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Messages - zands

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Got Macadamia Nuts?
« on: May 08, 2019, 10:13:11 AM »
I have 45 or so macadamias, about 5 are seedlings. The rest are grafted with around 15 varieties.  Some seedlings do well, have good taste, good production, etc.  Some do not.  Lots of time invested in these trees to experience the final outcome as to whether it is a good tree or not.  Some have been cut down (shell does not close completely leaving opening for bacteria/fungal infection...happened twice).  Nuts fall, dry, and are easy to crack.  Fresh nuts are edible, tasting somewhat like coconut, not firm in texture.  Fresh nuts are more difficult to crack as the shell yields to pressure.  Dry, no problem.  A vise, vise grips, hammer works well.  There are special crackers with leverage due to the hard shell.  In no way are they like a black walnut as the round kernal comes out in one piece.  Don't know how or why you would use a dental pick.  Hard shell is a fact, but crack easily if they are dry, or roasted.  A very nice evergreen tree with few pests.  My biggest problem is tree rats that also enjoy the nuts being able to gnaw into the shell when it is soft.  Screened (for birds) rat traps in the trees are effective.

Vise grips are the best. A south Florida friend got minimal actually retrievable and edible nut-meats out of his Macadamia tree. It was tedious. The professional Macadamia growers in Hawaii + elsewhere must irrigate and fertilize maximally for larger nuts that can be cracked open and intact on an industrial scale.

But in good news pistachio trees have been over planted in California, rains have been good and prices are down. Down $2 from last year...at Aldi

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Got Macadamia Nuts?
« on: May 08, 2019, 09:20:52 AM »
I have been told they are hard to shell  and you will spend all day shelling them like black walnuts. So turn on your boob tube or (I suppose) NPR. Buy a steel dental pick or two on ebay to pull out the itty bitty pieces

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Be careful working outside. I was an idiot today and spent too long in the sun chopping a tree down and then feeding in through the chipper/mulcher.

All of a sudden I felt my heart racing and started getting light-headed. By the time I made it indoors I could barely balance myself. Thankfully my wife got me a couple ice packs and damn near a bottle of gatorade. Spent 20 minutes in a cold shower and I can finally move around again. Scary stuff. My eyes are all bloodshot and I'm red all over, but overall doing ok now.

Make sure you have lots of water out there and don't overdo it... summer is here!

Simple garden hose is your friend.
Your needed water is actually outside your body. Soak your head and all yourself with your garden hose. Might have to work barefoot. I do this every 20-30 minutes or so. _____  I practice what I am saying.

IOW work drenched and semi-drenched when it is so hot outside.  In South Florida and elsewhere.

5
These don't show up in this week's Aldi's online adverts (33321) or next week's...so not sure what is going on/ They are getting sloppy?
But yesterday I saw them in my local 33321 Aldis at McNab and University.

Remember that bypass loppers are lighter so good for going in for quick and dirty pruning while anvil are for thicker branches. Anvil will do all while bypass are not as strong. I have both kinds

Also sighted were anvil pruning shears at $6.99 for two in a two pack. These are good for backups plus have those Felco type springs that you can steal and put into a superior pruning shear. The kind that cuts through 3/4 inch branches w ease. Yup I had to do this three years ago in a pinch w my Felco.

Felco spring--- Go be a beggar at Amazon for $11...Ouch! ....currently  $9.02 at ebay...... https://www.amazon.com/Felco-33390-91-Spring-Kit/dp/B002A0UALW/ref=sr_1_9?keywords=pruner+springs&qid=1556492574&s=gateway&sr=8-9

6
This is the time of year my local Lowes gets lots of interesting fruit bearing plants in one gallon pots @ about $9 each. I hope yours is the same. Look for various black muscadines and LSU figs. Last year they had LSU and I bought some. Also- You can mail order Ison black which is a great Muscadine. My local Lowes also has guavas and bananas this time of year. One gallon/ $9.

Definitely look for LSU figs at Lowes.

7
Red banana but longan when putting out panicles and fruits. Not that I have Longan. Lychee was a fail for me. Too much calcium ph in the soil. A neighbor has a lychee that has not grown in 7 years but I see zero mulch and mostly likely zero fert/ This house previously had many papaya outside.

8
I had a good laugh last time I picked up. On the roadside were six bags of nice live oak leaves raked up. The oak leaves were stuffed into a used plastic bag of purchased mulch. To me, the bags had been refilled with mulch for free.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4JnEyHDOkQU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5hATTxwBaE



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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Avocado 24/7 Thread
« on: February 28, 2019, 09:00:25 AM »
I understand about Mexico's production but also that Aldi has a long standing use for certain fruits as "Loss Leaders" to get customers in the door. My wife used to always take the Aldi sale sheet to Wal Mart and use their price match policy to cherry pick every loss leader in town.

Aldi has been running all kinds of amusing loss leaders for years. You can go on line to see your local Aldi loss leaders for this week.
Anyways...Aldis has been loss leading on Mexican Hass 5-6 weeks this year (season going back to December 2018) at 49¢ and 39¢ each and customers have been raiding the shipping boxes put out there.

This says to me there is Mexican Hass over production, at least this year. Meanwhile sad ol Publix has Hass at 99¢

10
I have been collecting yard waste in nearby neighborhoods. Homeowners begin putting prunings, palm fronds, etc by the roadside on weekends and the county waste contractor picks up on Wednesday. The stuff is rough even though the pickup people have specs for what they will take. I usually pass on huge piles and pick up stuff bundled with string, in trash bags, or easy palm fronds. Sometimes I get 4-8 pickup truckloads in a week. It doesn't look 'neat' like chipped mulch, but I hope it will last and cover soil. I realy have found that a banana mat, after the suckers proliferate generates a lot of organic matter.

I don't have a pickup up truck to gather yard wastes into but you are on the right track to the ultimate recycling. You are correct on banana mats. Their roots generate organic matter and Mycorrhiza friendly.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Avocado 24/7 Thread
« on: February 28, 2019, 12:57:13 AM »
Mexican Hass 39¢ this week at Aldi...  The woman ahead of me bought 15 while I bought 2 avos and grass fed hamburger......Meanwhile Mexican mega- Hass -plantations have been sending  to Aldi. At least Aldi in South East Florida.

All avo growers in Florida better be careful because Mexican Hass plantations are shipping out bigly and the average consumer don't care.

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: SaveMeJebus Yard Tour 2019
« on: February 28, 2019, 12:36:31 AM »
Frankenstein mango (multi-graft of Edgar and Sweet Tart with a few branches of the seedling.


Is this  grafted by  Guanabanus (total of 2 half feet high when I saw it) mango cut off then grafted onto by him I saw a few years ago?  Your whole yard is looking amazing. And you are on the water where moisture / fungus should be a problem.[/font]

Yes - that's the one that Har grafted. Hasn't held fruit yet so hopefully this year is the one.

Then Har / aka  Guanabanas is a genius who really knows what he is doing. Because when I saw these grafts they did not look promising. Meaning what did Har do but run grafting ops at Zill (yes he did and is now at Truly Tropical in Delray) for 10-15 years or more?

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: SaveMeJebus Yard Tour 2019
« on: February 28, 2019, 12:29:13 AM »
we re in 10B and there is 1 house close to my brother's house.  They have a good harvest tree full of fruits for last 2 years.  will see this year when i go to my brother's house.
will it work if i put ice around the root?

Ice will not make a dent unless you are in the ice business and can pour on ice every two days.  If you really like lychees then buy/plant different lychee varieties to spread your bet and longans too. Longans are almost lychees and make spectacular blossoms.






14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: SaveMeJebus Yard Tour 2019
« on: February 27, 2019, 04:03:28 PM »
very nice and healthy trees.   You're in Florida and still can't have Lynchee fruit?  Do you know why or any advice ?
i have a small one grafted on longan.  i am trying to shape it at this point.

Lychee is cool winter temps productive. This guy is in Southern Florida where winter temps have not been getting cool enough for the last few years. Also a myth...that South Florida is good for citrus. Though I have a pot full of Meyer Lemons I am going to repot into neutral PH soil.   The less extravagant citrus AKA primitive will weather through greening etc I think.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Grove in bloom 2019
« on: February 27, 2019, 03:59:55 PM »
Mango Grove in bloom 2019

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IE5T7GzzwbU


Mango trees looking  R/ good. I like the red flower bougainvillea at the end of  YT video. Many  wood chips you had to move and lay down and cool ornaments too.

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: SaveMeJebus Yard Tour 2019
« on: February 27, 2019, 03:41:23 PM »
Nice looking trees. You either have excellent soil or a great fertilization regimen (or both!). Congrats.

Lychees in our area are essentially shade trees that produce a sampling of fruit every once in a while. It wasn't like that before though. Previous to, say 2012, they were a lot more reliable from what I've been told. But like you, I will probably never pull the two I have, since they are such handsome shade trees.

The colder temps keep migrating further north. Might be time to start planting some breadfruit trees :D.

It will be very cute when-if global warming temps flip very soon.

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: SaveMeJebus Yard Tour 2019
« on: February 27, 2019, 03:29:15 PM »
Frankenstein mango (multi-graft of Edgar and Sweet Tart with a few branches of the seedling.


Is this  grafted by  Guanabanus (total of 2 half feet high when I saw it) mango cut off then grafted onto by him I saw a few years ago?  Your whole yard is looking amazing. And you are on the water where moisture / fungus should be a problem.[/font]

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: my 9month old niece eating durian
« on: February 25, 2019, 09:41:04 AM »

That photo is Madrid or Barcelona.

19

You are hard core when you are taking pictures of (beloved) fruit trees at night.  Me  here in SE Florida....I am loving all the snows and  (LA region got snowed on!)  rains California is getting. The snow pack in your mountains will be flooding downward and filling up reservoirs.

20
You did great on your mango and avocado choices. Pickering is very reliable for me so ...have confidence and proceed. Wood chip mulch and fertilizer! Brogdon and Lula are good choices because they cover 6 months. Your soil should be very sandy so fast draining. No need for mound plantings. This is for members in California with clay impervious soils.

Water with your garden hose a few times a week.      "Water is the best fertilizer" Harry Houseman said a few years ago.

21
California revels in a rare wet winter, and more storms are in the forecast
By Javier Panzar and Rong-Gong Lin II
Feb 06, 2019 | 11:05 AM
| San Francisco
Mammoth snow

Workers shovel giant snow drifts off the roof of the Mammoth Luxury Outlets in Mammoth Lakes after a blizzard dropped as much as 10 feet of snow in the biggest storm system so far this season Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019. Mammoth Mountain was closed Tuesday because of the blizzard but reopened Wednesday. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
1 / 20

Snowcapped mountains are pretty typical in California — just not the peaks that got a dusting this week.

A series of storms has brought a rare wet winter to the state, sending snow levels plunging and creating some surreal scenes Californians won’t soon forget: a blanket of white covering vineyards in Napa Valley. Plows clearing California 17 between Santa Cruz and San Jose. Peaks in the San Francisco Bay Area with an alpine feel. Even San Francisco’s Twin Peaks got some snow.

The conditions highlight a season of storms that have left their mark from the Sierra Nevada range, where one-third of California’s water supply originates, to Los Angeles, which has endured six dry winters out of its last seven. It’s a welcome turn of events for a state still recovering from severe drought.

By Tuesday, it was almost becoming too much of a good thing.

In the Sierra, as much as 10 feet of snow kept several ski resort closed Tuesday. In Southern California, officials warned of snow levels dropping Wednesday to elevations as low as 2,000 feet above sea level, which could shut down sections of Interstates 5 and 15 as well as other mountain passes.

Big Bear and Wrightwood were poised to see as much as 3 to 4 inches of snowfall through Tuesday night, and up to 8 inches could fall at Mt. Laguna in San Diego County.

This latest series of storms comes around the midpoint of California’s wet season.

“This is shaping up to be a wet year,” said Chris Orrock, spokesman for the California Department of Water Resources, citing atmospheric-river events that gave the state a good three weeks of rain in January before a round of cold storms arrived at the start of February.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Recommendations: Pruning tools
« on: February 06, 2019, 04:58:35 PM »
/

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Recommendations: Pruning tools
« on: February 06, 2019, 04:51:09 PM »
I cheaped out and ordered this chainsaw - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007AQZ9QC/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00__o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
It's amazon so if I hate it, I'll return it. Still may get the Ryobi kit later on down the road but this one will do the trick for now... I'll let you guys know if it's a decent saw or not. Should work for felling the trees I need to drop (Except my giant palm tree)

Return if you don't like. Bezos can afford it after blowing 70 billion on an upcoming divorce. I have a Ryobi non-recharge circular saw bought $12 at a garage sale. This was sad. I could tell her man had taken off and she was selling  off his stuffs for whatever!

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Recommendations: Pruning tools
« on: February 06, 2019, 04:44:53 PM »
Haha. I have mostly 1-2 inch diameter limbs from trees that I use for my firepit and the indoor fireplace. My larger diameter wood I split and cut out in my family's pasture an hour away. (we've collected probably 20+ chords over the years and are still working through it... :)  )

Same diameter wood I cut for a wood stove with an old Black and Decker circular saw.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Recommendations: Pruning tools
« on: February 05, 2019, 07:37:03 PM »
Thank you all for the recommendations I appreciate it.

As for getting a $40 chainsaw at harbor freight... I will use my chainsaw frequently (I have a wood fireplace) but not 'heavily' and I'd rather not have a chainsaw that will catch fire. :)
yeah right.......battery powered chainsaw for firewood.......zzzzzzzzzzz.....  Circa 1988 I used to cut firewood for a heating stove with a circular saw....

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