Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Cookie Monster

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 185
1
I've never burned anything with osmocote. The 12 tbs sounds right for a 25 gal pot. Remember -- that's all the food its going to get for 6+ months. So, that would be roughly 2 tbs per month of a regular fertilzer.

The annonas in my experience are not light feeders. They appreciate a lot of nitrogen, especially in the spring and summer, and don't produce well without it. The jabo, while salt sensitive, will produce way more fruit way more often if given plentiful nitrogen. One also normally wants those things to grow at a quicker pace.

2
Good news. Mine has had a weird problem with dropping 95% of its crop when bb sized. Was told that it is due to dryness... I had an OK flowering this year, but almost all of the fruit aborted.

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: ...on sapodillas
« on: June 11, 2019, 10:37:08 PM »
Most of the selected cultivars are either smooth and free of grit (eg, alano, silas woods, makok) or with a very tiny / nearly undetectable amount of grit (tikal, morena).

Oddly, though, I prefer the fruit of seedling trees with plenty of grit. The grit gives it substance and reminds me of a bartlett pear




Friend gave me this fruit from Nelsonís in ft pierce, first one Iíve enjoyed as it wasnít sweet overload more balanced, but the grit was persistent...questions for the forum whatís the grit? Are their cultivars with non existent sandlike grit? TIA

-Joep450

4
My mallika routinely get that as well. I don't know what causes it, but some mangoes seem more prone to it than others.

Hello all.. I have a malika mango tree that is 5 year old,this is the 3 year fruiting  :) grafted tree from PIN.,the fruits have grown big and tast great, I give them a 8 of 10 but my wife gives them a 10 of 10.Anyways :)
The fruit ones ripen, they have a deformation inside that sometimes half of the mango is gone, can this be a genetic problem? Or is there something I'm doing wrong when fertilizing?


5
I"m assuming that the large branch that you cut back had some damage to it, which caused the dead wood visible in the photo. I agree with Har that the grub / worm is simply chomping on already dead wood.

Hello again,
Today I was cutting a rotting branch off a Cogshall Mango and and found this worm (borer?) inside the branch.  Any idea what it is and the best method to eliminate it?


6
Generally, ilama and productive are mutually exclusive. If you're really meticulous about tree care, you can pull it off here. They are pretty hard to find though. There is a white ilama called "Guillermo" if memory serves, which Har introduced many years ago under Zill's annona breeding program. Good luck finding one though.

There are non-sour guanabanas. They are generally popular among Jamaicans (at least as far as I've seen here in FL). They seem to be true to seed as well. The one sold at nurseries is nearly always sour though. I tend to prefer the sour one myself (it's actually a good mix of sweet and sour).

If you like soursop, you would die for white ilama. The white ilama has a similar flavor, just a bit more refined and with better texture.

The anti-cancer thing I think is misleading. I remember reading something that indicated that annonacin is actually a neurotoxin. I would probably recommend refraining from neurotoxic tea unless I literally had no other treatment options. Just sayin...


Does the white Illama do well in South Florida? Productive? If yes, where can i get a grafted tree?

7
annonas can actually be a real headache :-). Either you're lucky or you're taking great care of them. It took me many years and many failed attempts to grow them. I found that successfully growing them requires leaf hopper control and really good fertilization and watering practices. Mango is indeed a set it and forget it type tree though... unless you get MBBS.

Guanabana grows great for me here, and the fruit is delicious. Tree is beautiful and easy to control. 6 nice fruit ripening, can't wait!

Thinking about either grafting other varieties, or removing one of my not so great trees for another soursop.

White ilama sounds good too, got a little ilama tree from Mike at TreesNMore a while back that is ready for grafting.

In general, mangoes and annonas appear to be 2 of the easiest, most productive, and best fruit trees to grow in SoFl.

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: PPK mango tree not growing.
« on: June 08, 2019, 11:45:24 PM »
LM is slow to start, especially if you don't give it nitrogen. My 5 year old tree stands a towering 7 - 8 feet tall. Meanwhile, my lemon zest of same age is twice as tall.

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Alano sapodilla pruning advice
« on: June 08, 2019, 11:42:54 PM »
2 years? That's nuts!

I waited until late winter time to do the pruning, as many other trees.
They take a long time to heal from the wound, and I would not put anything on the wound, the sap it excretes is more than enough to keep pests away.

Growth habits here in NorCal are different, temp swings are one of many factors, so late winter is the best time for us.
It begins around late April (Early Spring) all the way until early October then it goes completely dormant.

My tree is quite old, I think it's well over 10 years old, grown in a container.
Clusters of fruits on it right now, but the fruits take 2 years or more to mature, yes 2 years.
I think I have your contact number, shoot me a PM if you want to see some pictures or I can email you.

Waxy

10
HAHAHA

Quote
My yard guy said it was white fly

You should ask him for a refund.

11
smacke01, you have Mango Bacterial Black Spot, probably one of the worst diseases to affect the mango here in FL at the moment.

12
How much are they charging these days?

Hello Members,

Took a drive with the family to TT , To pick up some mangoes Specifically Coconut Cream .

I picked up most of the CC they had in a box , picked up some PPK , Southern Blush .
The place was packed , so we grabbed some mangoes and left , I donít like crowds 😊.

The Cc are hard should be ready in a few days canít wait to taste them !

The PPK where soft and ready very sweet a hint of lemon , good mango but I still rate my Pickering a much better tasting mango .






13
There are non-sour guanabanas. They are generally popular among Jamaicans (at least as far as I've seen here in FL). They seem to be true to seed as well. The one sold at nurseries is nearly always sour though. I tend to prefer the sour one myself (it's actually a good mix of sweet and sour).

If you like soursop, you would die for white ilama. The white ilama has a similar flavor, just a bit more refined and with better texture.

The anti-cancer thing I think is misleading. I remember reading something that indicated that annonacin is actually a neurotoxin. I would probably recommend refraining from neurotoxic tea unless I literally had no other treatment options. Just sayin...


14
Should be able to save some serious dough with ag classification. A friend of mine has a commercial lot, valued around 650k, but with ag classification its value for tax purposes is 3k.

15
Correct. That's what I was told by BCPA. I decided that it wasn't worth the effort and just annexed the lot and homesteaded it :D.

So I would have to sell the fruit in order to qualify or have a chance of qualifying.  Just a hypothetical cuz pretty sure they will never consider anything in the area I live "agricultural"

16
You can call the broward county prop appraiser and ask them about it. But, due to the number of fraudulent ag exemptions, they do require tax filings to show that it's a business. At least that's what I was told.

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Alano sapodilla pruning advice
« on: June 05, 2019, 04:29:15 PM »
Saps are really slow growers, even here in FL, where trees pretty much fly out of the ground. They do seem to tolerate salt, so I tend to overload them with nitrogen to push them along (and to get big harvests :D). Hence, 5 years to that height might not be realistic? It took my alano 4 - 5 years to get to 10 feet, and we have somewhere around 3x the "heat hours" (forget the term) you guys get.

Cutting side branches to encourage height is not necessarily a solution to pushing vertical growth. Those side branches do 2 things in your favor:

 - They help to thicken the trunk, which then permits the tree to support vertical growth.
 - They add photosynthesis, allowing the tree to grow faster.

Saps tend towards vertical growth, so you shouldn't really need to do much in the way of pruning of undergrowth. Eventually those branches will get shaded out as the upper canopy develops, at which point you would want to cut them.

As far as planting it out -- if it were me, I'd go ahead and plant it. Even if the soil falls apart, that will give you an opportrunity to inspect he root system and cut any circling roots (very important for long term stablishment).

Keep it well fertilized with plenty of nitrogen in a slow release form.

Definitely leave that branch until the tree is well established (a few years), at which point you can either leave it or prune it (along with its sibling on the other side) depending on how you want the final tree to look.

You could remove that green tape and gradually open it up... or just not worry about it.

Thank you Jeff,

In your opinion what would be the best course of action to grow this alano to a large upright tree.  My hopeful goal would be for this Alano to be 10-15 feet tall in 5+ years or however long it needs to get there. 

Waxy mentioned above that the tree may remained small or dwarfed if left unpruned due to the energy being shared among the branches and not more to the center leader.

your opinion and others would be very much appreciated.

Sorry I forgot to mention.  The nursery owner recommended not planting into the ground yet due to them just re-potting to a larger container just in the last 1-2 weeks.  I was thinking just wait until spring of next year to plant rather than planting in ground during the summer.

Vince

18
If it's not more than a small percentage of total tree canopy or if you're cutting branches that the tree is already starting to self-prune (eg, shaded branches), I doubt it would have a negative impact. Otherwise, I would wait til post harvest.  Leaves are a nutrient store, and forcing new growth would likely divert nutrients to new leaves vs fruits.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Alano sapodilla pruning advice
« on: June 05, 2019, 09:34:35 AM »
Definitely leave that branch until the tree is well established (a few years), at which point you can either leave it or prune it (along with its sibling on the other side) depending on how you want the final tree to look.

You could remove that green tape and gradually open it up... or just not worry about it.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Let the Lychee war begin...
« on: June 03, 2019, 10:04:46 AM »
Any with small seeds?




I just picked mine , they where almos5 all splitting , they turned out super sweet !
Great tree ..

Ed

21
Yah, and I'm still trying to determine the long term impact in different microclimates. What's weird is that I've had MBBS for several years (since 2011 / 2012 or so?) on a keitt whose entire crop would be lost pretty much every year (it wasn't until around 2017 that I finally figured out what was causing it). Yet, it's still been only a minor issue in my orchard of 30 some mango trees. This year, I've only really seen it on one of my LZ trees, where it's been an issue on less than 10% of the crop. I'm still not sure which of various factors has prevented its wide scale spread across my orchard: fortnightly copper sprays, keeping the trees well fertilized, microclimate factors, lack of rain this year, ...?

Nuts! I've never seen that.

Active bacterial spot lesions oozing gummosis
Me neither.
Looks really nasty.
Hope folks will post experience with limiting this scourge.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Are these maha chanok ripe?
« on: June 02, 2019, 10:15:28 AM »
Interesting. My tree gets a good bit of gypsum and it's atop a pile of limestone fill, but it still seems to get mild ripening issues (where the flesh around the seed is more ripe than the flesh near the skin) unless I pick it mature green.

Does yours have any tart to it when eaten fully yellow like that?

Nice looking maha btw.


I've not had trouble with internal breakdown with Maha. I make sure my trees get a lot of calcium when fruiting - maybe that's why.I usually eat mine when they look like this:




23
Nuts! I've never seen that.

Active bacterial spot lesions oozing gummosis

24
what kinda mango that be?

Mango trees holding fruit over here look clean so far.


25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Are these maha chanok ripe?
« on: May 31, 2019, 08:42:45 PM »
Yes. The flesh can be soft even though skin is green.

Thanks all! Cookie Monster- is the skin usually still green at the stage you like them? The ones I've had in the past were fully yellow when I got them.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 185
Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers