate 90% of the seedlings before planting them out based on leaf smell. But he did plant out 1,000 seedlings and wait for them to fruit -- which is quite an amazing feat. I don't think anyone else in the U.S. has ever had such a huge mango improvement project. And, how did he manage to cram 1,000 trees into 5 acres? I think that translates to about 8' spacing between trees.

10,000 seedlings!  And the number of years devoted to this.  I'm absolutely amazed by the undertaking.

6ft actually!

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Gary Zill explaining his mango project...
« on: September 13, 2018, 09:59:20 PM »
Yikes!

:D Yep. That's why I was so excited when these new cultivars first started being released. I got coco cream and lemon zest literally the day they were released.

Gary was able to eliminate 90% of the seedlings before planting them out based on leaf smell. But he did plant out 1,000 seedlings and wait for them to fruit -- which is quite an amazing feat. I don't think anyone else in the U.S. has ever had such a huge mango improvement project. And, how did he manage to cram 1,000 trees into 5 acres? I think that translates to about 8' spacing between trees.

10,000 seedlings!  And the number of years devoted to this.  I'm absolutely amazed by the undertaking.

6ft actually!

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Gary Zill explaining his mango project...
« on: September 13, 2018, 04:33:20 PM »
:D Yep. That's why I was so excited when these new cultivars first started being released. I got coco cream and lemon zest literally the day they were released.

Gary was able to eliminate 90% of the seedlings before planting them out based on leaf smell. But he did plant out 1,000 seedlings and wait for them to fruit -- which is quite an amazing feat. I don't think anyone else in the U.S. has ever had such a huge mango improvement project. And, how did he manage to cram 1,000 trees into 5 acres? I think that translates to about 8' spacing between trees.

10,000 seedlings!  And the number of years devoted to this.  I'm absolutely amazed by the undertaking.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Jumbo Sweet Tart
« on: September 13, 2018, 01:56:59 PM »
Yah, JF you should graft out a tree and eval it.

Best to evaluate the budwood grown out before concluding it is unique. ST is know to vary considerably in size. Sometimes they are fist sized, others are like small melons.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Osmocote on sale (Amazon)
« on: September 13, 2018, 10:58:13 AM »
Yes, they can last for years.

Whatís the shelf life on these things?  Is it good to stock up and hold it for a year or so?

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Osmocote on sale (Amazon)
« on: September 12, 2018, 10:02:42 PM »
it was $15 a couple of hours ago.

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What caused this Longan to die?
« on: September 12, 2018, 07:28:28 PM »
Don't think it's due to girdling roots. Girdling root would cause a tree to be weaker in a wind event, or perhaps lead to a slow decline? Going from healthy to dead is really odd.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Osmocote on sale (Amazon)
« on: September 12, 2018, 07:24:47 PM »
Use it for anything in a pot. It's awesome stuff. I used it for years when we were growing and selling trees. $15 for an 8 pound bag (with shipping!) is extremely cheap. I was paying more per pound when I was buying it in 50 pound bags at the local nursery supply and driving over there to pick it up.

But you better hurry. Amazon will kick up the price pretty quickly when a lot of people start buying.

You guys use this on your mango trees?

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What caused this Longan to die?
« on: September 12, 2018, 04:48:02 PM »
Nuts! Never seen that before.

I see what looks like a graft line at the base?

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Gary Zill explaining his mango project...
« on: September 12, 2018, 02:55:29 PM »
That's an awesome video.

Note that he mentions the importance of calcium.

21
I heard that quality issues have been a problem for longer than the past year. What I was told was that Gary hasn't been as involved with nursery op's as he used to be. I think it's a combo of that and the booming housing market + booming economy which have driven up demand.

I think the issue can be partially mitigated by going to zills in person and selecting trees vs using delivery and having them select trees at random to go on the delivery truck. I haven't been up there in probably 4 years, so I'm relying on word of mouth and pictures I see on this forum of little spindly 3 gallon trees.

During the Zill's quality heyday, a typical 3 gallon would have 6 - 7 full flushes (whether branched or unbranched is largely irrelevant -- the point being that they were well grown and ready for pot-up to 7gal), and were barely a year old from seed.

Fortunately mango trees do grow rapidly if dropped into the right environment. But there were some serious bargains back during the economic downturn -- including bearing jaboticabas for under $40 :D.

Some of the recent trees may be small since demand has been so high following Irma and they aren't staying at the nursery so long.
All of mine were reasonable size and good quality but I bought early this year and heard the demand was very strong. When I was selecting there I went for diameter over all other factors, then if some had branches reasonably high I went for them, height was my last concern. Most trees I planted got tipped the same day I planted them if they hadn't started already.

I could tell none of mine had been in pots too long, all I did was run a knife up and down down vertically and criss-cross along the bottom to find anything circling and there weren't many, only toothpick size or less.

22
I haven't been to zill's in a long while, but I've heard that the quality has gone down over the past couple of years. When I was buying from them, a typical 3 gallon tree wouid stand 5+ feet from the ground with a trunk diameter thicker than my thumb. Recently, the trees I've been seeing from them have been much smaller. One of my friends who is in the nursery business and retails their trees has told me that they should remove the "High Performance Plants" from their name :-).

I bought 50 Zill mangoes direct earlier this year and agree about their soil mix but also could tell that there is a big difference between trees direct from Zills and trees which have been crowded up at some nursery and forced to run upwards losing leaf and getting tall thin and spindly.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Soursop SOS
« on: September 10, 2018, 07:30:23 PM »
Do they move? Mine are stationary galls.

Probably iron and manganese deficient?

My 2 "miami" soursops have the same issue. In my case, it's benign.

It does look like it's lacking in nutrition. Leaves are chlorotic.

Jeff, if you expand those photos, it looks like some sort of aphid-like critter in the center of that white "cocoon" like crap, whatever it is.  Do you agree?  I have a 4K screen, so maybe it takes the higher resolution to see it??

And it is definitely lacking something nutritionally.  Maybe low iron? 

Can you take a more closeup photo of a few of those things?

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Soursop SOS
« on: September 10, 2018, 04:24:06 PM »
My 2 "miami" soursops have the same issue. In my case, it's benign.

It does look like it's lacking in nutrition. Leaves are chlorotic.

25
Mangoes aren't overly picky with regard to potting soil. Your vigoro mix is probably fine.

Best mix would have a lot of sand in it. Mangoes love sand. Zills HPP uses sand + sawdust.

Peat plus perlite and pine bark fines works.

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