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Messages - Daintree

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: French translator required
« on: June 01, 2020, 10:42:09 AM »
While there might be problems with the more technical words, I have had great luck running articles, paragraph by paragraph, through Google Translate.  https://translate.google.com

Good luck!

Carolyn

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Using FloraNova Grow for potted trees
« on: May 26, 2020, 06:09:11 PM »
Hi All,
Does anybody use General Hydroponics FloraNova on their potted plants??????

I use it in my aeroponics tower and LOVE it.  It says you can use it for potted plants also.  The GH rep said to only use it four times a year.  The thing that appeals to me about it is that it has all the major, minor and micro nutrients in a liquid formula.
It is fairly expensive, but seems worth it for the convenience.

I am so tired of mixing, dissolving, waiting, shaking, waiting, dissolving, shaking, ad nauseum...

Thanks!
Carolyn


3
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Greenhouse Shade Screen
« on: May 26, 2020, 09:26:18 AM »
Thanks Millet!
You may have done this before, but could you post some pics of your setup???

Carolyn

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: USDA Aphis Small Lot Seeds Permit
« on: May 26, 2020, 09:24:53 AM »
Yes, the exporter will need to list the seeds at least to the genus level, but they prefer species.  Then they have to include other things, such as the country of origin, who collected the seed, etc. 
I just made a chart with the info that they need, and email it to the exporter, along with a COLOR copy of one of the shipping labels and the permit.  Makes it really easy.  I use it myself when I travel. 
I also carry seed cleaning supplies, various little plastic baggies, desiccant and water beads, and addressed padded envelopes to mail the seeds home.
All carried around the world a zillion times in my "Happy Little Vegemite" lunch box!

5
Alas, I grow trees, and the fabric pots only lasted about 3 years.  Having to repot a tree into a 20 gallon pot almost killed me. The other problem was that the fabric pots had a totally different watering schedule (more frequent) than the plastic pots, so if I didn't keep an eye on the ones in the fabric pots they drooped badly.

Same with making my own potting soil.  Did it for several years, and I have discovered that as me and my bones get older, it is wisest to choose my battles, and mixing potting is not one of them.

On the other hand, the fabric pots ARE great for veggies!  Even did corn in them once!

6
How long until it fruits?
Ive heard it takes verry long time to flower and fruit and then it dies.
I have one but no leaves on it at the moment.

You need to really get better sources for your information.
My source was right about Philodendron wich really takes 15-20 years to flower especially as a house plant.
The confusion comes from the fact they sell Monstera here as Philodendron ( its called wrongly split leaf Philodendron but its not a true Philodendron ).
After i read wikipedia it says Monstera also rarely flowers indoor so thats why i asked how long it takes to flower and fruit.
I have my Monstera for about 15 years ( plus who knows how old it was when i bought it) and never flowered altough all the summers stays outdoor and winters indoor.

The one i had that actually flowered and died after was probably a real Philodendron not Monstera.

Seriously?
Split leaf philodendron is a common name, Monstera is the botanical name.  They are usually the same.  They rarely bloom indoors because they need high light all year round.  Some houseplant varieties are hybrids so may not bloom and fruit, but really, if yours bloomed then died, you just killed it. And if you have one now with no leaves, you have a problem.  They are evergreen and should never lose all their leaves unless you are killing that one also.
Once again, get better sources for your info. Your vast amount of misinformation seems to be a common theme...

7
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / WTB Solanum lycocarpum seeds
« on: May 18, 2020, 02:16:31 PM »
Looking to buy Solanum lycocarpum (wolf fruit, wolf apple) seeds.

Thanks!
Carolyn

8
My earlier ones have fruited in 15 gallon pots, but I lost them in the cooler winter - overwatered, got root rot.

Carolyn

9
I am getting ready to pot up my baby papayas and need some advice. I have always had mixed results with them and will be experimenting this winter with warming the soil in the pots (in my greenhouse). I have some solo and some cobquecura plants.
My initial questions are -
What pot size?  I read that they will fruit in 3 gallon pots and would love to keep them down to this size if possible.
What soil and acidity do they prefer?  I usually use a very coarse, fast-draining soil in the low 6 to high 5 for pH. 
What is their fertilizer preference?
I am pretty sure that they need lots of water and light in the summer, and less water in the winter to prevent root rot. Or would I keep treating them as if it were "perpetual summer" if I am giving them extra light and bottom heat in the winter?


Thanks!
Carolyn

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Goji (wolfberry)
« on: May 15, 2020, 01:41:30 PM »
They are pretty tough, and have low requirements.  I just use a balanced fertilizer every so often.  It could easily produce fruit with the size of plant you have, if it gets enough sun.

Carolyn

11
The fruit tastes like a cross between pineapple and banana. The trick is that you have to wait until the outer scales fall off before you eat the kernels underneath.  If the outer scales are just loose, and you pick them off to get to the kernels, it makes your mouth sting, like you are eating glass.  So you have to be very patient. But well worth it.

Carolyn

12
I bought mine from Home Depot, and it took over the greenhouse, produced dozens of fruits, and I think it may have eaten the Fuller Brush man when he came over...

Carolyn

13
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Super Thrip?
« on: May 12, 2020, 06:52:28 PM »
Well, for heavens sake, when your experiment is over, don't turn it loose. Next thing we know, a race of Super Thrips will have taken over the world...

Carolyn

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What fruit is this?
« on: May 12, 2020, 06:50:46 PM »
Must be a first cousin to this blue bell pepper (and blue strawberries...) that my poor mom was all excited about!



15
You didn't list pitanga as one of the things you have (unless the rainforest plum is really a pitanga. I have had mine flower and the fruit fell before I even saw it...), so you may need to rule that one out, and also rule out birds, unless a puffin brought you something!
I am leaning more towards the acerola due to the color and shape.  Is it possible that the fruit doesn't ALWAYS have three seeds?  Coffee will make one, two or three seeds. 
Maybe it is a little mutant fruit... Plant it!!!

Cheers,
Carolyn

16
To me, it is more like cream soda and brown sugar.
And did anyone ever notice that when blooming, poison hemlock smells just like Fritos???

Carolyn

17
Thank you  for posting the photos.
I must be quite a contrast to be inside this tropical environment in the winter and see snow just outside the walls.
Do you have any issue with spider mite and ants? I only use my greenhouse for about 3 months, and always have to deal with those 2 problems.

Yes, there is nothing better than bare feet and a glass of wine in there, when the wind is howling and the snow is coming down outside.  As far as bugs, I do have a few spider mites and white flies, but keep them in check with frequent hosing of the plants.  No ant problems - I have Chinese Painted Quail that live out there, and they LOVE ants, centipedes, earwigs and slugs.  Once plants go outside, I tend NOT to bring them back in, due to pests, and unless the plant is rare or expensive, if it gets scale, mealybugs, etc, out it goes!

Carolyn

18
Well, I am not actually zone pushing.  The trees haven't figured out they're not in the tropics, thanks to the cheap natural gas we get here.  If I lived in another part of town, I'd even have geothermal - woo hoo!
Truth is, though, I am not as great as I made myself appear - half my citrus look like cr@p right now...

This is the orangerie - the banana is so easy!  Miracle Berries on the far right, orchids along the window, and misc African stuff that doesn't mind it hotter in the summer and a little cooler in the winter.



And the tropical house - note the bird feeder (I raise little parrots out there also) and the colorful Walmart toy tubs. They are a true 15 gallons, and I just drilled a bunch of holes in the bottom and sides.  Turns out the rope handles are NOT really strong enough to move the pot... Rose apple on the right, custard apple leaves hanging from top of pic, and pitangatuba to the left of bird feeder. You can't see the jabo or the vanilla orchids.



In the center of the picture below is my cinnamon tree.  I didn't know for years that the berries are edible! To the left you can barely make out one of the 5 year old cacao trees, and a couple of babies.  I have to hand pollinate them, but I have gotten a couple of pods. The two blue toy tubs on the right have my soursop and custard apple trees.  You can only see the trunks in the picture.  I have had to hand pollinate those too. 

I certainly won't make enough fruit to survive a famine, but it does keep me off the streets and out of the bars!


19
I have a bottle of pool ph down granules - Sodium Bisulfate

Is this of any use for plants?  If not I will toss it, I don't have a pool anymore

I have always been afraid to use that, knowing that it is not made for plants.

Carolyn

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Looking for Pots
« on: May 10, 2020, 04:32:20 PM »
I don't know about your area, but here, the local nurseries are having problems recycling their pots. Make friends with them and they give them away! I have a big stash behind the house, since I will never turn a huge pot down, even if I don't need it right away.

Carolyn

21
Because I am zone 6, and I can't dig holes in my greenhouse floor do to a huge amount of large maple tree roots, I have EVERYTHING in pots. Mostly 15-20 gallon, the biggest is 25 gallon.

They are all doing great, and here is what has fruited for me so far -
Soursop
Custard Apple
Annatto
Caper
Papaya
Babaco
Cinnamon
Various citrus
Coffee
Pitanga
Pitangatuba
Cacao
Noni (bleh...)
Banana
Jaboticaba
Various guavas
Cas mango (spondias dulcis)
Rose apple

I think I am missing a couple, but can't think of them now...

Cheers,
Carolyn

That's awesome!
What kind of temperature are you able to maintain in the greenhouse during your winter?

In the tropical house, it is 60-85 all year round, although during a really cold winter it may dip to 50.  In the orangerie, it gets hotter during the summer and colder during the winter, sometimes down to 40.  Each section has its own gas furnace, and I can further control things by shutting the door between the two.  This was purely accidental, as I just didn't build a big enough greenhouse to begin with, and almost immediately added on!


22
Because I am zone 6, and I can't dig holes in my greenhouse floor do to a huge amount of large maple tree roots, I have EVERYTHING in pots. Mostly 15-20 gallon, the biggest is 25 gallon.

They are all doing great, and here is what has fruited for me so far -
Soursop
Custard Apple
Annatto
Caper
Papaya
Babaco
Cinnamon
Various citrus
Coffee
Pitanga
Pitangatuba
Cacao
Noni (bleh...)
Banana
Jaboticaba
Various guavas
Cas mango (spondias dulcis)
Rose apple

I think I am missing a couple, but can't think of them now...

Cheers,
Carolyn

23
I acidify my water with pH Down from the hydroponics store.  To lower the pH from 8 to 6.5, it takes me 2-3 cups for my 175 gallon pond.  I tried vinegar, but with regular vinegar I had to add almost a whole gallon for 175 gallons.  Then I tried horticultural vinegar, and it takes about the same amount as the pH Down, only here at least, the pH Down is cheaper, so I have stayed with that. 
I also use a quick acting sulphur that I top dress with every so often.  It is Espoma Organic Soil Acidifier that I get at Home Depot, and has dosages for pots, which I really like.
Then, when I pot my baby Miracle Berry bushes up, I use a fast-draining soil mix that uses peat moss and not coco coir, since coco coir can have a higher pH than peat moss.
So far, mine are doing awesome, and I get so many fruits that I can't give them away fast enough.  Once people have experienced the "party trick", then the novelty is gone and they don't usually want more.  So I just eat them by the handful while working in my greenhouse.

Cheers,
Carolyn

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: WHY IS THIS HAPPENING AGAIN?
« on: May 06, 2020, 01:10:06 AM »
To me, they almost look waterlogged, and maybe not enough light. 
How wet is the soil?  Maybe the grow tents are too wet.
I just grow mine in the greenhouse, where the humidity never gets over about 50-60%, and they do fine with just a daily hose-down, if I remember.  The temps range from 60 to 90, but they are in mostly shade. They seem to really prefer VERY well-draining soil.

Carolyn

25
"Full Shade"is such a relative term. 
We are at 2700 ft and not a cloud in the sky for 7 months, so when I move my coffee out in the summer they are in deep shade and produce heavily.  Put them into part sun and they fry to a crisp. 
But my son, who lives in Portland at 200 ft where it is cloudy/rainy all summer, has his right out in full sun all season and they do wonderfully.
I would think Florida includes lots of cloud cover in "full sun" areas, and they can go out in dappled or very light shade.

Cheers from the High Desert!
Carolyn

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